Harty Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Harty Family Coat of Arms

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Harty Coat of Arms Meaning

Harty Name Origin & History

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Harty Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Harty blazon are the falcon, trefoil and fesse. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, or and vert .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. The falcon is a bird long associated with hunting and we need look no further than a liking for this pursuit for its presence on many early coats of arms. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Falcon We also find many of the accessories used in falconry depicted on arms, and a surprising number of terms from the art of falconry have found use in modern English idioms and the interested reader is recommended to search out the origins of the phrases hoodwinked and “cadging” a lift.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The trefoil may originally been a representation of a specific plant (perhaps shamrock) but it has been used as a symbol almost since the beginning of heraldry and over time has adopted a stylised aspect. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil. Guillim believes that it signifies “perpetuity…the just man shall never wither”. 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Harty Name

Harty Origin:

Ireland

Origin of Harty:

This name, with different spelling forms such as Harty and Hearty, has an Irish origin. It is an Anglicized form of the Gaelic word “O’hA(tha)rtaight,” which means ” offsprings of Faghartach,” with the addition of “O,” which means “grandson or male off springs of,” and “Faghartach,” a name for a person who has a thunderous voice. Frequently, Irish family names derived from the pioneers of clans, honorable elders, or from some noble conquerors, and generally add “O,” as above, or “Mac,” expressing “son of.” The previous formation of this name was O’Haherty, a phonetic Anglicization of O’hAthartaigh. The evolution of the component “h” is limited in the Gaelic pattern; this happens in this situation. O’hAthartaigh has shortened to O’Hartaigh or O’Harta, from which named as Harty. The name is found in the division of Munster, chiefly the Division of Tipperary and Cork. Two interesting name holders were Dr. John M. Harty (1867 – 1946), minister of Cashel, and Lt. Gen. Oliver Harty (1746 – 1823), who after thirty years in the Irish Brigade survived following the French Revolution and praised by Napoleon as Baron de Pierreburg. The family monogram is a gold shield, a black fess, in the mid of three green three foils, with three gold falcons, at the peak being between two gold wings, a falcon’s head removed and decorated on the neck with a green trefoil.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Hearty, Hartey, Harity, Hoarty, Haraty, Hartye, Hyarty, Hartay, Hartya, Harety.

Ireland:

The name Harty first originated in division Meath an old part of the Kingdom of Brega, in Eastern Ireland, in the division of Leinster, where they were of the southern Ui Neill. Before the Anglo – Norman invasion of the 12th century, their lords were recognized as the lords of Teffia.

England:

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of John Harty, dated in June 1674, was named at St. Giles’ Cripplegate, London. It was during the time of King Charles II, who was known to be the “The Merry Monarch,” dated 1660 – 1685. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Harty settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Harty who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Hans Jacobszen Harty, who landed in New Netherland in 1663. Hans Jakobsen Harty, who arrived in America in 1680.

Some of the people with the name Harty who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Joseph Harty at the age of 55, came to New York in 1812 – 1813. Lockline Harty at the age of 17, arrived in New York in 1849.

Some of the people with the name Harty who settled in the United States in the 20th century included Joseph Harty at the age of 52, came to New York, NY in 1919 aboard the ship “Chicago” from Bordeaux, France. Patrick Harty at the age of 31 from Bootle, England who settled in New York City, New York in 1919 aboard the ship “Celtic” from Liverpool, England.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Harty who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Maurice Harty, who settled in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1843.

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Harty who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Catherine Harty at the age of 28, landed in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Woodlark” in 1874.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Harty: United States 4,981; England 801; Ireland 1,092; Jamaica 286; Indonesia 140; Northern Ireland 119; Australia 540; Scotland 177; Canada 741; South Africa 1,388.

Notable People:

Herbert Hamilton Harty (1879–1941), was an Irish and British writer, supervisor and pianist.

Ian Harty (born 1978), was a Scottish football player

Rhett Harty (born 1970), is an American soccer player.

Russell Harty (1934–1988), was an English television artist.

William Harty (1847–1929), was an Ontario businessman and leader.

Harty Family Gift Ideas

Browse Harty family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Birchington, co. Kent). Or, on a fesse sa. three falcons volant of the field. Crest—A falcon’s head erased ppr. betw. two wings expanded or.
2) (Prospect House, Roebuck, co. Dublin, bart.; granted to Robert Wat Harty, Esq., Lord Mayor of Dublin, created a bart. 1831). Motto—Malo mori quam foedari. Or, on a fess sa. betw. three trefoils slipped vert as many falcons volant of the first. Crest—Betw. two wings erect or, each charged with a hurt, a falcon's head erased ppr. charged on the neck with a trefoil slipped vert.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Falcon
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse