Halton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Halton Family Coat of Arms

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Halton Coat of Arms Meaning

Halton Name Origin & History

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Halton Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Halton blazon are the lion, per pale, escallop and garb. The four main tinctures (colors) are argent, or, gules and azure.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 13Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 14A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

The background of the shield can be divided into two potrtions in a variety of ways, and each portion treated differently. In the heraldry of continental Europe there is a tendency to use these areas to combine two different designs, but in British and Scottish heraldry the preference is to treat the divided field as a single decorative element with other features placed as normal. Whatever tradition is followed, one of the most common divisions is per pale, a simple separation along a vertical line. Wade assigns no particular meaning to the use of this division, but suggests that they simply arose from the multi-coloured garments typically worn at the time of the birth of heraldry. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P56

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 18A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 19The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Halton Name

Halton Origin:

England

Origins of Halton:

This interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a geographical surname, from various places so called all over England, like those in Berkshire, Lincolnshire, Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire, to name but a few, there being at least eleven Haltons in England. Maybe surprisingly the various hamlets of Halton have many similar origin versions as the common meaning is “hall farm”, the farm (tun) relating to the estate house (halh), but other alternatives such as “valley farm” (originally “haugh-tun”), and ” stony farm” (hol-tun), these being from Lancashire and Lincolnshire individually. The placename and the surname first shows in Norman times. The surname advancement contains as Richard de Halton (Lincolnshire, 1270), Henry Halton, observer, at the London Assizes in 1470. While John de Halton, Bishop of Carlisle near the year 1305, dismissed Robert the Bruce. Notable name carriers noted in the “Dictionary of National Biography” are Immanuel Halton (1628 – 1699), whose sight of a solar eclipse came to the Royal Society in 1675, and Timothy Halton, provost of Queen’s College, Oxford, 1677 – 1704. He was vice-chancellor of Oxford from 1679 – 1681.

Variations:

More common variations are: Haulton, Healton, Hailton, Hoalton, Haliton, Haleton, Haltone, Haylton, Haldton, Hallton.

England:

The origins of the surname Halton appeared in Lancashire where people held a family seat from old times. Some say before the invasion of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Algar de Haltona, dated about 1086, in the “Domesday Book.” It was during the time of King William I, who was known to be the “The Conqueror,” dated 1066-1087. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with name Halton had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Halton landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Halton who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included John Halton came in Potomack in 1747. James Halton came to Maryland in 1775.

The following century saw more Halton surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Halton who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included E Halton, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1855.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Halton who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Jane Halton, an English criminal from Lancaster, who moved aboard the “Arab” in December 1835, settling in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Halton who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Richard Halton arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Zealandia” in 1874.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Halton: United States 1,696; England 1,463; Australia 486; Ireland 338; South Africa 201; Canada 155; Wales 102; New Zealand 85; Scotland 53; Spain 19.

Notable People:

Albert Halton (1893-1971), was an English receiver of the Victoria Cross

Charles Halton (1876-1959), was an American film actor.

Charles Halton (public servant) (1932–2013), was an Australian public servant.

David Halton (born 1940), is a Canadian writer of CBC News.

Immanuel Halton (1628-1699), was an English stargazer and mathematician.

Jane Halton (1960–), is an Australian public servant.

John Halton (1491-1527/1530), was a Member (MP) of the Parliament of England for Lincoln in 1523.

John de Halton also called John de Halghton (died 1324), was an English clergyman.

Kathleen Halton (1937-1995), was a Canadian-British writer, producer, and screenwriter.

Matthew Halton (1904-1956), was a Canadian television reporter.

P. W. Halton (1841-1909), was an Irish-born director and music producer of D’Oyly Carte Opera Company.

Reg Halton (1916-1988), was an English football player.

Sean Halton (born 1987), is an American professional baseball player for Milwaukee Brewers.

Timothy Halton (1632?-1704), was an English churchman.

Halton Family Gift Ideas

Browse Halton family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Samford, co. Essex, bart., extinct 1823). Per pale az. and gu. a lion ramp. ar. Crest—A lion sejant ar. holding in the dexter paw a broken lance ppr.
2) (Greenthwaite Hall, co. Cumberland, temp. Richard II.). Per pale gu. and az. a lion ramp. or. Crest, as the preceding.
3) (South Winfield, co. Derby). Per pale gu. and az. a lion ramp. or.
4) (Bristol). Per pale az. and gu. a lion ramp. ar. charged on the shoulder with an escarbuncle of the second.
5) (co. Lancaster). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. crowned or.
6) (co. Lincoln, 1640). Per pale gu. and vert a lion ramp. ar.
7) (co. York). Gu. a saltire engr. or.
8) Ar. a griffin pass. (another, segreant) wings displ. sa. armed gu. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet gu. a griffin's head sa. betw. two wings, the dexter or, the sinister az.
9) (Halton Craven, co. York). Ar. two bars az.
10) Ar. two bars az. on each as many escallops or.
11) Gu. a lion ramp. or, depressed by a bend erm.
12) Az. two bars ar. in chief three escallops or.
13) Sa. a chev. or, betw. three garbs ar.
14) Sa. a cross engr. erm.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
13. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
14. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P56
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
18. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91