Groom Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Groom Family Coat of Arms

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Groom Coat of Arms Meaning

Groom Name Origin & History

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Groom Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Groom blazon are the cross pattee fitchee, helmet and pile. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, gules and ermine .

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. The cross pattee fitchee is typical of these, pattee indicating that the upper arms spread out at the ends, fitchee showing that the lower arm ends in a point as if is to planted in the ground.

We should not be surprised to find items of armour depicted on shields, and perhaps to the wearer none is more important that the helmet. Wade suggests that its presence denotes “Wisdom and surety in defence”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P139 There are many variations of helmet described, now almost indistinguishable to modern eyes, and not having any particular significance – perhaps because of some play on words with the family name. There are complex heraldic rules and guidelines for the depictions of helmets belonging to various grades of nobility, lack of space prevents us from listing them all here!13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:helmet

The pile was originally quite a simple shape, being a triangle reaching from the top of the shield down to a point near the lower centre 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pile. A clear example being that of CHANDOS awarded in 1337, Or a pile gules. There is some argument as to the origin, Wade suggests some similarity with the meaning of “pile” in construction (a foundation) and hence that the shape could be adopted by those who have demonstrated some ability in the building trade 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48. An earlier writer, Guillim, perhaps more plausibly suggested that the shape echoes those of a pennant or triangular flag 16A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P52 The shape is quite distinctive however and became popular, leading to many embellishments to distinguish it from its close fellows, with multiple piles meeting at various points, starting from various edges and with additional decoration, leading to potentially quite complex descriptions!

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Groom Name

Groom Origin:

England

Origins of Groom:

The origin of this unique surname evolved originally from an old English word “grom(e)” which mean a man-servant, but in some places was particular to mean “shepherd” which mean goat flock. As the previous recordings verified as John Lambegrom (Cambridgeshire 1279), John Schepgrom (Essex, 1327) and Richard le Gotegrom (Suffolk, 1335). The non-particular type of the name was first put down into writing at the starting of the 12th Century. Ernald le Grom arise in the year 1187 “Pipe Rolls of Gloucestershire” and Roger le Groom in the year 1351 “Assize Court Rolls of Essex”. In the new or present style, the name has two different formations, Groom, and Groome. On 29th November 1579 Margarett Gromme, a new-born, was named in St. Giles, Cripplegate, London and on 31st December 1667, Elizabetha Groom was named in St. Martin in the area of Westminster.

Variations:

More common variations are: Groome, Guroom, Grwoom, Groomw, Grooma, Grom, Croom, Grome, Groma, Gromm.

England:

The origins of the surname Groom were in Suffolk where people held a family seat from early times, someone says better before the success of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hasting in 1066 A.D,

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Richard Grom, dated about 1100. It was during the time of King Henry 1, who was known to be the “The Lion of Justice”, and took place in “Pipe Rolls of Norfolk.” The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States:

People with the Groom surname also settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th and 18th and 19th.Individuals who settled in the 17th Century included William Groom arrived in New Jersey in the year 1675.

The following century saw much more Grooms arrive including Ann Groom, Charles Groom, Anne and Charles Groom settled in Maryland respectively in the years 1739 and 1740.

People with the Groom surname who arrived in the 19th century included many people like Daniel, Edward, George, James, John, Patrick, Roger, Terrence, Thomas and William Groom all arrived between the years 1840 and 1860. James and Robert Groom landed in St Clair Division, Illinois in the same year 1870. Gerd J Groom landed in Lowa in the year 1882.

Canada:

Some of the Groom people who settled ultimately in Canada in the 19th century included Thomas Groom, John Groom, and Sarah Groom arrived in Nova Scotia in the same year 1750.

Australia:

Some of the Groom people who settled ultimately in Australia in the 19th century included Emma Groom, an English prisoner from Staffordshire, who was shifted aboard the ship “Angelina on April 25 1844, settling in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia.

New-Zealand:

The settlement of Groom family also observed in the 19th century, in New-Zealand. The people who arrived in New-Zealand included Walter Groom at the age of 20 who was a laborer arrived in Auckland, New-Zealand aboard the ship “ Rooparell” in the year 1874.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Groom: United States 6,336; England 5,119; Australia 1,305; Canada 641; South Africa 1,662; Germany 471; Scotland 203; New-Zealand 267; Wales 214; France 98

Notable People:

Aaron Groom (1987), was a Fiji rugby league player.

Andy Groom (1979), was an American football punter.

Arthur Groom (politician) (1852–1922), was an Australian man of politics and land manager.

Arthur Groom (writer) (1904–1953), was an Australian author, speaker, journalist, and cameraperson.

Arthur Hesketh Groom (1846–1918), was a British inventor of the Kobe Golf Club, the first golf club in Japan.

Bob Groom (1884–1948), was an American player in baseball.

Buddy Groom (1965), was also an American player in baseball.

Catherine Groom Petroski (1939), was an American writer.

Jerry Groom (1929–2008), whose nickname was “Boomer,” was an American player in football.

Kathleen Clarice Groom (1872–1954), was an English writer.

Karl Groom was a British musician and composer.

Lorne B. Groom (1919–1994), was a New Brunswick physician and politician.

Michael Groom (footballer), was a New Zealand member of national football team.

Groom Family Gift Ideas

Browse Groom family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: None. Blazon: Ermine three piles azure each charged with a cross pattee fitchee or, on a chief gules two helmets close proper. Crest—A dexter arm embowed in armour proper garnished or, holding in the hand a gauntlet, both proper suspended from the wrist by a pink riband a shield gold, thereon a pile gules charged with a cross pattee fitchee argent.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P139
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:helmet
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pile
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48
16. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P52