Hanson Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hanson Family Coat of Arms

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Hanson Coat of Arms Meaning

Hanson Name Origin & History

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Hanson Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Hanson blazon are the martlet, mascle, lion and chevron. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, sable and azure .

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

The mascle is a close relative of the lozenge or diamond shape, but with the centre cut away revealing the background underneath. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mascle. Guillim, writing in the 17th century reckoned the mascle to represent the mesh of a net, being the biblical symbol for “persuasion, whereby men are induced to virtue and verity”. 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 15Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 16A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hanson Name

Hanson Origin:

England, Ireland, Denmark, Norway, Jewish

Origins of Name:

The Hanson surname derives from the same name found in Norway, Denmark and German border towns of Denmark. The Swedish version of the name is Hansson. In England the surname Hanson was thought to have meant “son of Hann”. The surname was a popular personal name in Yorkshire during the 13th century. It could also have been an abbreviated version of the Hebrew name Hannah. Eventually the names Hansen and Hanson would arrive in North America.

The name is either derived from the name of the father or mother. From the father it derives from Han, a Flemish version of John that comes from the Hebrew name “Yochanan”. Yochanan means “Jehovah has favoured me with a son”.

From the mother it derives from Hann, a medieval female given name and shorter version of the name Hannah. It comes from the Hebrew name Chana meaning “God has favoured me”.

Variations:

More common variations are:

Jenson, Johns, Janes, Jenkinson, Johnes, Joanes, Johncock, John, Jenks, Grosjean, Prettyjohn, Micklejohn, Properjohn, Hanison, Hainson, Hansson, Haneson, Hanason, Hannson, Hansohn, Hansone, Hansona, Haunson

History:

England:

The origins of Hanson in England is thought to be near Yorkshire, close to Halifax where a local named Roger de Rastrick owned land. His son Henry had a boy named John and the surname Henson was given (the son of Henry). This surname would eventually develop into Hanson.

The first known recording of the Hanson surname is in Yorkshire in the early part of the 14th century. William Hanneson in 1331 was recorded in the Patent Rolls of Yorkshire.

In 1379 Robert Hanson appeared in the Poll Tax Returns Records of Yorkshire.

In 1541, Richard Hanson was christened at Dewsbury, Yorkshire.

In the 15th century, the Hansons of Normanton had a timber frame house known as the Hanson House which still stands today.

In the 17th century Christopher Hanson was recorded at Arthington in Addle parish. He was the ancestory and forefather of the Hanson traders in the Levant throughout the 19th century.

In 1848, Mary Hanson opened a horse drawn haulage business for wool in Huddersfield, Yorkshire. The business would remain for 100 years all the way up to James Edward Hanson, a famous businessman of the Margaret Thatcher era.

Canada:

John Hanson was a member of the British army in Quebec during the French and Indian War. He later moved to New Brunswick. Today, there are many descendants of his living in New Brunswick.

In the 1900s a large Scandinavian presence would appear in Canada due to the Dominions Land Act of 1902. Hans Hanson during the early part of the century settled in Clanwilliam, Abe Hanson settled in Swan River, Helmer and Ellert Hanson settled in Lajord, and Christoph Hansen settled in Saskatchewan.

Australia:

In the early part of the 19th century, two famous Danish Hansens would move to Victoria in search of gold.

Frederick Hansen, from a northern Germany Danish family arrived in Melbourne in 1855 in search of gold in the gold fields of Victoria. He would eventually marry and raise a large family in Upper Yarra.

John Hansen arrived in 1858 searching for gold in Ballarat and later New Zealand. He was one of the earliest settlers in Thames and would eventually open a general store.

United States:

John Hanson was a famous acting President during the revolutionary war. His grandfather was an indentured servant of English ancestry in 1661 and sold to Edward Keene in Maryland. The family became very wealthy and his son, Samuel Hanson who would own the Mulberry Grove plantation in Charles county.

His nephew would fight in the Revolutionary war, and his grandsons would all go on to fight in the American Civil War. One would become colonel in the Union army.

The late part of the 19th century saw a large migration of Hansons from Scandinavia, mainly to Minnesota and other Upper Midwest states.

Some of the first immgrants were Iver and Olina Hanson who arrived in Minnesota at the end of the 19th century and eventually migrated to Manitoba, Canada. Many Norwegians who emigrated to America would also end up in Manitoba.

Hanson Today:

United States 136,450

Ghana 18,292

Nigeria 17,118

England 13,992

Canada 9,713

Australia 5,418

Jamaica 2,463

Sweden 1,929

South Africa 1,370

New Zealand 1,044

Notable People:

Ove Verner Hansen (1932-2016), Danish opera singer and actor

Gunnar Hansen (1947-2015), Icelandic-born American actor and author,

Hroar Anton Hansen (1947-2015), Norwegian industrial leader and politician

Hans Hansen (1906-1960), Danish politician, Prime Minister of Denmark

Basil Hansen (1926-2015), Australian ice hockey player, 1960 Winter Olympics

Norman B. Hansen (1924-2014), American politician

George Vernon Hansen (1930-2014), Member of the U.S. House of Representatives

Bernhuff Hansen (1877 – 1950), American Olympic gold medalist for wrestling

Hanson Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hanson family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Abingdon, co. Berks, and London; Sir Robert Hanson, Lord Mayor of London 1675). Ar. three mascles (apother, lozenges) sa. on a chief of the second as many lions ramp. of the first. Crest—A lion ramp. sa. holding a mascle ar.
2) (Gilstead Hall, near Brentwood, co. Essex). Or, a chev. chequy ar. and az. betw. three martlets of the last. Crest—On a ducal coronet or, a dove close, holding in the beak a sprig of olive all ppr.
3) (Peckham, co. Surrey, and Rastricke and Woodhouse, co. York). Or, a chev. counter-componee ar. and az. betw. three martlets sa. Crests—On a chapeau az. turned up ar. a martlet, wings endorsed sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mascle
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
15. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
16. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60