Hill Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hill Family Coat of Arms

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Hill Coat of Arms Meaning

Hill Name Origin & History

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Hill Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Hill blazon are the garb, tower, escallop and cat passant. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and gules .

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.6The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Europe in the middle ages was still a largely agrarian society, and the wealth of the nobility resided in their estates and land. Since most people still lived and worked on the land they would find farm implements instantly recognisable, (an important feature for a coat of arms), even if they seem obscure to us today. 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86 The garb for example is an ancient word for wheatsheaf, something now more frequently seen in Inn signs than in the field! 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe

Architectural items, from individual components to entire buildings 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92 feature frequently as charges In a coat of arms. Not surprisingly, considering the times from which many arms date, fortifications are common. The tower Is a typical example of an object from the world of architecture adopted, albeit in a stylised form, for use in heraldry. It can be placed alone, or frequently with three turrets on the top, known as a tower triple towered, and can have doors and windows of a different colour. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Tower In continental European heraldry they are often accompanied by pictorial effects such as armoured knights scaling them on ladders.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hill Name

Hill Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Hill is of an Old English, Pre 7th Century origin. One of the possible origins for this surname is that it is a topographical surname. It is important to note that topographical surnames are ones that have been given to people who live on, in, or near a man made or natural feature that is widely visible in an area. The point of the topographical surname is that all people in that town or area know from where this person hails because of this topographical surname. In the case of the surname of Hill, the topographical connotation is that the original bearers of this surname were given it because of their location on or around a hill. This surname comes from the Old English word “hyll” which can be translated to mean “hill.” Another possible derivation of this surname comes from the given baptismal name of “Hille,” which is said to be a nickname in the time. This name itself comes from the Old English “hild” which can be translated to mean “battle,” or “war.” This nickname would have been a direct nickname from the English names of “Hildebrand” or “Hilliard,” and the French “hilaire,” or the Latin “hilaris,” which can be translated to mean “cheerful.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Haill, Hils, Hilly, Hille, Heill, Hoill, Hillu, Hilli, Hiell, Huill

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Hill can be found in the country of England. One person, who was named as Gilbert del Hil, was mentioned in the Pipe Rolls of Norfolk, in the year of 1191. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Richard I, who was commonly referred to throughout the ages as “The Lionheart.” King Richard I ruled from the year 1189 to the year 1199. Other mentions of the surname of Hill found in England include one William Attehil from Cambridge, who was mentioned in the Subsidy Rolls of Cambridgeshire in the year 1260, and one Thomas del Hill who was recorded in the Poll Tax Rolls of Yorkshire in the year 1379. It is important to note that at this time, topographical surnames often included the preposition “ate” or “del” as the examples previously mentioned. Those who carry the surname of Hill in the country of England can be found in large concentrations in the areas in and around London. This surname of Hill is also commonly found in the counties of Staffordshire, Yorkshire, and Lancashire.

Scotland:

In the country of Scotland, there is a small population of those who carry the surname of Hill. The area that has the largest concentration of Scottish citizens who bears this surname of Hill can be found within Lanarkshire county.

United States of America:

Throughout the 1600’s, it was common for European citizens to migrate to the United States of America. The living conditions in their home country were less than ideal, and thus they came to The New World seeking a new and improved life. The first person to bear the surname of Hill in the United States of America was one Edward Hill, who landed and settled in the state of Virginia in the year 1623. Those who carry the surname of Hill can be found in Texas, Maine, Vermont, California, and in New Hampshire.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hill: United States 458,284; England 76,963; Australia 37,424; Canada 30,306; South Africa 19,615; Scotland 6,163; New Zealand 5,806; Wales 5,531; Nigeria 4,738; Mexico 3,769

Notable People:

Winston Hill (1941-2016) who was a football player in both college and professionally from America, and was an AFL All-Star four separate times, in the years 1964, 1967, 1968 and in 1969

Gilbert Rowland “Gil” Hill (1931-2016) who was a politician and actor from America, and served as the President of the Detroit City Council, and is most notably recognized for his role as Inspector Todd in the Beverly Hills Cop movies

Cleo Hill (1938-2015) who was a former professional basketball player from America

Raymond Millous “Ray” Hill (1975-2015) who was who was a football player in both college and professionally from America

Lauren Hill (1995-2015) who was a freshman basketball player at Mount St. Joseph who suffered from terminal brain cancer, and was a runner-up for the Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year, and who died at the age of 19 due to her illness

