Halsted Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Halsted Family Coat of Arms

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Halsted Coat of Arms Meaning

Halsted Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Halsted. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Halsted Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Halsted blazon are the eagle, chief, chequy and plate. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and ermine.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

The chief is an area across the top of the field 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40. It appears in many different forms and can itself be charged with other charges and ordinaries, 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chief, being treated almost as if it were a completely separate area. In its simplest form it can be clearly identified. Early examples include the award by Henry III of England to the knight Robert de MORTEYN BRETON of Ermine, a chief gules.

Chequy (a word with a surprising number of different spellings!) is what is known as a treatment, a repeating pattern usually used to fill the whole background of the shield with a series of alternately coloured squares 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy. These squares are usually quite small (there should be at least 20 in total), giving the appearance of a chess board, but any combination of colours may be used. It can also be used as a patterning on some of the larger ordinaries, such as the pale and fess, in which case there are three rows of squares. Wade, an authority on heraldic meaning groups chequy with all those heraldic features that are composed of squares and believes that they represent “Constancy”, but also quotes another author Morgan, who says that they can also be associated with “wisdom…verity, probity…and equity”, and offers in evidence the existence of the common English saying that an honest man is a ”Square Dealer” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Halsted Name

Halsted Origin:

England

Origins of Halsted:

This interesting and unique name of old English origin and is a geographical name from places so called in Essex, Kent, and Leicester, and acquired from the Old English components ‘(ge)heald’, which means a shelter or place for animals, and ‘stede,’ which means a region or building. So, the whole meaning of the name is a place of shelter for animals. Halstead in Essex was first noted in the Domesday Book of 1086 as ‘Haltesteda’ in the Feet of Fines of 1202 as ‘Haudested’ and 1218 as ‘Haldstede.’ The place in Kent shows as ‘Halsted’ in the Feet of Fines of 1201 and Halstead in Leicester as ‘Elstede’ (Domesday Book of 1086). Among the Middle Ages people moving from their mother town would often pick the hamlet name as a source of recognition, so resulting in a wide distribution of the name. One Jeremy Halsted married Margaret Pickeridge in May 1591 at St. Mary le Bow, London.

Variations:

More common variations are: Halstead, Halstied, Halsteed, Halstaed, Hallsted, Halstedt, Halsteda, Halstede, Halsteid, Haulsted.

England:

The surname Halsted first appeared in Essex where a town and local church was located in Braintree County. The Domesday Book offers two listing for the place Halstead. The first noted as Haltesteda in Essex, the estate held by William de Warenne and portion of the Hundred of Hinckford. The land held two hides (land enough for two house matters) less 4 acres where 30 free men resided before the Invasion. Over in Leicestershire, the hamlet Elstede was recorded in similar relation as land held by the King, part of Allexton and was three carucates of land, less two bovates. In other words, much smaller than the Essex hamlet. To confuse things more, Halstead is a village and local church in the Sevenoaks county of Kent, but this hamlet was not noted in the Domesday Book.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Ralph de Halsteda, dated about 1181, in the “Poll Tax Records,” Suffolk. It was during the time of King Henry II who was known to be the “The Builder of Churches,” dated 1154-1189. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Halsted had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Halsted landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Halsted who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included George Halsted settled in Virginia in the year 1731. John Halsted, who landed in Ohio in the year 1798.

The following century saw many more Halsted surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Halsted who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included J L Halsted, who landed in San Francisco, California in the year 1850.

Canada:

The following century saw much more Halsted surnames arrive. People with the surname Halsted who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Thomas Halsted, who came to Canada in 1841.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Halsted who landed in Australia in the 19th century included William Halsted, who was an English prisoner from Sussex, who shifted aboard the “Arab” in February 1834, settling in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Halsted: United States 1,574; South Africa 183; England 118; Canada 115; Denmark 93; Australia 82; New Zealand 26; Singapore 24; Zimbabwe 5; Peru 3.

Notable People:

Anna Roosevelt Halsted (1906–1975), was the first child of Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Byron Halsted (1852–1918), was an American biologist and professor.

George Bruce Halsted (1853–1922), was an American expert in mathematics.

John Halsted (1761-1830), was a Royal Navy officer.

John B. Halsted (born 1798), is a New York political leader.

Laurence Halsted (born 1984), is a British fencer.

Lawrence Halsted (1764-1841), was a Royal Navy administrator.

Halsted Family Gift Ideas

Browse Halsted family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Sunning, co. Berks, and London; granted 10 May, 1687). Gu. an eagle displ. erm. beaked and legged or, a chief chequy of the last and az. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet chequy or and az. a demi eagle issuant erm. beaked gold.
2) (Rowley). Gu. an eagle displ. erm. beaked and legged or, a chief chequy or and az.
3) (London). Gu. an eagle, displ. erm. a chief chequy ar. and az.
4) Gu. two bars ar. in chief three plates.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chief
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100