Hammond Coat of Arms

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Baron Hammond). Ar. on a chev. pean betw. three mullets sa. a sun in splendour or. Crest—Betw. a stag's attires a falcon rising ppr. each wing charged with a mullet or. Supporters—On either side a falcon, wings elevated ppr. gorged with a chain or, pendent therefrom an escocheon ar. charged with a mullet sa. Motto—Per tot discrimina rerum.
2) (co. Kent; certified May, 1779). Az. a fesse erm. betw. three lions’ heads erased or. Crest—An eagle, wings expanded ar. beaked and legged or, betw. two stags’ horns ppr.
3) (Cheam, co. Surrey). Gu. three demi lions pass. or.
4) (cos. Bucks and Kent). Per pale or and az. three demi lions pass. counterchanged. Crest—A wolf's head erased per pale indented or and az.
5) (St. Alban's Court, near Wingham, co. Kent; descended from Thomas Hammond, who purchased, in 1551, the manor of St. Alban’s). (General Sir Francis Thomas Hammond, of Plumpton, co. Suffolk, G.C.H., Lieut.-Govemor of Edinburgh Castle). Ar. on a chev. sa. betw. three pellets, each charged with a martlet of the field, aa many escallops or, a bordure engr. vert. Crest—An eagle’s head erased sa. enfiled with a rose gu. the rose issuing rays or. Motto—Pro rege et patria.
6) (Wistaston Hall, co. Chester). Per chev. engr. gu. and ar. three oxenheads ppr. Crest—A boar pass. ppr.
7) Quarterly, or and gu. on a bend sa. a cross pattee fitchee of the first.
8) (Fun. Ent. of Col. Hammond, buried in Christ Church, Dublin, 19 Oct. 1654). Ar. five crescents in cross az. a crescent for diff.
9) (Mount Hanover, co. Wexford, extinct; Mount Hanover sold to the ancestor of Glascott, of Killowen. Fun. Ent. of Nathaniel Hammond, of Dublin, merchant, d. 12 Oct. 1622, m. Susan, dau. of Richard Proudfoot). Or, on a chev. sa. three martlets ar. in chief a cross crosslet fitchee of the second.
10) (Windingham and Pampisford nail, co. Cambridge, co. Herts, Tuddington, co. Middlesex, Haling House, co. Surrey, and co. York). Per pale gu. and az. three demi lions pass. guard. or. Crest—A wolf's head erased quarterly or and az.
11) (co. Hants). Or, five crescents in cross az.
12) (Isle of Wight). Same Arms, tinctures reversed.
13) (Holly Grove, co. Berks, bart.). Ar. on a chev. sa. betw. two pellets, each charged with a martlet ar. in chief and an oak wreath ppr. in base three escallops or, a bordure engr. vert. Crest—Out of a naval crown or, the sails ar. an eagle sa. Motto—Paratus et fidelis. Supporters—Dexter, an eagle reguard. sa.; sinister, a stork ppr. each navally gorged with a line reflexed over the back or.
14) (co. Kent). Az. three demi lions pass. guard. or. Crest—A wolf's head erased quarterly per fesse indented or and az.
15) (co. Kent). Per pale az. and or, three demi lions pass. guard. in pale ar.
16) (West Acre, High House, South Wotton, and Swaffham, co. Norfolk). Az. three doves (another, martlets) betw. two chev. or. Crest—On a rocky mount ppr. a dove rising ar. holding in the beak a slip of olive vert.
17) (Chertsey, co. Surrey; granted to John Hamond, M.D., "physician to Henry, Prince of Wales," by St. George, Norroy, 1607). Or, five crescents in cross az. on a canton of the last an ostrich’s feather in pale ar. Crest—A crescent ar. within an annulet az. charged with eight estoiles or.
18) (Over Dinsdale Hall, co. York). Ar. a chev. betw. three mullets sa.
19) (Tuddington, co. Middlesex; Leonard Hamond, grandson of Leonard Hamond, Esq., of Royston, co. Herts. Visit. Middlesex, 1663). Per pale az. and gu. three demi lions pass. guard. or, quartering three roses or. Crest—A wolf’s head erased quarterly or and az.
20) (co. Salop). Ar. on a chev. engr. gu. betw. three cinquefoils az. as many martlets or.

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hammond Name

Hammond Surname Name Meaning, Origin, History, & Etymology
This is an English last name has three possible origin theories. First, it is of Norman origin that derived from the personal (first) name Hamo or Hamon, which in turn derives from the Germanic first name Haimo, itself a short form of several compound names beginning with the word haim, meaning home. A second theory is that this English surname derived from an Old Norse/Viking or Scandinavian masculine given name Hamundr, which consists of the words har (high) and mund (protection), which was introduced into England during the 600s AD. Along the lines of this theory, it may have derived from the first Viking-Norse name Amundry, meaning “Ancestor protection”. It’ possible the two names merged over the years. The name made its way into England during the Norman Invasion in 1066 AD. The name also made its way into Ireland where it was used to sometimes represent Hamill and even McCammon(d) and Mac Ammoinn, a name from County Down. A third theory, offered by William Arthur states it comes from “Him—mount, the town or house on the elevation. It may come from Hamon”. Along the lines of this theory, author Eric Rosenthal states it means “Home-on-Hill” in Old French.