Mr. Charles Tilden Hill, who was a First Class Passenger from London, England, who was aboard the RMS Lusitania at the time of the sinking, and escaped the vessel via life boat number 14

E. C. Hill (died in 1979) who was a passenger from Los, Angeles, California who perished in the American Airlines Flight 191 crash in 1979

Hill Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hill family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Olneston, co. Gloucester). Az. on a chev. betw. three owls ar. as many mullets sa. a bordure engr. erm.
2) (Marquess of Downshire). Mottoes—Per Deum et ferrum obtinui; and, Ne Tentes aut Perfice. Quarterly, 1st, same Arms, for Hill; 2nd, per bend sinister erm. and ermines a lion ramp. or, for Trevor; 3rd, gu. a cinquefoil or, for Rowe; 4th, ar. a chev. az. betw. three trefoils slipped per pale gu. and vert, also for Rowe. Crest—A reindeer’s head couped gu. attired and plain collared or. Supporters—Dexter, a leopard or, spotted sa. ducally gorged and chained gu.; sinister, a reindeer gu. attired, unguled, and plain collared or.
3) (Buntingdale and Court of Hill, co. Salop; the daus. and co-heirs of the last Thomas Hill, Esq., of Court of Hill, were Lucy, m. first, in 1780, to Thomas Humphrey Lowe, Esq., of Bromsgrove, and secondly, in 1803, to Thomas Fowler, Esq., of Abbey Cwnhir, co. Radnor; and Anna Maria m. in 1787, to Theophilus Richard Salwey, Esq., of the Lodge, co. Salop). Erm. on a fess sa. a tower triple-towered ar.
4) (Viscount Hill). Motto—Avancez. Same Arms. Crest—A tower ar. surmounted with a garland of laurel ppr. Supporters—Dexter, a lion ar. murally crowned or, gorged with a wreath of oak fructed ppr.; sinister, a horse ar. bridled and saddled ppr. murally gorged gu.
5) (Noel-Hill, Baron Berwick). Motto—Qui uti scit, ei bona. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Same Arms, on a canton gu. a martlet or, for Hill; 2nd, or, fretty gu. a canton erm., for Noel; 3rd, or, a chev. betw. three stags' heads cabossed gu., for Harwood. Crests— 1st, Hill: A stag statant ar.; 2nd, Noel: On the battlements of a tower ppr. a hind statant ar. collared and chained or; 3rd, Harwood: A stag's head cabossed sa. in the mouth a sprig of oak ppr. Supporters—Dexter, a pegasus ar. gorged with a plain collar sa. thereon a martlet or ; sinister, a stag ar. attired or, gorged with a plain collar sa. thereon a leopard's face gold, and a chain reflexed over the back also gold.
6) (co. Bedford). (co. Berks). Sa. on a fesse betw. three cats pass. or, as many crosses moline of the field.
7) (co. Berks). Sa. on a fesse ar. betw. three ounces pass. guard. or, as many escallops gu.
8) (co. Berks.) Sa. on a fesse ar. betw. three cats pass. guard. or, a cross moline betw. two escallops gu. Crest—A goat’s head per pale indented gu. and az. collared and armed or.
9) (Heligan, co. Cornwall, Visit. 1620; Hill’s Court, co. Devon, cos. Hants, Lincoln, and Somerset; the Hills, of Heligan, descended from Sir John Hill, of Kenston, co. Somerset). Gu. a saltire vair betw. four mullets ar. Crest—A demi leopard ar. spotted of all colours, ducally gorged or.
10) (Oliver Hill, of Shilston, co. Devon, and Richard Hill, of Truro, co. Cornwall, sons of Robert Hill, of the former. Visit. Cornwall, 1620). Ar. a chev. betw. three water bougets sa. Crest—A dove ar. in the beak an olive branch vert.
11) (Hillstope, co. Cornwall; William Hill, descended from Robert Hill, of Hill Top, who came into England with the Conqueror. Visit. 1620.) Gu. a chev. erm. betw. three garbs or.
12) (Sir Robert Hill, one of the Judges of the Common Pleas, temp. Henry VI.). Ar. a chev. betw. three water bougets sa. Crest—A. dove ar. in the beak an olive branch vert.
13) (Ashborne, co. Derby; granted 1615). Per chev. ar.and sa. three cinquefoils counterchanged.
