Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Tunbridge Wells, co. Kent). Azure a chevron engrailed between three salmons argent on a chief gules as many storks of the second ducally crowned or. Crest—A demi stork, wings expanded, ducally crowned or, holding in the beak a salmon argent.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Hibbs Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Hibbs Origin:

England

Origins of Hibbs:

The surname of Hibbs is said to be a patronymic surname that comes from the country of England. Since the surname of Hibbs is a patronymic name, meaning that the original bearer of the surname of Hibbs was the son, grandson, or direct male descendant of a person who was well-known and notable within the community from which the name derived. Patronymic names often added the suffix of “-son” to the end of the male ancestor’s name, which was later shortened to the addition of an “-s.” In the country of Ireland, patronymic surnames often began with “O” or “Mac” to denote the meaning of “son of.” In the country of France, an “L” was added to the beginning of the male descendant’s name to denote “son of.” In the case of the surname of Hibbs, the surname itself is a shortened form of the personal given name of Hibbard, which itself is a metronymic form of the personal given name of medieval times, coming from the name of “Ibb,” which comes from the personal given name of Isabella.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hibbes, Hibbis, Haibbs, Heibbs, Hibs, Hiabbas, Hobbs, Hebbs, Habbs, Hibsy, Hibes, Hibsi, Hybbs

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Hibbs can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Hibbs held a family seat in the county of Yorkshire, well before the Norman Conquest of the year of 1066. Those who are known to bear the surname of Hibbs within the country of England can be found in the areas of North Yorkshire, Devonshire, Dorset, and Staffordshire counties in high populations and concentrations.

Scotland:

Within the country of Scotland, there is a high concentration of those who bear the surname of Hibbs. The areas that have the highest concentration of those who bear the surname of Hibbs can be found within the counties of Dumfriesshire, Lanarkshire, and the areas within Midlothian.

United States of America:

Within the United States of America, there is a large population of people who are known to bear the surname of Hibbs. This population of people who bear the surname of Hibbs within the United States of America is so high because of the many European citizens, who migrated to the United States, which was then known as the New World, or the Colonies, within the European Migration, which occurred in the 17th and 18th centuries. Among those who migrated to the United States was one John Hibbs, who arrived in the state of Virginia in the year of 1672, sent as a servant to the plantations. Within the United States, those who are known to bear the surname of Hibbs can be found in the states of Pennsylvania, Illinois, and Kentucky.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hibbs: United States 6,758; England 1,334; Canada 943; Australia 314; New Zealand 293; Germany 168; Wales 158; Jordan 123; France 98; Scotland 53; Jersey 50; United Arab Emirates 31

Notable People:

Major-General Louis Emerson Hibbs (1893-1970) who served as the Commandant of the Field Artillery School from the year of 1945 to the year of 1946, and who was from America.

Ben Hibbs (1901-1975) who was a long-time editor of The Saturday Evening Post and who later worked as an editor at Reader’s Digest, and who was from America.

Jeffrey T. Hiibs, who served as a Candidate for the Texas State House of Representatives in the 57th District in the year of 2002 and again in the year of 2004, and who was a Republican politician from America.

Edward F. Hibbs, who served as the Postmaster at Barry, Maryland from the year of 1863 to the year of 1865, and who was a Republican politician from America.

D. P. R. Hibbs, who served as a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of Minnesota in the year of 1888, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Charles E. Hibbs, who served as an Alternate Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of Illinois in the year of 1924, and again in the year of 1932, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Hibbs Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Hibbs blazon are the stork and salmon. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, gules and argent .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”3. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 4. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.5.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 6. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 7.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 8. In truth, despite the proliferation of species, the actual depictions can sometimes be hard to distinguish! The crane, heron and stork are commonly to be found on a coat of arms but all tend to share the same stylised appearance 9. Guillim reckons the stork to the “emblem of filial duty” and also the “symbol of a grateful man”. 10

Fish in great variety abound in Heraldry, many different species inhabit coats of arms 11, although truth be told many of the actual images are sometimes indistinguishable, being shown as a stylised, and easily recognised salmon shape 12 that a child might draw. The actual name used in the coat of arms may be some play-on-words or allusion to the family name, as in the famous arms of the de Lucy family, being “Gules, three lucies or”, 13 this being an ancient name for the fish we call today a “pike”. It is possible that the salmon has been used in this fashion, or it may simply relate to some fishing activity in the history of the family.

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References

  • 1 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
  • 2 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 3 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 4 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 5 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
  • 6 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 7 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
  • 8 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
  • 9 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164
  • 10 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78
  • 11 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P150
  • 12 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P137
  • 13 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 79