Hand Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hand Family Coat of Arms

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Hand Coat of Arms Meaning

Hand Name Origin & History

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Hand Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hand blazon are the hand, chevron and lion. The four main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent, gules and azure.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The hand, unless we are told otherwise is a dexter (right) hand shown palm outwards and fingers upwards.11A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P305. It demonstrates faith, sincerity and justice, and in the form of two right hands clasped can mean union or alliance12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W Cecil Wade 1898 P92. There is a special form called the “Hand of Ulster” which is a sinister hand gules on an argent background (a left hand, red upon white). Originally the Badge of Ulster, the Province of Northern Ireland, it has come to be used as an addition to existing arms, in an escutcheon (small shield) or canton (small square) to indicate that the holder is also a Baronet.13Heraldry Historical and Popular, Charles Boutell, 1864 P56

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.15The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 17A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 18Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 19Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 20A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 21The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hand Name

HAND

The name Hand is believed to have originated from two separate sources. The first, which relates to the Anglo-Saxon surname is believed to have originated from the medieval “hond” which translates to hand. The name is thought to have been an occupational nickname given to someone who was a skilled craftsman or whose profession required the person to work a great deal with their hands. The second source, suggest the surname Hand may have been a patronymic name originating in Holland. It is believed to have derived from the given name Hans whose meaning would have translated into “Son of.” European medieval culture was a patriarchal society, which meant most surnames descend through a male line of descent.

Derivatives of this name include; Hand, Hands, Hande, and Handes among others. The variation in spelling of names during this time period can be attributed to a lack of continuity regarding guidelines for spelling which was compounded by the diversity of languages in use in European countries at this time.

The first record of the name Hand, is of Walter Handes which appears in the Warwickshire “Pipe Rolls” from 1332. The Pipe Rolls often times called the “Great Rolls,” these were a series of financial tax records kept by the English Treasury by order of King Henry I, with the oldest dating back to the 12th century. They hold the distinction of being the oldest consecutive set of records detailing English governance in the United Kingdom. These records span a period of over 700 years and have proven invaluable to researches over the years.

The first recorded immigrant to America bearing the surname Hand or any variation of the spelling was Thomas Hand who landed and settled in Virginia in 1621. Robert and Thomas Hand landed and settled in Virginia in 1635. John Hand landed in 1635 and settled in Lynn Massachusetts. John Hand, along with eight other men, bought Montauk Point Long Island and established the town of East Hampton.

Early immigrants to Canada include Peter Hand who landed in 1749 and settled in Nova Scotia. Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Hand arrived in 1783 and settled in New Brunswick as did John Hand and his young daughter Phoebe.

Worldwide, the highest concentration of people with the surname Hand are found in Ireland, the British Commonwealth, and the United States of America; by state, the largest number of those with the surname Hand, live in Alabama USA.

There are many persons of note who bear the surname Hand. Bishop Sir Geoffrey David Hand, KBE was born in Australia and was the first Archbishop of the Anglican Church of Papua New Guinea. Hand attended Oriel College at Oxford University where he received a degree in history, he then went on to Ripon Theological College. Upon completion of his studies in 1942, he was ordained a deacon and in 1943 he was ordained a priest. In 1946, Hand moved to Papua New Guinea where he would spend sixty years of his life serving his congregation. In 1950, he was made a bishop, this made him the youngest bishop in the Anglican Church. For his service and contribution to humanity, Bishop Hand was awarded the honor of Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1975 and the Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1984.

David Hand is a renowned British mathematician and statistician. He has had numerous books published based on findings of his research relating to finance, statistics, and measurement. He has served as a professor at Open University and Imperial College in London where he taught statistics, The Royal Statistical Society awarded him the Guy Medal in Silver in 2002. In 2003, Hand was made a Fellow of the British Academy. He also served as the President of the Royal Statistical Society from 2008 until 2009 and then again in 2010. In 2013, for services to research and innovation, Hand was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE).

Frederic Hand is an American composer and classical guitarist. Hand attended Mannes College of Music. He received a Fulbright scholarship which allowed him to travel abroad to England and studied with Julian Bream who is considered one of the foremost classical guitarist of the 20th century. His many achievements include; being the official guitarist in residence for the Metropolitan Opera in

New York for the past 20 years, Department Chair for Classical Guitar at State University of

New York, faculty member at Mannes College of Music, composer for musical scores of television and feature films, an Emmy award winning composer, and a Grammy Award nominee.

Hand Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hand family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Ar. a chev. az. betw. three dexter hands gu. Crest—A stag trippant ppr.
2) (Dublin; Symond Hand, merchant; Fun. Ent. 1640, of his dau. Ellenor, wife of Robert Jordan, Esq., of Barbestown, co. Dublin). Chequy ar. and sa. a lion ramp. az. armed and langued gu. holding betw. the paws a dexter hand couped at the wrist ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
11. A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P305
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W Cecil Wade 1898 P92
13. Heraldry Historical and Popular, Charles Boutell, 1864 P56
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
15. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
17. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
18. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
19. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
20. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
21. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60