14) (Richard Hill, Serjeant to the Cellar to Henry VIII. Visit. Hants, 1634). Gu. a saltire vair betw. four mullets ar.
15) (co. Gloucester). Sa. on a chev. betw. three owls ar. as many mullets pierced gu. a bordure engr. erm.
16) (granted to Capt. Henry Hill, of Knutsford, co. Chester). Motto—Auxilio divino. Az. a chev. paly of six ar. and sa. betw. two horses’ heads erased in chief of the second and in base as many swords in saltire ppr. pommels and hilts or. Crest—Betw. two branches of palm ppr. a boar’s head couped or, in the mouth a trefoil vert.
17) (co. Worcester; granted to William Hill, Esq., F.R.A.S., of Worcester, descended from Humphrey Hill, Esq., of Little Witley, co. Worcester, living 1712. William Hill’s son, by Elizabeth, his wife, dau. of Thomas Rowley, Esq. of Stourport, is Thomas Rowley Hill, Esq., of St. Katherine’s Hill, co. Worcester, M.P., High Sheriff of that county, 1870). Motto—Avancez. Erm. a chev. chequy or and az. in base on a mount vert a Cornish chough ppr. Crest—On a mount in front of a fernbrake ppr. a talbot or, collared az. resting the dexter foot on three annulets interlaced gold.
18) (Hill’s End, co. Hertford, London and Finchley, co. Middlesex). Per chev. embattled ar. and sa. three cinquefoils counterchanged. Crest—On a mount a branch vert, with three cinquefoils ar.
19) (Lewisham, co. Kent). Vert three talbots pass. ar. Crest—A stag’s head erased ppr. holding in the mouth an acorn branch vert, fructed or.
20) (co. Kent). Az. a chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis ar.
21) (co. Kent, and London). Sa. a chev. betw. three lions pass. guard. erm.
22) (Wye, co. Kent). Sa. on a fesse betw. three leopards pass. ar. as many escallops gu. Crest—A stag’s head erased ppr.
23) (co. Lincoln). Per chev. ar. and sa. three cinquefoils counterchanged.
24) (Lord Mayor of London, 1484). Sa. a chev. erm. betw. three lions pass. guard. ar.
25) Gu. three barrulets erm. in chief a lion pass. guard. or. Crest—A fleur-de-lis az.
26) (Sir Rowland Hill, Lord Mayor of London, 1549, a descendant of Humphrey Hill, of Court of Hill; his niece and co-heiress, Alice Barker, m. Sir Thomas Leigh). Gu. two bars or, on a canton sa. a chev. ar. betw. three pheons of the fourth, charged with a wolf's head erased betw. two mullets gu.
27) (London, 1616). Sa. a chev. erm. betw. three talbots’ heads erased ar. Crest—A talbot’s head erased ar. betw. two laurel branches vert.
28) (London). Ar. an eagle displ. with two heads sa. on a chief of the second three, roses of the first.
29) (London). Az. two bars or, a canton sa.
30) (London). Az. two bars ar. on a canton sa. a chev. betw. three pheons of the second.
31) (London; quartered by Austrey, co. Hunts). Per chev. embattled three cinquefoils counterchanged.
32) (John Hill, gentleman, of London, whose ancestors were of the North. Visit. London, 1568). Sa. a fess erm. betw. two cats-a-mountain pass. guard. ar.
33) (London). Ar. on a chief sa. three roses of the first.
34) (Tuddington, co. Middlesex). Sa. a chev. erm. betw. three leopards’ faces ar. Crest—A talbot’s head couped sa. guttee d'eau, gorged with a collar gu. rimmed and studded or.
35) (co. Middlesex, and Bromsgrove, co. Worcester). Erm. a chev. chequy or and sa. Crest—A talbot pass. or, collared gu.
36) (Hales, co. Norfolk). Gu. two bars erm. in chief a lion pass. per pale or and ar. Crest—A boar’s head and neck sa. in the mouth a broken spear ppr. headed ar.
37) (Yarmouth and Lynn, co. Norfolk). Gu. two bars erm. in chief a lion pass. or. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a demi lion pass. or, betw. two dragons’ wings expanded of the first, each charged with as many bars of the second.
38) (Silvington, co. Salop). Or, on a chief vert three bulls’ heads couped of the first. Crest—On the horns of a crescent vaire or and az. a bull’s head erased gold.
