Haughton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Haughton Family Coat of Arms

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Haughton Coat of Arms Meaning

Haughton Name Origin & History

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Haughton Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Haughton blazon are the bar, mullet, covered cup and owl. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and argent.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bar is a thin, horizontal stripe across the centre of the shield 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar, usually in groups of two or three (any more and there would be confusion with barry, a treatment of horizontal lines of alternating colours). Bars can be a distinctive and easily recognised device, early examples include those awarded by Henry III of England to the family MAUDYT Argent, two bars gules.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 8A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

Cups of all kinds have been popular charges on coats of arms since at least the 14th century. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cup In appearance and description they range from simple drinking pots (GERIARE of Lincoln – Argent three drinking pots sable) to covered cups, more like chalices in appearance. 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P288. These were borne by the BUTLER family in reference to their name and Wade suggests that their appearance may also refer to holy communinion within the church. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Haughton Name

Haughton Origin:

England, Scotland, Ireland

Origin of Haughton:

Listed as Haughan, sometimes as Haughin, Haughian, and Haughhan, and most commonly as Haughton. It is related to many countries and also a difficult surname. It can be English, Scottish or Irish and has appeared in all three countries and all formations. It is considered that Haughton was frequently English and geographical from different places named as Haughton in the division of Cheshire, Durham, Lancashire, Northumberland, Shropshire, and Staffordshire. If so, it acquires before the 7th-century word,” huau”, which means a corner or Dale, and ‘-tun,’ a village or settlement. Haughton in Nottinghamshire appears in the famous Domesday Book of 1086 as ‘Hoctun.’ The Haughan’s, Haughin’s, Haughian’s or Haughton’s in Ireland may be the ancestors of English settlers, or of Gaelic ancestry, and so that Irish or Scottish. If so the basic form was perhaps O’ hEachain or MacEachan, which means the male descendant (O’) or son (Mac) of Eachan, a holy person of the 8th century. Previous examples of documentations contain as Desmond Haughton, who was given sixteen hundred acres’ land in South Wexford in the year 1600, Richard Haughhan named at St. Giles Cripplegate, City of London, in November 1629. While Mary Haughin or Haughlin at the age of 15, given as being an unmarried woman, was a traveler on the ship Reliance of Liverpool. This ship departed from Liverpool bound for New York in May 1846.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Haughaton, Haughtono, Haughyton, Haughtone, Haughtonw, Hughton, Haghton, Houghton, Haighton, Haughten.

England:

The name Haughton first appeared in Cheshire at Haughton (or Haughton Moss), a hamlet and a local church. This Hamlet is by far the largest of the recordings of the place name in England.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Edward Haughhan who married Elizabeth Anthony, at St. Dunstan’s Stepney, in November 1574. It was during the time of Queen Elizabeth 1st, who was known to be the “Good Queen Bess”, 1558 – 1603. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Haughton settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Haughton who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Henry Haughton arrived in Salem, Massachusetts in 1629. Thomas and Robert Haughton settled in Virginia in the same year 1635. Gerard Haughton settled in Barbados in 1639. George Haughton settled in Maryland in 1660.

Some of the people with the name Haughton who settled in the United States in the 19th century included A. Haughton at the age of 21, who emigrated to the United States, in 1895.

Some of the people with the name Haughton who settled in the United States in the 20th century included Bridget Haughton at the age of 22 landed in America from Headford, Co. Kerry, Ireland, in 1906. Edmond Haughton, who settled in America, in 1906. Dora Haughton at the age of 29, who moved to the United States from Manchester, England, in 1908. Charles Haughton at the age of 20, who settled in America from Carrigallen, Ireland, in 1909. Annie Haughton at the age of 16, who landed in America from Ahaseragh, Ireland, in 1909.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Haughton who settled in the Australia in the 19th century included Mary A. Haughton at the age of 10, arrived in South Australia in 1853 aboard the ship “Magdalena.”

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Haughton who settled in the New Zealand in the 19th century included W. H. Haughton arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Asterope” in 1870. Joseph Haughton arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Lorraine” in 1879.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Haughton: Jamaica 4,176; United States 4,083; England 2,909; Canada 775; South Africa 511; Ireland 491; Honduras 444; Australia 375; Scotland 144; Panama 114.

Notable People:

Aaliyah (1979–2001), was an American musician and actress.

Billy Haughton (1923–1986), was an American tackle driver.

Colin Haughton (born 1972), is an English badminton singles player from Denton near Manchester.

Chris Haughton (born 1992), is a Canadian manager.

Chris Haughton was an Irish artist.

Greg Haughton (born 1973), is a Jamaican track sportsman.

Haughton Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Haughton, co. Chester). Sa. three bars ar. Crest—A bull’s head couped ar. charged on the neck with three bars sa.
2) (cos. Chester and Lancaster). Barry of six sa. and ar.
3) (Beckbury, co. Salop). Ar. a cross sa. in the first and last quarters an owl ppr.
4) Sa. three bars and a canton ar. Crest—A pelican's head and neck vulning itself ppr.
5) Ar. three bars sa. on a chief of the second two mullets of the first.
6) Ar. three bars gu. in chief three covered cups of the second.
7) Ar. a cross sa. in the chief dexter quarter an owl gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
8. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cup
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P288
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117