Hillary Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hillary Family Coat of Arms

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Hillary Coat of Arms Meaning

Hillary Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Hillarie.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Hillary. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Hillary Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Hillary blazon are the chequy, fesse, mullet and fleur-de-lis. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and azure .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Chequy (a word with a surprising number of different spellings!) is what is known as a treatment, a repeating pattern usually used to fill the whole background of the shield with a series of alternately coloured squares 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy. These squares are usually quite small (there should be at least 20 in total), giving the appearance of a chess board, but any combination of colours may be used. It can also be used as a patterning on some of the larger ordinaries, such as the pale and fess, in which case there are three rows of squares. Wade, an authority on heraldic meaning groups chequy with all those heraldic features that are composed of squares and believes that they represent “Constancy”, but also quotes another author Morgan, who says that they can also be associated with “wisdom…verity, probity…and equity”, and offers in evidence the existence of the common English saying that an honest man is a ”Square Dealer” 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100.

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hillary Name

The name Hillary brought to England in the great wave of migration following the Norman Invasion of 1066.  It comes from the old given name Hillary, which originally acquired from the Latin personal name Hilarius, which means cheerful glad, happy and joyful. More common variations are: Hilary, Hillhary, Hillarry, Hillaroy, Hillarey, Hillairy, Hiillary, Hillaery.

The surname Hillary first found in Norfolk where they held a family seat from very early times and granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their true Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 AD. Hilary (c.1110-1169) was an old Priest of Chichester.

Some of the people with the name Hillary who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Susan Hillary, who landed in Virginia in 1652.  Nicholas Hillary, who settled in Nevis in 1654. William Hillary, who settled in Virginia in 1654.  Susanna Hillary, who arrived in Virginia in 1655, and Thomas Hillary, who landed in Maryland in 1661. Some of the people with the surname Hillary who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Samuel Hillary, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1711.  John Hillary, who settled in Charles Town in 1767.  George Hillary, who landed in Savanna(h), Georgia in 1793.

Hillary Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hillary family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Danbury Place, co. Essex, afterwards of Rigg House, co. York, bart., extinct 1855). Ar. three fleurs-de-lis sa. betw. six crosses crosslet az. a bordure of the second. Crest—Out of a mural crown gu. a cubit arm armed ppr. garnished and the joints embattled or, the gauntlet holding a chevaltrap of the last, round the arm a scarf vert. Supporters—Two lions ar. each gorged with a collar or, fimbriated sa. charged with a fleur-de-lis betw. two crosses crosslet of the last. Motto—Virtuti nihil invium.
2) (co. Leicester). Sa. crusily three fleurs-de-lis and a bordure engr. ar.
3) (Daver, co. Norfolk). Ar. a fesse chequy or and sa. (another, of the first and sa.) in chief a mullet of the third.
4) (co. Norfolk). Ar. a fesse counter-componee or and gu.
5) (Hadley, co. Suffolk). Same Arms, a mullet sa. for diff.
6) Sa. three crosses crosslet, two and one, and five fleurs-de-lis ar. one, two, and two.
7) Ar. six crosses crosslet fitchee sa. three, two, and one.
8) (co. Warwick, and Maringe, co. York). Ar. three fleurs-de-lis az. betw. six crosses crosslet fitchee sa. a crescent gu. for diff. Crest—A cubit arm erect in armour ppr. holding in the gauntlet a caltrap ar. round the arm a sash vert.
9) Ar. semee of crosslets sa. three fleurs-de-lis of the last. Crest—A griffin's head holding in the beak a key ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105