39) (Parva-Drayton, co. Salop). Az. an eagle displ. ar. over all a bend gu.
40) (Bridgwater, co. Somerset). Gu. a chev. engr. betw. three garbs ar.
41) (Taunton, co. Somerset). (Denham Place, co. Bucks). Gu. a chev. erm. betw. three garbs or. Crest—A dove with wings expanded, in the beak an olive branch all ppr.
42) (Pounsford, co. Somerset). Gu. a chev. betw. three garbs or, a bordure ar. Crest—An eagle, wings expanded ppr. in the beak an acorn slipped vert, fructed or.
43) (Taunton, co. Somerset). Gu. a chev. vair betw. three garbs or.
44) Az. three dolphins embowed or, on a chief of the last as many hurts. Crest—A squirrel sejant ar. collared and lined or.
45) (Littlepipe, co. Stafford; granted 1560). (alias Hull). Az. a chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis or, a canton of the last. Crest—A lion ramp. ar. pierced through the breast with a broken spear in bend ppr. the head guttee de sang.
46) (Bury St. Edmunds, co. Suffolk). Gu. two bars erm. in chief a lion pass. or. Crest—A boar’s head couped sa. in the mouth an acorn or, leaved vert, another acorn as the last stuck upon the head.
47) Sa. on a fesse ar. betw. three cats pass. guard. or, a cross moline betw. two cocks gu. Crest—A buck’s head per pale gu. and az. the nose or, collared of the last.
48) Az. two bars ar. on a quarter sa. a chev. betw. three pheons of the second, charged with a wolf's head erased betw. two mullets gu. Crest—A wolf's head erased az. thereon two bars ar. in the mouth a trefoil slipped vert.
49) Erm. a chev. componee ar. and gu. Crest—A talbot pass. ppr. collared gu.
50) Ar. a fesse betw. six martlets gu.
51) Gu. on a chev. engr. erm. betw. three garbs ar. a cinquefoil of the first.
52) Erm. a chev. lozengy gu. and or.
53) Az. a chev. ar. betw. three goats’ heads erased of the second, armed or.
54) Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three lozenges sa.
55) (Dennis Park, co. Stafford, and Blaenavon, co. Monmouth). Motto—Esse quam videri. Gu. two bars erm. in chief a lion pass. per pale or and ar. Crest—A fleur-de-lis ar.
56) (Alveston, co. Gloucester). Az. on a chev. betw. three owls ar. three mullets sa. a bordure erm.
57) (co. York). Sa. a chev engr. erm. betw. three leopards' faces ar. Crest—A talbot's head and neck couped sa. eared and semee of cinquefoils ar. gorged with a collar gu. edged, ringed, and studded or.
58) (Dilton). Sa. on a chev. engr. erm. betw. in chief two garbs or, and in base on a mount vert a garb, also or, betw. two reaping hooks erect ppr. three palets gu. each charged with an erm. spot of the third. Crest—Upon a mount vert betw. two ears of wheat or, a tower triple-towered ppr. charged with a passion cross or.
59) (Castle-Morton, co. Worcester, Oakhill, co. Hereford, Pepper Hill, co. Salop, and Stallington Hall, co. Stafford; Sarah, only child and heiress of Richard Clarke Hill, Esq., of Stallington Hall, m. 28 Jan. 1835, Sir Smith Child, Bart., of Newfield, co. Stafford, M.P.). Sa. a chev. or, betw. three wild cats pass. guard. ppr. Crest—A hawk ppr. belled or.
60) (Honiley, co. Warwick). Vert six talbots pass. ar.
61) (granted to Edward Smith Hill, Esq.). Motto—Par negotiis neque supra. Gu. a saltire betw. two martlets in pale and as many garbs in fesse or. Crest—A demi leopard ppr. gorged with a collar gemel or, holding betw. the paws a star of eight points or.
62) (John David Hay Hill, Esq., J.P., Gressenhall Hall, co. Norfolk). Gu. two bars erm. in chief a lion pass. or. Crest—A boar’s head erased ppr. holding in the mouth a trefoil vert. Motto—Spe labor levis.
63) (Henry Edward Hill, Esq., Oxford). Vert three talbots pass. ar. Crest—A buck’s head erased, in the mouth an oak sprig ppr.
64) (Very Rev. John Hill, Dean of Kilmore; Fun. Ent. of his wife, Ulster’s Office, 1634). Vert on a chev. betw. three talbots pass. ar. armed and langued gu. a mullet of the last.