In his 1848 book, A Topographical Dictionary of England, states the following in regard to this family name: “It is the property of A. Hamond, Esq., whose seat here, High House, is a handsome mansion in the Italian style, finely situated in a well-wooded park. The church is partly in the early and partly in the later English style, with a square embattled tower, and contains the mausoleum of the Hamond family, and many beautiful monuments to several of its members”.

Some assert the name first became established in the British Isles in county Kent. The Roll of Battle Abbey, a list of companions of William the Conqueror, shows that the sons, brothers, or grandsons of Hamon Dentatus came with William. One was named Robert Fitz-Hamon, who conquered Glamorganshire, Wales. The second was Haimon (known as Dapifer in the Domesday Book) who became the Lord Steward for King William. Hamon Denatus had two sons, Richard of Granville and Crequer (who received the Barony of Chatama from Robert Fitz-Hamon, and other lands in Kent).

Spelling Variations
Some spelling variants or names with similar etymologies include Hamond, Hamound, Hammont, Hammons, Hammonds, Hamon, Hammand, and Hammand.

Popularity & Geographic Distribution
The last name Hammond ranks 422nd in popularity in the United Status as of the 2000 Census. The name ranks particularly high in the following six states: Delaware, South Carolina, Maryland, Michigan, Idaho, and Ohio.

The surname Hammond frequency/commonness ranks as follows in the British Isles: England (216th), Scotland (655th), Wales (304th), Ireland (1,223) and Northern Ireland (897th).

In England, it ranks highest in counties Suffolk and Essex. In Scotland, the surname ranks highest in Inverness-shire. In Wales, it ranks highest in Montgomeryshire. In Ireland, it ranks highest in county Donegal. In Northern Ireland, it ranks highest in county Tyrone.

The name is also present throughout the remainder English speaking world:  Canada (754th), New Zealand (225th), Australia (287th), and South Africa (838th).

Henry Brougham Guppy’s 1890 book Homes of Family Names in Great Britain states the following in regard to this last name: “This name has two principal areas: one in the south – eastern and eastern coast counties of England south of the Humber, Kent, Suffolk, and Norfolk containing the name in the greatest frequency; the other, a less important area, situated in the counties lying on and in the vicinity of the Welsh border, Cheshire possessing the largest number. Evidently this surname has characterised the eastern coast counties of England for several centuries. Derived from Hamo, a well – known Domesday personal name, we find it in the form of Hamo, Hamon, Hamond, Hammund, etc., during the reign of Edward I. in the same eastern coast counties where it is now established, namely in Norfolk, Kent, and Lincoln; it also occurred at that time as Hamon in the county of Cambridge. (Hundred Rolls.) The circumstance of this name having been established in the same part of England since the thirteenth century is one of considerable interest”.

Early Bearers of the Surname
The earliest documented bearer of this last name was Walter Hamund (Free Rolls of Herefordshire, 1242 AD). The Hundred Rolls of 1273 AD, a census of Wales and England, known in Latin as Rotuli Hundredorum lists four bearers of this surname: Hamo/Hammund de Curson (Salop), Adelina filius Hamund (Huntingdonshire), Alan Hamund (Oxfordshire), and William filius Hamund (Lincolnshire).  Richard Hamond of Sussex was listed in the Subsidy Tax rolls of 1332 AD. In the Anglo Saxon Chronicles, Heáhmund, bishop of Sherborne, was killed in a battle in 871 AD. A Stephen Hamon or Hammon was recorded in Normandy in the Magni Rotuli Scaccarrii Normanniae (1180-1198). A one John Hamon was recorded in England in 1272.

Hammond Family Tree & Hammond Genealogy
following is a discussion of six different noble, royal, landed, or aristocratic families bearing this last name.

