Hazlewood Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hazlewood Family Coat of Arms

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Hazlewood Coat of Arms Meaning

Hazlewood Name Origin & History

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Hazlewood Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hazlewood blazon are the squirrel, hazel branch and saltire. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and azure.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The squirrel is a quite delightful charge, always shown sitting upright (known as sejant) and eating a nut, 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Squirrel in a most lifelike manner (as this author can attest due to the presence of exactly such a creature outside his window as I write this). It should not surprise us that the significance of such a creature upon a coat of arms is a love of the “sylvan retirement” to be found in the woods and forest. 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69

Amongst the natural objects depicted on a coat of arms, trees feature frequently, either in whole or as individual branches and leaves. 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407. Sometimes the species or the part of tree was chosen as an allusion to the name of the bearer, as in Argent three tree stumps (also known as stocks) sable” for Blackstock 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P309 Trees of course had long been venerated and its use in a coat of arms may have represented some association with the god Thor 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P112

The saltire is one the major ordinaries, large charges that occupy the whole of the field 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire. Arguably one of the best uses of this device is that of the St. Andrews Cross, a white saltire on a blue background found on the Scottish flag. The saltire is obviously closely related to the Cross, and Wade in his work on Heraldic Symbology suggests additionally that it alludes to “Resolution”, whilst Guillim, an even more ancient writer, somewhat fancifully argues that it is awarded to those who have succesfully scaled the walls of towns! 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P63

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hazlewood Name

Hazlewood Origin:

England

Origins of Hazlewood:

It is an English locational surname. It starts from one or all the hamlets called Hazlewood found in the districts of Norfolk, Nottinghamshire, and especially in Yorkshire, where there are, or were in old times, townships in the churches of Skipton and Tadcaster. The old documentations are from Yorkshire, and it was considered that these are related to the estate and palace of Hazlewood, three miles west of Tadcaster. These first documentations dating from the real Census Tax returns of the year 1379 contain one Ricardus de Hesilwode and Robertus de Heselwode, which despite the little differing spellings were considered to be related and may have been father and son and likely kings of the estates of Hazlewood. Most surnames are ‘from’ names. That is to say, surnames were given to people as an easy association after they departed from their original homes and shifted to any other place. It may not be the case with this name, and it is possible that all name owners descended from the original land owners. The name means ‘the hazel wood’ from the Olde English pre 7th-century ‘haesel-woda.’ The name was the first recording in remaining London church records. An example being John Hasylwood, who married Katherine Weste, at the parish St Michael’s, Cornhill, in the year 1553.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hazzlewood, Heazlewood, Hazelewood, Hazlewowod, Haizlewood, Hazlewod, Hazlwood, Hazelwood, Hazalwood, Hazwlwood.

England:

The origins of the surname Hazlewood appeared in Salop where people held a family seat from old times. Some say better before the invasion of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Hazlewood had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Hazlewood landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Hazlewood who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included John Hazlewood, who landed in Virginia in 1654. Bryan Hazlewood, who landed in Virginia in 1662. William Hazlewood, who arrived in Virginia in 1663. George Hazlewood, who came to Virginia in 1683.

People with the surname Hazlewood who landed in the United States in the 19th century included Wm. J. Hazlewood, who settled in America, in 1895.

The following century saw more Hazlewood surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Hazlewood who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Alfred Hazlewood, who landed in America from Devonfort, in 1906. Alfred Hazlewood, who landed in America from Workington, Scotland, in 1907. Walter Hazlewood, who landed in America, in 1907. Lilian Mary Hazlewood, who landed in America from Tottenham, England, in 1907. Sydney Ed Hazlewood, who landed in America from Brixham, England, in 1909.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hazlewood: United States 2,259; England 1,032; Canada 354; Australia 256; New Zealand 161; France 98; Panama 82; Scotland 66; Wales 56; Guyana 49.

Notable People:

Robert Roy Hazelwood (born March 1938-died April 2016) was an old FBI profiler of sex crimes and considered as the leading expert of profiling sexual predators.

Barton Lee Hazlewood (July 1929–August 2007) was an American country and pop singer, composer, and record producer, most widely known for his work with guitarist Duane Eddy during the late 1950s and singer Nancy Sinatra in the 1960s.

Josh Reginald Hazlewood was born in January in the year 1991 in Tamworth, New South Wales. He is an Australian cricket player who plays for New South Wales and Australia.

Joseph Jeffrey Hazelwood (born September 24, 1946) is an American traveler. He was the commander of Exxon Valdez during its 1989 oil spill.

John Adam Hazelwood (October 1869 – January 1923) was an American advocate and leader.

Hazlewood Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hazlewood family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Belton, co. Rutland). Ar. on a saltire gu. betw. three owls sa. as many lozenges ar. each charged with an erm. spot, on a chief az. three branches of hazel or. Crest—A squirrel sejant az. bezantee, cracking a nut.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Squirrel
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P309
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P112
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P63