65) (Hacketstown, co. Carlow; granted by Roberts, Ulster, 1648, to Arthur Hill, formerly of Winter's Park, Oxenhall, co. Gloucester, and descended from Hill, of Hillhouse, in same co.). Sa. on a chev. invected betw. three bears' heads erased ar. as many pellets. Crest—A greyhound sejant ar. collared az.
66) (Brooke Hall, co. Londonderry, bart.). Motto—Ne tentes aut perfice. Sa. a chev. erminois betw. three leopards’ faces ar. Crest—A talbot’s head couped sa. guttee d'eau, collared gu. studded and ringed or.
67) (St. John's, co. Wexford). Motto—Candide me fides. Ar. two bars ermines, in chief a lion pass. gu. Crest—A demi lion gu.
68) (Graig, Doneraile, co. Cork; settled there for upwards of two centuries, having been previously of Kilmallock, co. Limerick; granted 1560). Motto—Ne tenta, vel perfice. Az. a chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis or, a canton of the last. Crest—A lion ramp. ar. pierced through the breast by a broken spear in bend ppr. the head guttee de sang.
69) (Lambhill, Scotland, 1676). Motto—Veritas superabit montes. (Lambhill, Scotland, 1676). Az. a mount or, with the sun arising and appearing over the top in his splendour ppr. Crest—A Bible expanded ppr.
70) (Merrylee, co. Renfrew, 1865). (Merrylee, co. Renfrew, 1865). Same Arms, within a bordure erm. Same Crest and Motto.
71) (James Matthew Hill, Edinburgh and Bengal, 1858). Motto—Esse quam videri. Az. a mount ar. with the sun arising and appearing over the top in his splendour ppr. on a chief or, a wolf's head erased of the first betw. two eastern crowns gu. Crest—A dexter arm in armour embowed, the hand grasping a dagger all ppr.
72) (Joseph Hill, London, 1858). As the last, within a bordure gu. Same Crest and Motto.
73) (Hillsborough, co. Down; Fun. Ent. of Sir Moses or Moyses Hill, Knt., who accompanied the Earl of Essex to Ireland, 1573, ancestor of the Marquess of Downshire, d. Feb. 1629). Sa. on a fess betw. three leopards pass. guard. or, spotted of the field, as many escallops gu.
1) (Olneston, co. Gloucester). Az. on a chev. betw. three owls ar. as many mullets sa. a bordure engr. erm.
2) (Marquess of Downshire). Mottoes—Per Deum et ferrum obtinui; and, Ne Tentes aut Perfice. Quarterly, 1st, same Arms, for Hill; 2nd, per bend sinister erm. and ermines a lion ramp. or, for Trevor; 3rd, gu. a cinquefoil or, for Rowe; 4th, ar. a chev. az. betw. three trefoils slipped per pale gu. and vert, also for Rowe. Crest—A reindeer’s head couped gu. attired and plain collared or. Supporters—Dexter, a leopard or, spotted sa. ducally gorged and chained gu.; sinister, a reindeer gu. attired, unguled, and plain collared or.
3) (Buntingdale and Court of Hill, co. Salop; the daus. and co-heirs of the last Thomas Hill, Esq., of Court of Hill, were Lucy, m. first, in 1780, to Thomas Humphrey Lowe, Esq., of Bromsgrove, and secondly, in 1803, to Thomas Fowler, Esq., of Abbey Cwnhir, co. Radnor; and Anna Maria m. in 1787, to Theophilus Richard Salwey, Esq., of the Lodge, co. Salop). Erm. on a fess sa. a tower triple-towered ar.
4) (Viscount Hill). Motto—Avancez. Same Arms. Crest—A tower ar. surmounted with a garland of laurel ppr. Supporters—Dexter, a lion ar. murally crowned or, gorged with a wreath of oak fructed ppr.; sinister, a horse ar. bridled and saddled ppr. murally gorged gu.
5) (Noel-Hill, Baron Berwick). Motto—Qui uti scit, ei bona. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Same Arms, on a canton gu. a martlet or, for Hill; 2nd, or, fretty gu. a canton erm., for Noel; 3rd, or, a chev. betw. three stags' heads cabossed gu., for Harwood. Crests— 1st, Hill: A stag statant ar.; 2nd, Noel: On the battlements of a tower ppr. a hind statant ar. collared and chained or; 3rd, Harwood: A stag's head cabossed sa. in the mouth a sprig of oak ppr. Supporters—Dexter, a pegasus ar. gorged with a plain collar sa. thereon a martlet or ; sinister, a stag ar. attired or, gorged with a plain collar sa. thereon a leopard's face gold, and a chain reflexed over the back also gold.