Hammond of St. Alban’s Court
The lineage or ancestry of this branch of the Hammond family tree traces back to John Hammond who was a tenant to the Abbott of St. Albans during the reign of King Henry VII of England. He had a son named Thomas who purchased the manor of St. Albans, Kent, England in 1551. Thomas had a son named Edward. This Edward Hammond was an Esquire of St. Alban’s Court, elder brother of Thomas, and he married Katherine, daughter of John Shelley of Patsham, and had two daughters and six sons with her. His eldest son, Sir William Hammond, of St. Alban’s Court, knighted 1608, married Elizabeth, daughter of Anthony Aucher of Bishopsbourne and Margaret Sandys. He had five daughters (one married Sir Thomas Stanley and another married Sir John Marsham) and three sons: Anthony, Edward, and William. He died in 1615 and was succeeded by his eldest son, Anthony. This Anthony Hammond was an Esquire of St. Alban’s Court, and he married Anne, daughter of Sir Dudley Digges of Chilham Castle, and had several daughters and four sons with her: 1) William (hiss successor), 2) Dudley, 3) Anthony (of Somersham Place, had a son named Anthony who was Commissioner of the Navy during the reign of Queen Anne, nicknamed Silvertongued Hammond, had grandchildren Thomas, James) and 4) Edward (died at sea). He died in 1661 and was succeeded by his eldest son William. William was an Esquire of St. Alban’s Court and he married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Marsham, Baronet. He had issue named William, Anthony, John (Barrister at Law, had daughter named Elizabeth), Elizabeth (married Oliver St. John), and Anne (married Dr. William Wooton). He died and was succeeded by his eldest son William. This William Hammond was an Esquire of St. Alban’s Court. He first married Elizabeth, daughter of John Kingsford, and had a son with her named Anthony. He died in 1717 and was succeeded by this son. Antony was an Esquire of St. Alban’s Court who married his cousin, Catherine Kingsford, and had an only child. He died in 1722 and was succeeded by this only child: William Hammond. This William was an Esquire of St. Alban’s Court was born in 1721. He married Charlotte, daughter and co-heiress of William Egerton, grandson of John, 2nd Earl of Bridgewater, and had issue. He died in 1772 and was succeeded by elder son. This son, William Hammond, was an Esquire of St. Alban’s Court was born in 1752. In 1785, he married Elizabeth, eldest daughter and co-heiress of Osmond Beauvoir of Canterbury, with his wife Anne, daughter and co-heiress of John Boys of Hoad Court, and had the following children with her: 1) William Osmund, 2) Maximilian Dudley Digges Dalison of Hamptons, 3) Elizabeth Mary (married Captain William Haigh of the Royal Marines), 4) Mary (married Charles Allix of Willoughby Hall in county Lincoln, had issue), 5) Charlotte Jemima (married John Nethercote of Moulton Grange), 6) Julia Jemima, and 7) Jemima Julia (married Reverend Thomas Clayton Glyn of Dunington House). He died in 1829 and was succeeded by his son. This son, William Osmund Hammond, was an Esquire of St. Alban’s Court, Justice of Peace, Deputy Lieutenant, and High Sheriff who was born in 1790. In 1815, he married 1) William Oxeden, 2) Reverend Egerton Douglas (Rector of Sundridge in county Kent, married Katherine Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Whitemore, had issue named William, Egerton, Minna, Annie, and Florence), 3) Maximilian Montagu (Captain Rifle Brigade, married Ann Rosa, daughter of George Pennington, and was killed with the Redan, had daughters Nina Charlotte, Millicent, and Rosa Pennington), 4) Reverend Henry Anthony (married Katharine Deacon, had issue Henry Deacon, John Maximilian, Katharine Mary, Dorothy Egerton, and Katharine Charlotte Deacon), 5) Mary Elizabeth, 6) Charlotte Anna Maria, and 7) Fanny Anne Charlotte. He died in 1863. His son, William Oxenden Hammond was an Esquire of St. Alban’s Court, Kent, England, was a Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant, born in 1822. He also served in the Rifle Brigade and the 17th Lancers. The Hammond coat of arms is blazoned as follows in the medieval art of Heraldry: (Granted by Barker, Garter King-of-Arms, to Thomas Hammond, of Nonington, 1548, 2 Edward VI) Argent, on a chevron sable between three pellets, each charged with a martlet of the field, as many escallops shells or, a border engrailed vert. Crest: An eagle’s head erased sable enfiled with a rose gules, the rose issuing rays or. Motto: Pro rege patria. This branch of the family was seated at St. Alban’s Court, near Wingham, county Kent, England in present day United Kingdom (once called Great Britain).

Hammond of Wistaston
The genealogy traces back to Thomas Walthall, a descendant of the Walthalls of Walthall, county Westmorland, who lived during the reign of King Henry VII. Thomas married Margaret, daughter of Sir William Stanley of Hooton and had two sons with her: Thomas and Roger. The elder son, Thomas, was an Esquire who married Alice, daughter and co-heiress of John Marchomley. His heir was Peter Walthall, an Esquire of Wistaston, who married Anne, daughter of Reverend Dr. Brooke (Dean of Chester), with whom he left no issue. When he died in 1818, the estates went to his nephew: James Walthall Hammond, Esquire. James was the son of James Hammond and Amabelia Walthall. James married Penelope, daughter of Thomas Hector, and had two issue with her: James Walthall (see below) and Penelope (married Delves Broughton). He died in 1822 and was succeeded by his son James. James Walthall Hammond was an Esquire of Wistaston Hall in county Chester, England, who was born in 1805. He died in 1854 and was succeeded by his sister, Penelope. Penelope, in 1847, married Edward Delves Broughton, and had issue with her, including a son named Edward Walthall Delves Broughton who was born in 1848. The Hammond family crest for this branch of the family is blazoned as follows: Per chevron engrailed gules and argent, three ox heads proper. Crest: A boar passant proper.

