Henry Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Henry Family Coat of Arms

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Henry Coat of Arms Meaning

Henry Name Origin & History

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Henry Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Henry blazon are the lozenge, annulet and cross engrailed. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and sable.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the lozenge Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. It can appear on its own, voided (with the background visible through the middle), and can also be conjoined, whereby adjacent lozenges touch point-to-point. 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lozenge Guillim groups the lozenge with all square shapes as being symbolic of “verity, probity, constancy and equity”. 8A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P262

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the annulet is a good example, being a circular ring of any colour. They also appear interlaced or one within the other, both of which are very pleasing additions. Wade believes that these were one of the symbols of ancient pilgrims. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67. The pattern engrailed is a series of scalloped indentations with the points facing outwards – and should not be confused with invected, which has the points facing inwards! Wade believes that both of these indented forms represent “earth or land”, and one perhaps can indeed see the furrowed earth embodied in them.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Henry Name

Origin:

England, Ireland, France

Origins of Henry:

The surname of Henry is said to have roots within three different cultures, including the Irish, the French, and the English. It is said that the original derivation of the surname of Henry actually comes from the Old Germanic language, and stems from the word of “haimirich” which can be translated to mean “home ruler.” The old Germanic word of “haimirich” itself comes from the elements of “haim” which can be translated to mean “home” and the word “ric” which can be translated to mean “powerful.” It is said to be a patronymic surname, meaning “the son of Henry.” In the Irish culture, the surname of Henry derives from the Old Gaelic surname form of “O’ hInneirghe” which is said to be able to be translated to mean “one who is easily roused,” or “one who rises early.” The Irish surname of “O’ hInneirghe” was eventually evolved into the surname McEnery, which is from where the surname of Henry hailed in this country. Throughout the ages, the personal given name of Henry rose in popularity due to the eight kings who bore this name. Thus the surname of Henry is quite common because of the patronymic connotations of the surname.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hendry, Hendrie, Henson, Henery, Henrey, Henary, Hennry, Heenry, Heinry, Henrry, Henury, Henroy, Henri

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Henry was found in the country of England. One person who was born with the name of Willelmus Henryson was mentioned and named in the Poll Tax of Yorkshire in the year of 1379. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of King Richard II of England, who was commonly referred to throughout the ages as one “Richard of Bordeaux.” King Richard II of England ruled from the year 1377 until the year od 1399. Those who bear the surname of Henry can be found throughout the country of England. The areas with the larger concentrations of those people who bear the surname of Henry can be found in the counties of Yorkshire and Lancashire, as well as the areas in and around the city of London.

Wales:

Those who bear the surname of Henry can be found within the country of Wales. The area within the country of Wales that has the largest population of those who carry the surname of Henry can be found within the county of Glamorgan.

Scotland:

Within the country of Scotland, there are many people who bear the surname of Henry. The area that has the most people who are known by the surname of Henry is Lanarkshire County, which is closely followed by the county of Kirkcudbrightshire.

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th Century, it became common for European citizens to migrate to the United States of America. This movement of people was referred to as The European Migration. The first person to carry the surname of Henry in the United States was one Andrew Henry, who landed in the state of Virginia in the year 1651. Those who bear the surname of Henry can be found within the states of New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Henry: United States 182,339; Nigeria 81,308; France 43,583; Uganda 28,940; England 20,505; Tanzania 19,604; Jamaica 19,025; Canada 16,391; Haiti 10,932; South Africa 9,315

Notable People:

Gloria Henry (1923-1959) who was born with the name of Gloria McEniry, and who was an actress from America, who was most notably recognized for her portrayal of “Alice Mitchell” who was the mother on the popular CBS sitcom “Dennis the Menace” which ran from the year 1959 to the year 1963

William A. Henry III (1950-1994) who was an award-winning cultural critic from America, who was also an author who received the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism in the year 1980

Mike Henry (born in 1965) who is a writer, singer, producer, voice actor and comedian from America

Private Robert T Henry (1923-1944) who was a soldier from America who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in the year of 1944

Beulah Louise Henry (1887-1973) who was an inventor from America who was known by the nickname of “Lady Edison”

Benjamin Tyler Henry (1821-1898) who was an inventor from America, invented the Henry rifle

Augustine Henry (1857-1930) who was a botanist from Ireland, and who was the generator of names for many different kinds of plants, including but not limited to trees and shrubs

Henry Family Gift Ideas

Browse Henry family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Poston, co. Hereford). (alias Harry). Ar. a fesse betw. three lozenges az. a bordure of the last. Crest—An angel’s head couped below the breast ppr., wings expanded, vested az.
2) Fitz-Henry, or Fitz-Harry, or Harry Ar. on a cross engr. sa. an annulet or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lozenge
8. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P262
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67