Harry Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Harry Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Harry Coat of Arms Meaning

Harry Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Harry. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

harry coat of arms

Harry Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Harry blazon are the sable, lozenge, annulet and cross engrailed. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, sable and azure .

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the lozenge Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. It can appear on its own, voided (with the background visible through the middle), and can also be conjoined, whereby adjacent lozenges touch point-to-point. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lozenge Guillim groups the lozenge with all square shapes as being symbolic of “verity, probity, constancy and equity”. 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P262

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the annulet is a good example, being a circular ring of any colour. They also appear interlaced or one within the other, both of which are very pleasing additions. Wade believes that these were one of the symbols of ancient pilgrims. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19

Harry Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Harry Name

Harry Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Harry:

The surname of Harry itself can be derived from the personal given name of Harry, which was often given as a nickname. It is a common element of surnames throughout Europe that many of them originally derived from nicknames, as it was a very common practice in medieval times. In the beginning, nicknames were applied to people who had distinguishing characteristics, such as moral or mental peculiarities, a similar appearance to a bird or animal, a similar disposition to a bird or animal, occupation of an individual, their habits, or their manner of dress. In the case of the surname of Harry, the nickname was derived from the Old French name of “Henri,” itself able to be translated to mean “home-rule.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Harrey, Harrhy, Harray, Haerry, Harroy, Hahrry, Harrya, Hearry, Harrye, Harr, Hary, Hawarry, Hurry

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Harry can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of one Nicholas Herri, who was mentioned in the document known as the Subsidy Rolls of the county of Buckinghamshire in the year of 1327. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Edward II of England, who was known throughout the ages and commonly referred to as one “Edward of Caernarfon.” King Edward II of England ruled from the year of 1307 to the year of 1327. Other mentions of the surname of Harry within the country of England include one William Herry, who served as a witness in the court rolls of the borough of Colchester in the year of 1337, while one William Harrys was recorded as living in the area of Eynsham, Oxfordshire in the year of 1406.

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, it became common for European citizens to migrate to the United States of America. These citizens were displeased with the state of the government from the country of their birth, often coming from tyrannical governments with poor living conditions in their cities. The United States of America, which at that time was commonly referred to as The New World, or The Colonies, offered more freedoms than those who were migrating from the European countries were used to. The United States of America promised the ability to own land, freedom from religious persecution, and the ability to help form a new government. This large movement of people to the United States of America is commonly referred to as the European Migration, or in some cases the Great Migration. Among those who migrate to the United States of America were those who bore the surname of Harry. One person by the name of Richard Harry, who was thirty-two years of age, arrived in the state of Virginia in the year of 1635, making him the first recorded person in the United States of America to bear the surname of Harry. James Harry arrived in Virginia in the year of 1651.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Harry: Nigeria 36,833; United States 11,161; Pakistan 4,023; Papua New Guinea 3,985; England 3,431; Bangladesh 3,094; South Africa 2,557; Ghana 2,077; Uganda 2,054; Vietnam 1,987; Malaysia 1,922; India 1,816

Notable People:

Deborah Ann “Debbie” Harry (born in 1945) who was born with the name of Angela Tremble, and who was a singer-songwriter and actress from America, and who is most notably recognized as the lead singer of the rock band Blondie.

Willis G. Harry, who served as the U.S. Vice Consul in Georgetown from the year of 1919 to the year of 1922, and who was a politician from America.

Walter Harry, who served as as Candidate in the primary for the Michigan State House of Representatives in the 54th District in the year of 1978, and who was a Republican politician from America.

Steve Harry, who served as a Candidate for the Oklahoma State Senate in the 40th District in the year of 2002, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

John B. Harry, who served as a Member of the North Carolina State Senate from Lincoln County in the year of 1835, and who was a politician from America.

Floyd Harry, who served as a Candidate for the U.S. Representative from Texas in the 4th District in the year of 1928, in the year of 1930, in the year 1932, and in the year of 1946, and who was a Republican politician from America.

Harry Family Gift Ideas

Browse Harry family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More harry Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Or, a chevron sable, between three ravens proper
2) (Poston, co. Hereford). (alias Henry). Ar. a fesse betw. three lozenges az. a bordure of the last. Crest—An angel’s head couped below the breast ppr., wings expanded, vested az.
3) Ap-Harry, or Parry Ar. a fesse betw. three lozenges a bordure az.
4) Fitz-Henry, or Fitz-Harry Ar. on a cross engr. sa. an annulet or.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lozenge
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P262
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19