Hamond of Harling Houser and Pampisford Hall
The Hamond genealogy or ancestry of this branch of the family traces back to Sir William Hamond, Knight of Carshalton, a South Sea Director who died in 1747 at the age of 77. With his wife Mary, he had had three sons: William, Peter, and John. His eldest son, William Hamond, was an Esquire and Turkey Merchant who married Anne, daughter of John Ashe of Freshford, county Somerset, and had three issue with her as follows: William, Cordwill, and Peter (married Anne Jarman, had a daughter named Anne who married Somerset Davies of Croft Castle). His eldest son, William Hamond, was an Esquire of Carshalton who married his cousin, Elizabeth, daughter of William Parker and Elizabeth Parker (Stringer), and four children with her as follows: 1) William Parker, 2), Edmond, 3) Reverend Peter Ashton (Rector of Widford, Hertsfordshire, and South Mimms, Middlsex), and 4) Francis Thomas (Rector of Widford and Quidenham, married Maria Lovelace, had a son named Reverend William who married a daughter of General Budgen). His eldest son, William Parker Hamond, Esquire of Haling, in 1790, married Mary, daughter of Sir Robert Carr, Baronet, and had issue with her as follows: 1) William Parker (of Hayling), 2) Robert Carr (officer in the 14th Dragoon), 3) Edmund Glyn (Fellow of Jesus College at Cambridge, Rector of Widford), 4) Peter (General of Madras Artillery, married Christina Mary Bird, had issue named William Carr, Captain Robert Thomas, Reverend Peter Francis, Mary Christina, Louisa Anne, Sophia Mary, and Christina), 5) Francis (a Midshipman in the Royal Navy, born 1804), 6) George (an officer in India, born in 1804, married Mary Brouncker of Boverirdge, had son named George William Brouncker), 7) Henry (Rector of Widford, married Sophia Edridge, had issue named Henry Carr, Captain William, and Isabella Elizabeth), 8) Isabella Jane (married Captain James Rolleston of the Royal Navy), and 9) Louisa Grace (married George Dering of Barham Court). He died in 1812 and was succeeded by his eldest son William. This son, William Parker Hamond, was an Esquire of Haling House and Pampisford Hall, county Cambridge, as well as a Justice of the Peace for Herts, Deputy Lieutenant, and High Sheriff, who was born in 1793. In 1824, he married Margaret, daughter of John Maling of The Grange, and had only one son named William. He died and was succeeded by his son William in 1873. William Parker Hamond was an Esquire of Haling House, county Surrey, and Pampisford Hall, county Cambridge, who was born in 1827. He was a Barrister-at-Law, Justice of Peace, and Deputy Lieutenant. The Hamond coat of arms or family crest is blazoned in the medieval art of heraldry as follows: Per pale gules and azure, three demi-lions passant guardant or. Crest: A wolf’s head erased quarterly or and azure. Motto: Vis fortibus arma. This branch of the family was seated at Haling House, Croydown, county Surrey, and Pampisford Hall, county Cambridge, England, in present day United Kingdom (once known as Great Britain).

