Hallet Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hallet Family Coat of Arms

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Hallet Coat of Arms Meaning

Hallet Name Origin & History

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Hallet Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hallet blazon are the bezant, bend and lion. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, gules and sable .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.3The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the bezant Is a typical example of this, and in British Heraldry always takes the tincture or. It shares the same root as the name Byzantium, being associated with the gold coin of that city and indeed, in some heraldic traditions is represented as a coin-like disk in perspective. Wade suggests that the use of this device refers to ” one who had been found worthy of trust and treasure.” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 16Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 17A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 18The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hallet Name

Hallet Origin:

England, France

Origins of Hallet:

This surname is a very limited different form of the famous Olde English, Anglo-Saxon, and Germanic ‘halla’, which appeared in its most common form as ‘Hall’ – a habitational or professional name for one who resided or worked at either the local council chambers or the Kings Manor. The original spelling was Heall, Halla or Holi, with variants and patronymics Hallen, Hallin, Halle, Hallex, Hallet, Hallot and Hallut, the latter being of French-Flanders origin. ‘Hallt’ is a very elusive variant, not being noted in England before 1910, and only appearing once in the London Directory of 1985.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hallett, Haillet, Halletu, Halleot, Halliet, Halet, Heallet, Hallt, Hoallett, Hallouet.

England:

The origins of the surname Hallet appeared in Kent where people held a family seat from early times. Some say before the invasion of Duke William and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Alice Hallet, dated about 1629, christened at St. Giles “Cripplegate, London.” It was during the time of King Charles I, who was known to be the “The Martyr,” dated 1625-1649. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Hallet had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Hallet landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Hallet who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Andrew Hallet settled in Virginia in 1620. Andrew Hallet, who landed in Lynn, Massachusetts in 1637.

People with the surname Hallet who landed in the United States in the 18th century included George Hallet at the age of 23, arrived in New York in 1706.

The following century saw more Hallet surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Hallet who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included T L Hallet, who landed in Mobile, Ala in 1821. William Hallet, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851.

Canada:

People with the surname Hallet who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Lt. Daniel Hallet U.E. who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick near the year 1784, he gave services in DeLancey’s 2nd Battalion. Mr. Joseph Hallet U.E. born in Long Island, New York, USA who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick near 1784. Mr. Moses Hallet U.E. who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick c. 1784. Capt. Samuel Hallet U.E. born in Long Island, New York, USA who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick c. 1784 he served in DeLancey’s 2nd Battalion. Mr. Samuel Hallet Jr., U.E. born in Long Island, New York, USA who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick near the year 1784.

New-Zealand:

Some of the individuals with the surname Hallet who landed in New-Zealand in the 19th century included James Hallet landed in Wellington, New Zealand in the year 1840.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hallet: Belgium 846; France 845; United States 525; England 113; Canada 94; Australia 80; Spain 16; New Zealand 12; South Africa 2; Luxembourg 2.

Notable People:

André Hallet (1890–1959), was a Belgian painter.

Étienne Sulpice Hallet (1755–1825), was a French-born American artist.

Gérard Hallet (born 1946), is a French soccer player.

Gilles Hallet (1620–1694), was a Flemish Baroque artist.

Jean-Pierre Hallet (1927–2004), was a Belgian ethnologist, and naturalist.

Jim Hallet (born 1960), is an American golf player.

John Hallet is a British actor.

Hallet Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hallet family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Higham, near Canterbury). Or, a chief engrailed sable over all on a bend engrailed gules three bezants. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi lion argent holding in the paws a bezant.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
16. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
17. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60