6) (co. Bedford). (co. Berks). Sa. on a fesse betw. three cats pass. or, as many crosses moline of the field.
7) (co. Berks). Sa. on a fesse ar. betw. three ounces pass. guard. or, as many escallops gu.
8) (co. Berks.) Sa. on a fesse ar. betw. three cats pass. guard. or, a cross moline betw. two escallops gu. Crest—A goat’s head per pale indented gu. and az. collared and armed or.
9) (Heligan, co. Cornwall, Visit. 1620; Hill’s Court, co. Devon, cos. Hants, Lincoln, and Somerset; the Hills, of Heligan, descended from Sir John Hill, of Kenston, co. Somerset). Gu. a saltire vair betw. four mullets ar. Crest—A demi leopard ar. spotted of all colours, ducally gorged or.
10) (Oliver Hill, of Shilston, co. Devon, and Richard Hill, of Truro, co. Cornwall, sons of Robert Hill, of the former. Visit. Cornwall, 1620). Ar. a chev. betw. three water bougets sa. Crest—A dove ar. in the beak an olive branch vert.
11) (Hillstope, co. Cornwall; William Hill, descended from Robert Hill, of Hill Top, who came into England with the Conqueror. Visit. 1620.) Gu. a chev. erm. betw. three garbs or.
12) (Sir Robert Hill, one of the Judges of the Common Pleas, temp. Henry VI.). Ar. a chev. betw. three water bougets sa. Crest—A. dove ar. in the beak an olive branch vert.
13) (Ashborne, co. Derby; granted 1615). Per chev. ar.and sa. three cinquefoils counterchanged.
14) (Richard Hill, Serjeant to the Cellar to Henry VIII. Visit. Hants, 1634). Gu. a saltire vair betw. four mullets ar.
15) (co. Gloucester). Sa. on a chev. betw. three owls ar. as many mullets pierced gu. a bordure engr. erm.
16) (granted to Capt. Henry Hill, of Knutsford, co. Chester). Motto—Auxilio divino. Az. a chev. paly of six ar. and sa. betw. two horses’ heads erased in chief of the second and in base as many swords in saltire ppr. pommels and hilts or. Crest—Betw. two branches of palm ppr. a boar’s head couped or, in the mouth a trefoil vert.
17) (co. Worcester; granted to William Hill, Esq., F.R.A.S., of Worcester, descended from Humphrey Hill, Esq., of Little Witley, co. Worcester, living 1712. William Hill’s son, by Elizabeth, his wife, dau. of Thomas Rowley, Esq. of Stourport, is Thomas Rowley Hill, Esq., of St. Katherine’s Hill, co. Worcester, M.P., High Sheriff of that county, 1870). Motto—Avancez. Erm. a chev. chequy or and az. in base on a mount vert a Cornish chough ppr. Crest—On a mount in front of a fernbrake ppr. a talbot or, collared az. resting the dexter foot on three annulets interlaced gold.
18) (Hill’s End, co. Hertford, London and Finchley, co. Middlesex). Per chev. embattled ar. and sa. three cinquefoils counterchanged. Crest—On a mount a branch vert, with three cinquefoils ar.
19) (Lewisham, co. Kent). Vert three talbots pass. ar. Crest—A stag’s head erased ppr. holding in the mouth an acorn branch vert, fructed or.
20) (co. Kent). Az. a chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis ar.
21) (co. Kent, and London). Sa. a chev. betw. three lions pass. guard. erm.
22) (Wye, co. Kent). Sa. on a fesse betw. three leopards pass. ar. as many escallops gu. Crest—A stag’s head erased ppr.
23) (co. Lincoln). Per chev. ar. and sa. three cinquefoils counterchanged.
24) (Lord Mayor of London, 1484). Sa. a chev. erm. betw. three lions pass. guard. ar.
25) Gu. three barrulets erm. in chief a lion pass. guard. or. Crest—A fleur-de-lis az.
26) (Sir Rowland Hill, Lord Mayor of London, 1549, a descendant of Humphrey Hill, of Court of Hill; his niece and co-heiress, Alice Barker, m. Sir Thomas Leigh). Gu. two bars or, on a canton sa. a chev. ar. betw. three pheons of the fourth, charged with a wolf's head erased betw. two mullets gu.