Hamond of Westacre
The lineage or ancestry of this branch of the Hammond family tree traces back to great anqiquity in county Norfolk, England. Edmund Hamond died in about 1605 and he had a great-grandson named Anthony Hamond. This Anthony married Susan, daughter of Robert Walople (Member of Parliament for Castle Rising), and had three sons with her. He died in 1743 and was succeeded by his eldest son, Richard. Richard died in 1776 without an heir, at which time the estates went to his nephew Anthony. Anthony Hamond, Esquire, was the son of Robert Hamond and Elizabeth Swan. He married Polly Amelia Hayne and had one son with her, Richard, who was born in 1773 and lived in Holland. He later married Sarah, daughter and co-heiress of Philip Case of King’s Lynn, and had the following issue with her: 1) Sarah, 2) Susan (married Henry Elwes of Colesbourne), 3) Antony, 4) Philip, and Robert. He was succeeded by his son Philip. Philip Hamond, Esquire of Westacre, in 1803, married Anne, daughter of Charles James Packe of Prestwold, and had the following children with her: 1) Anthony, 2) Robert Nicolas (of Fakenham, married Sophia Caroline Musters, had issue Robert Nicholas, Nicholas, Sophy, and Blanche), 3) Richard, 4) Philip (Captain in the Army), 5) Frances Anne, 6) Susan Maria, 7) Ahmeria (married Reverend Robert Scott Surtees), and 8) Emily (married John George C. Musters, Esquire). He died in 1824 and was succeeded by his eldest son, Anthony. This Anthony Hamond was an Esquire of Westacre, Justice of the Peace, Deputy Lieutenant, and High Sheriff who was born in 1805. In 1828, he married Mary Anne, daughter of John Chaworth Musters of Colwick and Mary Anne Chaworth, and had issue with her as follows: 1) Anthony, 2) Philip, 3) Richard Horace (Royal Navy), 4) Thomas Astley Horace, 5) Mary Anne (married Henry Birbeck of Stoke, Holy Cross in 1849), 6) Frances, 7) Susan Maria, 8) Caroline Penelope (married Reverend J. Harbord, Rector of West Harling), 9) Catherine Sarah (married Sommerville A. Gurney of Field, Lynn), 10) Fanny, 11) Susan Maria, and 12) Emily (married Charles Wigley Wicksted). He died in 1869. His son, Anthony Hamond was an Esquire of Westacre High House, a Justice of the Peace, and Deputy Lieutenant who was born in 1834. In 1874, he married Mary Leigh, daughter of Sir Thomas Hare, Baronet. The Hamond arms are blazoned as follows: Azure, between two chevronels three doves or. Crest: On a rocky mount proper, a dove argent, holding in the beak a slip of olive vert. This family was seated at Westacre High House, near Swaffham, Norfolk, England.

Hamond of Over Dinsdale
John Leonard Hammond was an Esquire, son of Anthony Hammond of Over Dinsdale Hall, Hutton Bonville, and Jane Close of Richmond, who was born in 1799. In 1838, he married Mary, daughter of John Aspinall of Standon Hall. He was a Magistrate for the North Riding of Yorkshire and for county Durham, England. This family was previously of Norfolk. His daughter Mary, in 1857, married Edward Nicholas, son of Sir William Heygate, Baronet. The lineage or genealogy is traced back to Anthony Ewbanke of Hutton Bonville and Richmond, York, the son of John Ewbanke and Jane Hammond. The coat of arms of this branch of the family is blazoned as follows: Argent, on a chevron, sable, between three ogresses, each charged with a martlet, of the field, three escallop shells, or, all within a bordure, engrailed, vert. Crest: A hawk’s head, collared gules, rays issuing, or. Motto: Pro Rege et patria. This family was seated at St. Alban’s Court, near Wingham, county Kent, England.

Hamond-Graeme Baronets
According to Wikipedia,The Hamond, later Hamond-Graeme Baronetcy, of Holly Grove in the County of Berkshire, was a title in the Baronetage of Great Britain. It was created on 18 December 1783 for the Royal Navy officer Andrew Hamond. His son, the second Baronet, was an Admiral of the Fleet. The third Baronet assumed the additional surname of Graeme in 1873. The title became extinct in 1969 on the death of the fifth Baronet”. Sir Andrew Hamond, 1st Baronet, was a Captain of the Navy who was also the Governor of Nova Scotia from 1781-1782, born in Blackheath, London, England, the son of Robert Hamond and Susannah Snaple. In 1779, he married Anne Graema, and had two children with her: Caroline and Sir Graham Hamond, 2nd Baronet. The son, Sir Graham, was Admiral of the Fleet who commanded numerous naval battles during the French Revolutionary Wars and Napoleonic Wars. He was followed by the following:
Sir Andrew Snape Hamond-Graeme, 3rd Baronet (1811–1874)
Sir Graham Eden William Graeme Hamond-Graeme, 4th Baronet (1845–1920)
Sir Egerton Hood Murray Hamond-Graeme, 5th Baronet (1877–1969)

