Hardcastle Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hardcastle Family Coat of Arms

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Hardcastle Coat of Arms Meaning

Hardcastle Name Origin & History

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Hardcastle Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hardcastle blazon are the castle, leopard’s face and chevron. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and gules .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.6The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Architectural items, from individual components to entire buildings 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92 feature frequently as charges In a coat of arms. Not surprisingly, considering the times from which many arms date, fortifications are common. The castle is perhaps second only to the tower in this usage, and often described in some detail as to its construction, the disposition of windows and so on. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Castle Continental examples also sometimes include attackers on scaling ladders. Wade tells us that the appearance of a castle indicates “granduer and solidity” and one can understand why. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.15The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hardcastle Name

Hardcastle Origin:

England

Origins of Hardcastle:

This interesting name is of old English origin, and a geographical surname was derived from a place named as Hardcastle Cross in West Yorkshire, near Hebden overpass. The meaning of the place name is “the impenetrable castle,” acquired from the Middle English word “hard,” which means difficult, complicated, confused, sometimes “cheerless,” with “Castle,” which means fort, palace, or castle. Geographical Surnames were derived by the king of the palace, and local landholders, and ultimately by those old residents of a place who had shifted to another place, frequently in seek of work, and there best recognized by the name of their mother town. Yorkshire Parish Records registered the naming of Marmaduke, son of William Hardcastle, at Pateley Bridge, in February 1555, and the wedding of Barthalomue Hardcastle and Janet Ellis in September 1596, in Leeds. One Mathew Hardcastell recorded in a “Muster of the Inhabitants in Virginia” derived in 1624; he settled in the same year on the “Jacob.” A Coat Royal symbol gave to the Hardcastle family describes, on a black shield, three red tiger’s faces on a chevron in the mid of three castles, silver. At the peak is a lady clothe in blue, holding in the favorable hand the sun, and in the nasty the moon in order.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hardcasstle, Hardcastel, Hurdcastle, Hartcastle, Hardcostle, Heartcastle, Hayward-Castill.

England:

The origins of the surname Hardcastle was found in Yorkshire where people held a family seat from ancient times and their first documentations were found in the early poll rolls derived by the Kings of Britain to decide the rate of Taxation of their activities.

The very first recorded spellings of the family was shown to be that of Ann Hardcastle, dated about 1551, named at Pateley Bridge, Yorkshire. It was during the time of King Edward VI, who was known to be the “The Boy King,” dated 1547-1553. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Hardcastle had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Hardcastle who settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Hardcastle who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Mary Hardcastle and Mary Hardcastle; both arrived in Maryland in 1740. Samuel and Elizabeth Hardcastle, both came to Maryland in 1774

Some of the people with the surname Hardcastle who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Capt. Hardcastle, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851. William Hardcastle at the age of 50, landed in New York in 1862.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Hardcastle who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Mr. Joseph Hardcastle U.E. who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick near the year 1784.

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Hardcastle who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Margaret Hardcastle landed in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Pegasus” in 186.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hardcastle: United States 3,791; England 3,183; Australia 637; Ghana 479; South Africa 475; Canada 371; New Zealand 142; Wales 135; Scotland 92; Spain 53.

Notable People:

Bill Hardcastle (1874–1944), was a New Zealand player in rugby.

Diana Hardcastle was a famous British actress

Douglas Hardcastle (1886–1915), was an English football player.

Edgar Hardcastle (1900–1995), was a researcher of Marxist economics.

Edward Hardcastle (1826–1905), was a famous British trader and old leader.

Frank Hardcastle (1844–1908), was a British financial person and old leader.

Leslie Hardcastle is a manager of the British Film Institute.

Michael Hardcastle (1933- ), British author of children’s sports fiction

Paul Hardcastle was a famous writer.

Rick Hardcastle (1956- ), is a Texas leader.

Sarah Hardcastle (1969- ), is an English swimmer.

Sonya Hardcastle is a New Zealand basketball player.

Hardcastle Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hardcastle family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Notes: None. Blazon: Sa. on a chev. betw. three castles ar. as many leopards' faces gu. Crest—A lady attired az. holding in the dexter hand the sun, and in the sinister the moon ppr.
2) Notes: (Netherhall, co. Suffolk, and The Lodge, Holt, co. Norfolk). Motto—Deus mihi munimen. Blazon: Sa. on a chev. betw. three castles ar. as many leopards' faces gu. Crest—A castle ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Castle
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
15. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45