27) (London, 1616). Sa. a chev. erm. betw. three talbots’ heads erased ar. Crest—A talbot’s head erased ar. betw. two laurel branches vert.
28) (London). Ar. an eagle displ. with two heads sa. on a chief of the second three, roses of the first.
29) (London). Az. two bars or, a canton sa.
30) (London). Az. two bars ar. on a canton sa. a chev. betw. three pheons of the second.
31) (London; quartered by Austrey, co. Hunts). Per chev. embattled three cinquefoils counterchanged.
32) (John Hill, gentleman, of London, whose ancestors were of the North. Visit. London, 1568). Sa. a fess erm. betw. two cats-a-mountain pass. guard. ar.
33) (London). Ar. on a chief sa. three roses of the first.
34) (Tuddington, co. Middlesex). Sa. a chev. erm. betw. three leopards’ faces ar. Crest—A talbot’s head couped sa. guttee d'eau, gorged with a collar gu. rimmed and studded or.
35) (co. Middlesex, and Bromsgrove, co. Worcester). Erm. a chev. chequy or and sa. Crest—A talbot pass. or, collared gu.
36) (Hales, co. Norfolk). Gu. two bars erm. in chief a lion pass. per pale or and ar. Crest—A boar’s head and neck sa. in the mouth a broken spear ppr. headed ar.
37) (Yarmouth and Lynn, co. Norfolk). Gu. two bars erm. in chief a lion pass. or. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a demi lion pass. or, betw. two dragons’ wings expanded of the first, each charged with as many bars of the second.
38) (Silvington, co. Salop). Or, on a chief vert three bulls’ heads couped of the first. Crest—On the horns of a crescent vaire or and az. a bull’s head erased gold.
39) (Parva-Drayton, co. Salop). Az. an eagle displ. ar. over all a bend gu.
40) (Bridgwater, co. Somerset). Gu. a chev. engr. betw. three garbs ar.
41) (Taunton, co. Somerset). (Denham Place, co. Bucks). Gu. a chev. erm. betw. three garbs or. Crest—A dove with wings expanded, in the beak an olive branch all ppr.
42) (Pounsford, co. Somerset). Gu. a chev. betw. three garbs or, a bordure ar. Crest—An eagle, wings expanded ppr. in the beak an acorn slipped vert, fructed or.
43) (Taunton, co. Somerset). Gu. a chev. vair betw. three garbs or.
44) Az. three dolphins embowed or, on a chief of the last as many hurts. Crest—A squirrel sejant ar. collared and lined or.
45) (Littlepipe, co. Stafford; granted 1560). (alias Hull). Az. a chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis or, a canton of the last. Crest—A lion ramp. ar. pierced through the breast with a broken spear in bend ppr. the head guttee de sang.
46) (Bury St. Edmunds, co. Suffolk). Gu. two bars erm. in chief a lion pass. or. Crest—A boar’s head couped sa. in the mouth an acorn or, leaved vert, another acorn as the last stuck upon the head.
47) Sa. on a fesse ar. betw. three cats pass. guard. or, a cross moline betw. two cocks gu. Crest—A buck’s head per pale gu. and az. the nose or, collared of the last.
48) Az. two bars ar. on a quarter sa. a chev. betw. three pheons of the second, charged with a wolf's head erased betw. two mullets gu. Crest—A wolf's head erased az. thereon two bars ar. in the mouth a trefoil slipped vert.
49) Erm. a chev. componee ar. and gu. Crest—A talbot pass. ppr. collared gu.
50) Ar. a fesse betw. six martlets gu.
51) Gu. on a chev. engr. erm. betw. three garbs ar. a cinquefoil of the first.
52) Erm. a chev. lozengy gu. and or.
53) Az. a chev. ar. betw. three goats’ heads erased of the second, armed or.
54) Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three lozenges sa.
55) (Dennis Park, co. Stafford, and Blaenavon, co. Monmouth). Motto—Esse quam videri. Gu. two bars erm. in chief a lion pass. per pale or and ar. Crest—A fleur-de-lis ar.
56) (Alveston, co. Gloucester). Az. on a chev. betw. three owls ar. three mullets sa. a bordure erm.