Other Hammond Pedigree & Family Trees
One of the earliest known ancestor or progenitor of this family was Richard de Pulford, who was born in Pulford, Broxley Hundred, county Cheshire, England in 1150 AD. He married Margery Frodsham, daughter of Robert le Chaumbleng, and had a son with her. This son was Sir Robert Hammond de Pulford who was born in Pulford, Broxley Hundred, Cheshire, England in 1170 AD. He married Elizabeth Corbet and “Emma of Cheshire”. He had the following issue: Tibot, Robert IV, Radulph, Isabel, Hugh “le Clerc”, Nichola, Robert, and Herbert. His son, Robert IV, was born in Pulford around 1214 AD. He married Jane, and had the following children with her: Sir Robert Hammond, Knight of Pulford, Hugh de Pulford, and John de Pulford. His son, Sir Robert Hammond, was born in the same town around 1230 AD. He married Elizabeth Oddyle and had issue with her as follows: Ralph, Jonet, and Tibod. His son Ralph married Elizabeth Fuller and had a son with her named John. John was born in 1290 AD. He married Lady Agnes Bardolph and they had a son named Thomas. This son, Thomas Hammond Sr., was born in England around 1310 AD. He married Grace Thomas and had a son also named Thomas. Thomas Hammond Jr. was born in Lavenham, county Suffolk, England who was born around 1340 AD. He married Cycely Hammond, Countess De Alycel. He had a son named John. This son, John William Hammond I, was born in Suffolk in 1366. He married and had a son named John. This son, John William Hammond II, was born in Lawshall, Suffolk in 1419. He married a woman named Joan and had a son named John. John William III was born in Lawshall around 1450. He had a son named John as well. This son, John Hammond IV, was born in Melford, Suffolk around 1475. He married Johanna, daughter of Johann Hans Heimbach who was born in Siegen, Nordrhein-Westfalen, and had three children with her: John V, Maryane King, and Johanna. His son, John V, was born in Lavenham, Suffolk, in 1499. He married Katherine (surname unknown) and Agnes Garrold, and had the following children with her: Robert I, Joan, Magaret Johane, Robert, John, Thomas I, Elizabeth, and Jean. His son, Robert Hammond I, was born in Norfolk around 1524 AD. He married Agnes Ann Penton and had a son with her named Robert. This son, Robert II, was born in Norfolk in 1566. He married Margaret Sheppard and had a son with her named Francis. Francis Hammond I was born in Norfolk around 1590 AD. He married Frances and had a son named John. This son, John Hammond I, was born in St. Gregory by St. Paul in London in 1611. He married Mary Allen and Dorothy Latham and had issue as follows: Mary, John, Margaret, Ann, and James. His son John was born in Clerkenwell, St. James Parish, Greater London in 1642 and passed away in 1721.

Simon or Symon Hammond was born in England around 1570 AD. He married Joan Ray and had a son with her named Simon. This son, Simon Hammond, was born around 1598. He married Ann Newce and had a son with her named Martin. Martin Hammond was born in St. Mary Le Bow, London, England in 1619. He married Mary Allen and had sons named Job and John. He arrives in Virginia, colonial America, in 1639. His son Jon Hammond was born in Richmond County, Virginia around 1645. He married Elizabeth Haynie and had a son with her, also named Job. Job II was born in North Farnham Parish, Richmond, Virginia in 1677. He married Amadine Baylis in 1703 and had the following children with her: Thomas, Susanna (Davis), Elizabeth (Morris), Mersy, Amadine (Elder), Samuel, Jarvis, Job III, and Obediah Jefferson Sr. His son, Captain Samuel Hammond, was born in Richmond, VA in 1722. He served in the American Revolution. He married Mary Elizabeth Jenkins and had the following children with her: Marvin, Job, Samuel II, John, Raleigh, and Charlotte Lois (Collins). His son Raleigh or Rawleigh was born in Fairfax, VA in 1756. He married Mary G. Burford and later Margaret Johnston and had the following children with her: Samuel, Mildred G. (Brewer), Frances (Perry), and Mary Burford (Hughes). His son Samuel Burford Hammond was born in North Carolina in 1782. He married Frances Sims, Nancy Adeline Twitty, and Elizabeth Baskin. He had three sons: Leroy, Francis, and Edwin M. His son Edwin M. Hammond was born in Kershaw, South Carolina in 1818. He married Mary Missouri Coile and had three sons with her: William Jesse Taylor Jr., Francis Samuel, and Edwin C.G. His son, William Jesse Taylor Hammond Sr., was born in Kosciusko, Attala, Mississippi. He married Mary Elizabrth Garrigues and had issue with her as follows: James Amzi, Gillie Antoinette (Sparkman), William Jesse Jr., Victor, Alice Meek, Elma Sue, and others. He served in the American Civil War and was part of the 13th Regiment of Mississippi Infantry. His son Victor Hammond was born in the same town in 1876 and passed away in 1954.

