Headworth Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Headworth Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Headworth Coat of Arms Meaning

Headworth Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Headworth. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

headworth coat of arms

Headworth Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Headworth blazon are the cross moline, canton and bar. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and argent.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. The cross moline is typical of these whereby each arm of the cross expands and curves outwards, reminscent of the fer-de-moline from which it gets its name. These cross variations are probably largely for decorative effect, and to differentiate the arms from similar ones and hence their significance is that of the Christian cross itself.

“The canton stands very high among honourable bearings”, according to Wade, a noted symbologist 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48. The canton is a square shape, normally occupying the dexter chief of the shield. An early example is SUTTON, Bishop of Lincoln in the 13th century, who bore “argent a canton sable”. It occupies less space than a quarter and hence is sometimes added to an existing shield to difference branches of the same family, or, when a charge is added to it, to indicate some honour has been recieved 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Canton. Wade remarks, that, in common with all square features can be associated with the virtue of“constancy”.

The bar is a thin, horizontal stripe across the centre of the shield 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar, usually in groups of two or three (any more and there would be confusion with barry, a treatment of horizontal lines of alternating colours). Bars can be a distinctive and easily recognised device, early examples include those awarded by Henry III of England to the family MAUDYT Argent, two bars gules.

Headworth Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Headworth Name

Headworth Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Headworth comes from the village Headworth and derives from a locational near Jarrow in the county of Northumberland. This surname could also be granted to lords of the manor or their descendants, or when people arrived in the town in search of work. Normally people in medieval times would call people by their place of origin and even up until the 20th century if someone new arrived in town it was still commonplace. Normally a similar sounding name would also be used.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hedworth, Hadworth, Heidworth, Hetworth, Hatworth, Hedwierth, Hoodworth, Hidworthy, Hadrath, Hadrith

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Headworth was in 1086 in the Domesday Book, and was listed as Heapeworp not Headsworth. This name meant the area of worp was covered by heather. The original recordings of Northumberland did not have any recordings of the name spelled as Headworth.

Other early examples of the surname was Adryan Hedworthe of Newcastle upon Tyne listed in 1642. Robert Headworth at the St Dunstans church in East, Stephney London in 1709 was also recorded. The first modern recording of the name was for Bridget Hedworthe in 1575 under Queen Elizabeth the first at St Martins in the Field.

The Monkton township in Durham was also significant to the family name of Headworth. The neighboring town of Southwidk was at one time the property of a family, Suthwyk, and they would be usurped by the growing family posessions of the Hedworths.

United States

The Great Migration saw many English families move to the New World. As thousands left England, many left but did not arrive in the US, but those that did would make a significant contribution to their countries. Early immigration records show that Alexander Hedworth at the age of 42 arrived at Ellis Island in North America. Doris Hedworth at the young age of 9 arrived at Ellis Island also from Shielas England in the year 1916. They would both eventually settle in America to form a new life.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Headworth:

United States 83, England 59, Canada 12, Scotland 1, Australia 1, Russia 1

Notable People:

Chris Hedworth (1964) center half fielder for English football club. 10 year career played for various clubs in northern England.

Henry Hedworth (1626 – 1705) The first person to introduce the Latin term Unitarian to the English language. This was a notable accomplishment at the time. He was a student of John Biddle and friends with Thomas Firmin. Bill Hedworth (1900) a maker of Northumbrian smallpipes and for a period of time the only person making these pipes. He was a lifelong businessman and considered very important in maintaining the instruments even when demand had fallen considerably.

Ian Hedworth (1926) was the baron of Gilmour of craigmillar. He was a conservative politician in the United Kingdom and was styled Ian Gilmore from 1977 onward. He was secretary of state for defense in 1974.

Headworth Family Gift Ideas

Browse Headworth family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More headworth Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Ar. two bars gu. on a canton of the second a cross moline or.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Canton
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar