Hamer Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hamer Family Coat of Arms

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Hamer Coat of Arms Meaning

Hamer Name Origin & History

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Hamer Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Hamer blazon are the bend and lion. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, or and argent .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 14Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 15A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hamer Name

Hamer Origin:
England, Ireland

Origins of Hamer:
Listed as Hamer, Hammer, Hamor, and Hammor, this is an old English surname.  It has two possible origins.  The first is locational from the village of Hamer, near Rochdale, in the district of Lancashire.  The origin is from the Olde English pre 7th-century word “hamor” meaning a rock or crag.  Most name holders in the north of the country are from this origin. The second source is early German, Flemish or Dutch, being a metonymic professional name for a maker of hammers, or probably a user of a hammer, and acquiring from the word “hamar” meaning stone. It is clearly an example of a transferred meaning, as hammers have been made of metals since at least Roman times.  Early examples of the surname record taken from remaining rolls and records contain as John le Hammer in the pipe rolls of the division of Sussex in the year 1332, whileJohn de Heymer noted in “Baines History of Lancashire” in 1461.  Katerina Hamer married Thomas Anderson, at St. Andrew’s Enfield, in the county of Middlesex, in July 1560, and Ralph, the son of Ralph Hamer, named at St. Nicholas Acons, in the city of London, in February 1589.  Edward and James Hamer, who were Irish famine emigrants, sailed from Liverpool to New York aboard the ship “Windsor-Castle” in June 1847.   Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to “develop” often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Variations:
More common variations are: Hammer, Haymer, Haimer, Hamyer, Haumer, Heamer, Hamera, Hamery, Hameer.

England:
The surname Hamer first found in Lancashire where they held a family seat from very early times, some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

Ireland:
Many of the people with surname Hamer had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Hamer landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th.    Some of the people with the name Hamer who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Percy and Raphe Harner settled in Virginia in 1626.  Edward Harner, who arrived in Virginia in 1635.  Pee Harner, who landed in Virginia in 1653.

People with the surname Hamer who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Johan Peter Hamer, who landed in New York in 1709.  Johann Henrich Harner, who arrived in New York, NY in 1710.  Fredk Hamer, aged 35, arrived in Pennsylvania in 1748.  Jacob Hamer, aged 16, arrived in Pennsylvania in 1748.  Sebastian Harner, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1754.

The following century saw more Hamer surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Hamer who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included B Harner, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1802.  Hannah Harner, aged 23, landed in Kennebunk, Me in 1830.  Richard Harner, aged 34, arrived in Kennebunk, Me in 1830.  Mary Hamer, aged 2, arrived in Kennebunk, Me in 1830.  John Harner, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1846.

Australia:
Some of the individuals with the surname Hamer who landed in Australia in the 19th century included John Hamer, aged 54, a labourer, arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Admiral Boxer”.  Elizabeth Ann Hamer, aged 22, a domestic servant, arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Admiral Boxef’.  Susanna Hamer, aged 14, a domestic servant, arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Admiral Boxer.”

New-Zealand:
Some of the population with the surname Hamer who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Thomas Hamer landed in Auckland, New Zealand in 1840.  Thomas Hamer arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Cashmere” in 1851.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hamer:
United States 8,065; England 6,308; South Africa 1,680; Germany 1,580; Netherlands 1,497; Australia 1,413; Canada 1,005; Wales 914; Brazil 700; Argentina 538.

Notable People:
Ben Hamer (born 1987), is an English football player with Charlton Athletic.
Bent Hamer (born 1956), is a Norwegian film director.
Ova Hamer (born 1958), is an Argentine photographer.
Colin Hamer (born 1988), is a Sint Maartener cricketer.
Dale Hamer was an American football official.
David Hamer (1923–2002), was an Australian leader.
David Hamer (footballer) (born 1866), is a Welsh footballer with Southampton F.C.
Dean Hamer (born 1951), is an American geneticist.
Fannie Lou Hamer (1917–1977), was an American civil rights leader.
Frank Hamer (1884–1955), was a Texas Ranger.
Fritz Hamer was a botanist, classifier of species such as Isochilus aurantiacus.

Hamer Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hamer family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Hamer, co. Lancaster). Blazon: Sable a bend or, between two lions rampant argent.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
15. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60