Harling Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Harling Family Coat of Arms

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Harling Coat of Arms Meaning

Harling Name Origin & History

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Harling Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Harling blazon are the unicorn, martlet and fleur-de-lis. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, argent and sable .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The unicorn is an intresting example that is still part of our own mythology today. The unicorn as illustrated on even the most ancient coat of arms is still instantly recognisable to us today, and shares many of the same poses that both lions and horses can be found in. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Unicorn. Wade, the 18th century heraldic writer suggested that were adopted as symbols because of “its virtue, courage and strength”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P85

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Harling Name

Harling Origin:

England

Origins of Harling:

This interesting surname is of English origin and acquirs from the Norman particular name “Herluin” or “Arluin.” The specific name is a combination of the Germanic components “erl,” which means fighter and “wine,” which means companion. So, the whole meanings of the name is “warrior friend.” The given name was first noted as “Herluinus” in the Domesday Book of 1086. The surname advancement since 1225 contains the following as Roger Herlewyn (1230 Dorset), Peter Harlewyne (1279, Cambridgeshire), William Herlyn (1327, Sussex), Agnes Herlyng (1379, Yorkshire) and Robert ,” (1524, Suffolk). The new surname can appear as Harlin(g), Arling, Hurlin(g), Hurlen, Urlin(g) and Urlwin. According to the recordings in London are the naming of Christopher, son of Edward and Alce Harling, in January 1629 at St. Andrew’s, Holborn, and the wedding of Edward Harling and Elizabeth Marchant in July 1635 at St. Gregory by St. Paul, Benjamin Harling married Rebecca Taylor in November 1709 in London.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hareling, Harleing, Harrling, Haerling, Hearling, Harlingue, Harliwong, Harlingga, Haierling, Hayerling.

England:

The surname Harling first appeared in Norfolk where they held a family seat from ancient times as Kings of the palace of Harling. Conjecturally, they declined from the residents of the hamlet of Harling which at the time of the taking of the Domesday Book in 1086 consisted of a village with a chapel, two mills, tanks, a colony, and 180 sheep. The village of Harling on the River Thet in the middle centuries later became two, East Harling and West Harling. The owners of the land in 1086 were Godric, Ingulf, and Robert de Verly.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of John Erlewin, dated about 1225, in the “Calender of the Patent Rolls”, Kent. It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Harling had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Harling landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Harling who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Cath Harling settled in Georgia in 1736. Wm. Harling settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1764. James Harling settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1774.

The following century saw more Harling surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Harling who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Frederick Harling, who arrived in Iroquois County, Illinois in 1867. Ferdinand Harling, who landed in St Clair County, Illinois in 1876.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Harling: England 1,549; United States 1,509; Germany 572; Sweden 370; South Africa 365; Australia 295; Canada 275; Indonesia 228; Scotland 66; Denmark 59.

Notable People:

Sir Robert Harling passed away in September in the year 1435. He was an early member of the landed gentry, officer, and political strongman. The Norfolk hamlets of East Harling, West Harling, Harling Market and Larling were greatly under his administration. He was a champion of the Shire, a Governor of the Estate and administrator of the house of Edward IV. He married Jane Gonville, whose father organized what was to become Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge.

Robert M. Harling III was born in November 1951. He is an American author, generator and film producer.

Robert Henry Harling (London March 1910–July 2008 Godstone, Surrey) was a British typographer, artist, commentator, and novelist who lived to the age of 98.

W. Franke Harling (January 1887 – November 1958) was an author of film scores.

Kaine Harling was born in March 1977. He is an award-winning Australian film producer and cameraman. His filmography contain Chopper, Ned Kelly, Big Mamma’s Boy, The Lookalike and Sugar Mountain.

Harling Family Gift Ideas

Browse Harling family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Notes: (co. Devon). Blazon: Az. semee-de-lis ar.
2) Notes: (co. Suffolk). Blazon: Az. nine fleurs-de-lis ar. three, three, two, and one.
3) Notes: (co. Suffolk). Blazon: Ar. a unicorn sejant sa. armed and unguled or.
4) Notes: (co. Suffolk). Blazon: Ar. a unicorn climant sa. armed and unguled or. Crest—A bombshell inflamed ppr.
5) Notes: None. Blazon: Az. a fesse dancettee betw. three martlets or.
6) Notes: None. Blazon: Ar. a saltire engr. az.
7) Notes: None. Blazon: Gu. a fesse vair, in chief a unicorn courant or, betw. two mullets of the last, a bordure engr. of the third.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Unicorn
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P85
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489