Hamon Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hamon Family Coat of Arms

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Hamon Coat of Arms Meaning

Hamon Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Hammon.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Hamon. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Hamon Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Hamon blazon are the lion, chevron, spear and buglehorn. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and azure .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 11A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.14The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 16Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The spear or lance is a typical example, often borne (for obvious reasons) in allusion to the crucifixtion. 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111 Sometimes only the head is shown, and on other occasions the tilting or tournament spear is specified, familiar to us from many a jousting scene in the movies. 18A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Spear

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hamon Name

Hamon Origin:

England, Germany

Origins of Hamon:

This interesting and unique name is of English source, and has three possible origins, the first being from the Norman personal name “Hamo(n),” from the Germanic “Haimo,” with the first component “haim” which means home, the “d” being excrescent. The name was brought into England by the Normans after the Conquest of 1066. The second origin is from the Old Norse particular name “Hamundr,” a combination of the components “ha,” high, and “mund,” which means safety. The third origin is from the Old Norse particular name “Amundr,” which is a combination of the components “a,” which means great-grandfather, offsprings, and “mund,” which means protection. This name was not as usual as “Ha, mundr” and it is sometimes confused with it. Both names were brought into England between the 8th and 9th Centuries. The new surname can appear noted as Hammond, Hammond, Hammant, Hamman, Hamon, and Hammon. An interesting name ancestor was one John Hammond (died 1617), who was a physician to James I (1603 – 1625). He made a fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1573.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hammon, Haymon, Heamon, Hamion, Hamoon, Hamoen, Hamoun, Hameon, Hamoni, Hamono.

England:

The surname Hamon first appeared in Kent. The Roll of Battle Abbey discloses that two brothers, sons or grandsons of Hamon Dentatus accompanied the invader in his invasion. The first was Robert Fitz-Hamon, the great invader of Glamorganshire and the second was Haimon, named in the Domesday Book as “Dapifer,” for having received the office of King Steward for the King. The next passed away issueless while the older had four daughters, three of which had conventual lives. The remaining daughter named Mabel married Robert Fitzroy, commander of Gloucester. Hamon Dentatus had two other sons who were Richard of Granville and Creuquer who inherited the Barony of Chatham from Robert Fitz-Hamon and many of the Kentish lands of Hamon Dapifer. These lands inherited to Haimon de Crévequer (died 1208) who had one son Robert Haimon. The next attended the compact of Barons against Henry III., and as a reaction lost all his lands.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Walter Hamund, dated about 1242, in the “Free Rolls of Herefordshire.” It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Hamon had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Hamon landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th and 18th. Some of the people with the name Hamon who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Mathew Harnon, who landed in Virginia in 1622. Christ Harnon, who landed in Virginia in 1637. Peircey Hamon, who landed in Virginia in 1653. Ellin Hamon, who arrived in Virginia in 1655. Garrett Hamon, who landed in Virginia in 1656

The following century saw more Hamon surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Hamon who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Sara Hamon, who landed in Virginia in 1704. Willem Hamon, who landed in New York in 1709. Jacob Hamon, who arrived in North Carolina in 1764

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Hamon who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Joseph Hamon arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Avon” in 1860

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hamon: France 20,500; United States 2,079 ; Colombia 786 ; England 565 ; Canada 494 ; Germany 336 ; Brazil 270 ; Australia 258 ; Belgium 200 ; Jersey 184

Notable People:

Jean-Louis Hamon (May 1821 – 29 May 1874) was a French painter.

Benoit Hamon was born in June 1967, is a French political leader.

Hamon Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hamon family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Kent). Ar. two bends az. a bordure engr. sa.
2) Ar. a lion ramp. az.
3) Per pale az. and or, a chev. gu.
4) Az. three tilting spears in bend or, headed ar.
5) (Seigneurs of Samare’s, Jersey). Motto—En tout loyal. Az. a lion ramp. guard. or. Crest—A lion, as in the arms.
6) (arms of William Hamon, a Monk Prior, of Cogges, co. Oxford, set up in the church there. Visit. Oxon, 1574). Ar. a chev. gu. a chief az.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
11. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
14. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
16. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111
18. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Spear