Early American and New World Settlers
The book Genealogical Guide to the Early Settlers, mentions 13 bearer of this last name, sometimes spelled Hammons or Hammand.
1) Benjamin Hammond of Yarmouth 1643, said to have come from London and to be the son of William and Elizabeth (a sister of Wiliam Penn), but this might not be the same. He was at Sandwich. He was married in 1650. He moved to Rochester. He had a son named John born in 1663.
2) George Hammond of Newport, was on a list of freemen in 1655
3) John Hammond of Scituate, 1643
4) John Hammond of Gloucester whose surname was also spelled Hamons, Haman, or Heman. In 1660, he married Mary, daughter of Morris (or Maurice) Somes. He had children named Elizabeth, John (1664), Mary (1666), Timothy (1668), and William (1674).
5) John Hammond of Watertown, the son of William, was brought to colonial America by his mother when he was 7 years old aboard the Francis in 1634. He was a lieutenant. He married Abigal and had issue named John (1654), Elizabeth (1655), and Abigail (1658). His second wife was Sarah Nichols who he married at Charlestown in 1664. He had issue with her named Sarah, John, Hannah, Nathaniel, Samuel, and Hepibah. He was a selectman in 1664 and after. The author states: ”He was the richest man in town”.
6) Joseph Hammond of Kittery, 1680, was the brother of the previously mentioned John. He was a lieutenant. He had a son named Joseph in 1677 and have two daughters who outlived him. He was taken prisoner by the French in Canada in 1695. His wife was Catharine, daughter of Nicholas Frost. His daughter Dorcas married Robert Cutts Jr.
7) Lawrence Hammond of Charlestown, artillery company in 1666, a freeman that years as well. In 1662, he married Audrey Eaton who came from London. He had a son named Francis with her prior to her death. In 1665, he married Abigail, daughter of Deacon Edward Collins of Medford and had issue with her named Martha, Jane (1670), and Elizabeth (1672). His second wife died and in 1675, he married Margaret, but had no children with her. This third wife also passed and he married Ann, widow of William Gerrish, in 1685 and had issue with her named Lawrence and Francis. He moved to Boston, Massachusetts and died in 1699.
8) Richard Hammond of Kennebeck in 1665, was killed by Indians in 1676. His widow was named Elizabeth.
9) Thomas Hammond of Hingham in 1636, brother of William, was baptized in 1587 and born in Lavenham, county Suffolk, England. He was a freeman in 1637. He married Elizabeth around 1623 and brought his children Elizabeth, Thomas, Sarah, and Nathaniel to colonial America. He moved to Watertown and then to Cambridge village in 1650. He purchased a large farm with Vincent Druce and died in 1675 at the age of 88 years. He had a very good estate.
10) William Hammond of Watertown around 1632. He was a freeman in 1636 and had a good estate. He died in 1662 at the age of 87. In 1605, he married Elizabeth Payne and had issue with her as follows: William (1607), Ann (1609), John (1611), Ann (1616), Thomas (1618).
11) William Hammond of Lynn, 1636, died the next year
12) William Hammond of Wells, 1656, or perhaps earlier, a grand juror, clerk of the writs, commissioner and a “man of consequence”. He had issue named Jonathan and Joseph, as well as others. He died in 1702.
13) William Hammond was killed by Indians in 1675 in the fourth day of King Philip’s War. He may have lived in Rehoboth.

Other settlers in colonial America who came in the eighteenth century include: Edward Hammond (Virginia 1714), George Hammond (Pennsylvania 1765), Joseph Hammond (Maryland 1774), Martha Hamond (Virginia 1702), George Hamond (South Carolina 1716), and Captain Hammond (Boston 1766).

In Canada, some of the earliest settlers with this last name include: Philip Hamond (Nova Scotia 1750), Ezra Hammond (Nova Scotia 1749), Ann Hammond (Nova Scotia 1750), and Philip Hammond (Nova Scotia 1750). In Australia, Thomas Hammond, a convict from Middlesex, England who came to New South Wales aboard the Asia in 1822. William Hammond was also a convict from the same county, and he came to New South Wales aboard the Albion in 1826. In 1831, Thomas Hammond, a convict from London, England, came to Van Diemen’s Land (present day Tasmania) aboard the Argyle. In New Zealand, James Hammond came to Auckland and William Hammond came to Wellington in 1840. Matthew Hammond, a farmer aged 30 years, came to the city of Wellington aboard the George Frye in 1842.

Early Americans Bearing the Hammond Family Crest
Charles Bolton’s American Armory (1927) contains one entry for this surname:
1) Argent on a chevron sable between 3 ogresses, each charged with a martlet of the field 3 escallops [or], all within a bordure gules. Motto: Tentenda via est. Bookplate William Churchill Hammond, Holyoke, Mass.

Matthew’s American Armoury and Bluebook (1907) contains one entry for this surname:
1) George Hammond McLean of New York City, son of James Monroe McLean and Louisa Theresa Williasm, was born in 1849. He was the Vice President of Citizens’ Insurance Co., Director of Manhattan Life Insurance, co, and was Captain in the Old Guard. In 1878, he married Harriet Amelia, daughter of Henry Dater of New York, and had two issue with her: James Clarence Hammond (1879) and Alan Dater (1889). Arms: Quarterly, 1st Argent, a lion rampant gules; 2nd; azure, a castle triple-towered argent with flags displayed gules holding a crosslet fitchee azure; 4th, or, a galley her sails furled sable flag gules, on a sea vert a salmon naint argent. Crest: A battle-ax erect ion pale, crossed by a branch of laurel and cypress in saltire all proper Motto: Altera merces.

