Hibbert Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hibbert Family Coat of Arms

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Hibbert Coat of Arms Meaning

Hibbert Name Origin & History

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Hibbert Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hibbert blazon are the crescent, bend and barry. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and ermine .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

When the field of the shield is filled with alternately coloured horizontal lines, this is known as barry, obviously because it is like having many separate bars across the field 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Barry. Such shields have great clarity from a distance, those awarded by Henry III of England to Richard de Grey were, for example, Barry argent and azure, simple blue and white horizontal stripes. According to Wade, there was no specific meaning to be attached to barry itself, but it affords the opportunity to display at equal importance two colours that may themselves have specific meanings 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P55.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hibbert Name

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Portland Place, London). (Thomas Hibbest, Esq., of Birtles Hall, co. Chester). (Bucknell Manor, co. Oxford). (Chalfont Park, co. Bucks). (Braywick Lodge, co. Berks). Erm. on a bend sa. three crescents ar. Crest—An arm erect couped below the elbow, vested az. cuff erm. hand ppr. grasping a crescent ar.
2) Barry of eight and a pale counterchanged. Crest—A hand holding a millrind ppr.
3) (Holland-Hibbert, Munden House, Watford, co. Herts; exemplified to Arthur Henry Holland, Esq., second son of Sir Henry Thurstan Holland, Bart., upon his assuming, by royal licence, the additional surname of Hibbert). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, erm. on a bend nebuly sa. three crescents ar. in the sinister chief point a cross bottonee fitchee of the second, for Hibbert; 2nd and 3rd, per pale ar. and az. semee-de-lis a lion ramp. guard. counterchanged, debruised by a bendlet engr. gu. Crests—1st, Hibbert: In front of a dexter cubit arm erect ppr. vested az. cuff erm. holding in the hand a crescent ar. a demi catharine wheel also ar.; 2nd, Holland: Out of a crown vallery or, a demi lion guard, per bend ar. and az. charged with a bendlet engr. counterchanged and holding in the dexter paw a fleur-de-lis ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Barry
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P55