57) (co. York). Sa. a chev engr. erm. betw. three leopards' faces ar. Crest—A talbot's head and neck couped sa. eared and semee of cinquefoils ar. gorged with a collar gu. edged, ringed, and studded or.
58) (Dilton). Sa. on a chev. engr. erm. betw. in chief two garbs or, and in base on a mount vert a garb, also or, betw. two reaping hooks erect ppr. three palets gu. each charged with an erm. spot of the third. Crest—Upon a mount vert betw. two ears of wheat or, a tower triple-towered ppr. charged with a passion cross or.
59) (Castle-Morton, co. Worcester, Oakhill, co. Hereford, Pepper Hill, co. Salop, and Stallington Hall, co. Stafford; Sarah, only child and heiress of Richard Clarke Hill, Esq., of Stallington Hall, m. 28 Jan. 1835, Sir Smith Child, Bart., of Newfield, co. Stafford, M.P.). Sa. a chev. or, betw. three wild cats pass. guard. ppr. Crest—A hawk ppr. belled or.
60) (Honiley, co. Warwick). Vert six talbots pass. ar.
61) (granted to Edward Smith Hill, Esq.). Motto—Par negotiis neque supra. Gu. a saltire betw. two martlets in pale and as many garbs in fesse or. Crest—A demi leopard ppr. gorged with a collar gemel or, holding betw. the paws a star of eight points or.
62) (John David Hay Hill, Esq., J.P., Gressenhall Hall, co. Norfolk). Gu. two bars erm. in chief a lion pass. or. Crest—A boar’s head erased ppr. holding in the mouth a trefoil vert. Motto—Spe labor levis.
63) (Henry Edward Hill, Esq., Oxford). Vert three talbots pass. ar. Crest—A buck’s head erased, in the mouth an oak sprig ppr.
64) (Very Rev. John Hill, Dean of Kilmore; Fun. Ent. of his wife, Ulster’s Office, 1634). Vert on a chev. betw. three talbots pass. ar. armed and langued gu. a mullet of the last.
65) (Hacketstown, co. Carlow; granted by Roberts, Ulster, 1648, to Arthur Hill, formerly of Winter's Park, Oxenhall, co. Gloucester, and descended from Hill, of Hillhouse, in same co.). Sa. on a chev. invected betw. three bears' heads erased ar. as many pellets. Crest—A greyhound sejant ar. collared az.
66) (Brooke Hall, co. Londonderry, bart.). Motto—Ne tentes aut perfice. Sa. a chev. erminois betw. three leopards’ faces ar. Crest—A talbot’s head couped sa. guttee d'eau, collared gu. studded and ringed or.
67) (St. John's, co. Wexford). Motto—Candide me fides. Ar. two bars ermines, in chief a lion pass. gu. Crest—A demi lion gu.
68) (Graig, Doneraile, co. Cork; settled there for upwards of two centuries, having been previously of Kilmallock, co. Limerick; granted 1560). Motto—Ne tenta, vel perfice. Az. a chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis or, a canton of the last. Crest—A lion ramp. ar. pierced through the breast by a broken spear in bend ppr. the head guttee de sang.
69) (Lambhill, Scotland, 1676). Motto—Veritas superabit montes. (Lambhill, Scotland, 1676). Az. a mount or, with the sun arising and appearing over the top in his splendour ppr. Crest—A Bible expanded ppr.
70) (Merrylee, co. Renfrew, 1865). (Merrylee, co. Renfrew, 1865). Same Arms, within a bordure erm. Same Crest and Motto.
71) (James Matthew Hill, Edinburgh and Bengal, 1858). Motto—Esse quam videri. Az. a mount ar. with the sun arising and appearing over the top in his splendour ppr. on a chief or, a wolf's head erased of the first betw. two eastern crowns gu. Crest—A dexter arm in armour embowed, the hand grasping a dagger all ppr.
72) (Joseph Hill, London, 1858). As the last, within a bordure gu. Same Crest and Motto.
73) (Hillsborough, co. Down; Fun. Ent. of Sir Moses or Moyses Hill, Knt., who accompanied the Earl of Essex to Ireland, 1573, ancestor of the Marquess of Downshire, d. Feb. 1629). Sa. on a fess betw. three leopards pass. guard. or, spotted of the field, as many escallops gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Tower
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91