Crozier’s General Armory (1904) contains one entry for this surname:
1) Benjamin Hammond, Rochester, Massachusetts, 1634, originally from St. Alban’s, Kent, England. Azure, three demilions passant guardant or. Crest: A wolf’s head erased quarterly per fesse, indented or and azure.

Mottoes
I have identified four Hammond family mottoes:
1) Per tot discrimina rerum (through all manner of calamitous events)*
2) Pro rege et patria (For my king and country)
3) Paratus et fidelis (Read and faithful)*
4) Tentenda via est (The course must be attempted)

*from Virgil, an ancient Roman poet
**This was the motto of Sir G. Eden Hammond, assumed in 1783. Sir Edward Sharpe Hamond, for twelve years Comptroller of the Navy, when he was created a baronet for his good services during the American war, and was specially granted a naval coronet, issuant therefrom an eagle’s head, sable.

Grantees
We have 20 coats of arms for the Hammond surname depicted here. These 20 blazons are from Bernard Burke’s book The General Armory of England, Ireland, and Scotland, which was published in 1848. The bottom of this page contains the blazons, and in many instances contains some historical, geographical, and genealogical about where coat of arms was found and who bore it. People with this last name that bore a Hammond Coat of Arms (or mistakenly called the Hammond Family Crest)
1) Edward Hamon of South Wotton, along with brothers Richard and Nicholas, the sons of Anthony, granted by T. St. George in 1698.
2) James Hammond of county Salop, grant 30 April 1562, by Hervey
3) John Hamond of Upton, county Suffolk, granted by Cooke
4) John Hammond of Cambridge, doctor to Henry, Price of Wales, 1607-9, granted by R. St. George.
5) John Hammond of Cherley Abbey, son of Thomas, son of Giles, son of William (of Whaley, county Lanc.), son of Thomas (of Ferrybridge, Yorkshire)
6) William Hamond of Guilford, Surrey, crest granted 10 August 1558 by Hervey

Notables
There are hundreds of notable people with the Hammond or Hamond surname. This page will mention a handful. Famous people with this last name include: 1) Abram Adams Hammond (1814-1874) who was the 12th Governor of Indian from 1860-1861, having been born in Vermont, 2) Christopher Andrew Hammond (1966) who was a former baseball pitcher in the MLB who played for seven different teams (ex. Florida Marlins) from 1990-2006, born in Atlanta, Georgia, 3) Winfield Scott Hammond (1863-1915) who was the 18th Governor of Minnesota in 1915 and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for Minnesota from 1907-1915), born in Southborough, Massachusetts, 4) Lloyd Blaine Hammond Jr. (1952) who was an American NASA astronaut and United States Air Force officer, born in Savannah, Georgia, 5) Henry Hammond (1605-1660) who was an English cleric who supported the Royalist Cause during the English Civil War, 6) Dean John Hammond (1983) who is an English football (soccer) who played for several teams between 2008-2016, including Bright & Hove Albion, 7) Samuel Hammond (1757-1842) who was an American Lieutenant in the Revolutionary War, a governor of the Louisiana and Missouri Territories, and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for Georgia from 1803-1805, born in Richmond, Virginia, 8) Marlene Hammond who was an All-American Girls Professional Baseball League player who played for the Kalamazoo Lassies in 1954, 9) James Henry Hammond (1807-1864) who was a member of the US House of Representatives from 1835-1836), the 60th Governor of South Carolina (1842-1844), and a US Senator from South Carolina from 1857-1860, and 10) Darryl Hammond (1967-2017) who was an American football player in the Arena Football League from 1989-2016, born in Tappanhannock, Virginia

Hammond Coat of Arms Meaning

Two of the main heraldic symbols depicted within the Hammond Coat of Arms (incorrectly referred to as the Hammond Family Crest or Hammond Family Shield) are the lion and crescent, each which have their own unique meaning.

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head) occurs very frequently in heraldry. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome “hazardous things by force and courage”. In ancient Egypt, priests wore leopard skins to ward off evil spirits. In ancient Greece, the god Dionysis is often depicted riding a leopard and/or wearing its skin. In ancient times, the leopard was called “the Great Watcher” as the many spots represented eyes.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose, and the crescent is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honor by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory”. It is said it represent a person who was honored and enlighten by their sovereign (King). Some say the symbol is Islamic in nature and was brought back to Europe by Knights returning from the Crusades in the Holy Land during the Middle Ages. It’s interesting to note that many ancient cultures, such as the Egyptians, revered the moon. This half moon shape is often used as a mark of cadency (the status of a younger branch of the family) to denote one’s second son.

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