Hamell Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hamell Family Coat of Arms

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Hamell Coat of Arms Meaning

Hamell Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Hamel.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Hamell. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Hamell Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hamell blazon are the chevron dancette, griffin and crescent. The two main tinctures (colors) are or and azure.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries, being in the form of an inverted ‘v’ shape 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chevron. It is a popular feature, visually very striking and hence developed to have various decorative edges applied to distinguish otherwise identical coats of arms. Dancettee (sometimes spelled dancetty or dancy) is a bold, zig-zag pattern, perhaps the most distinctive of the patterned edges. Purists might argue that the French variant denché Is not the same, being of larger size and with the points being 90º, but there is much variation in actual practice so the difference is perhaps not that meaningful. Wade, quoting Guillim suggests that dancettee be attributed to mean water, in the same fashion as undy or wavy, and one can understand this allusion.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]9Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hamell Name

Origins of Hamell:
The Hamell surname acquires from an Old French word “hamel,” which meant “homestead.”  It was likely first used as a name to describe a person who resided at a farm on the outskirts of a main village.

Variations:
More common variations are: Hamel, Hamell, Hamil, Hamill, Hammel, Hammell, Hammil, Hammill, Hamelin, Hamlin, du Hamel, du Hamell, duHamil, du Hamill, du Hammel, du Hammell, du Hammil and much more.

England:
The surname Hamell first appeared in Normandy (French: Normandie), the earlier Duchy of Normandy, where this illustrious family held a family seat at Desert, Fougeroux, and St.-Etienne.

United States of America:
Some of the people with the name Hamell who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Murdoch Hamel] settled in New York State in the year 1738.  Murdoch Hamell, who landed in New York in the same year 1738.  Archibald Hamell, who arrived in New York in 1740.  Mary Hamell, who landed in New York in the year 1740.  Archibald Hamel] settled in New York state in the same year 1740. The following century saw much more Hamell surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Hamell who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Geo Hamell, who arrived in Baltimore in the year 1833.  Bernard Hamell, who came to Baltimore in the year 1844.  Archibald, James, John and Jacob Hamel] settled in Philadelphia between 1749 and 1850.  Charles Hamell, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in the year 1873.

Canada:
People with the surname Hamell settled in Canada in the 19th century.   Some of the people with the surname Hamell who came to Canada in the 19th century included Patrick Hamell at the age of 26, a labourer, arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the ship “John & Mary” from Belfast, Ireland.  Ann Hamell at the age of 18, arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the ship “John & Mary” from Belfast, Ireland.

Hamell Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hamell family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Buckingham). Az. a chev. dancettee or.
2) Az. a fesse betw. three griffins pass. or. Crest—A crescent or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chevron
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
9. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106