Hoyle Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hoyle Family Coat of Arms

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Hoyle Coat of Arms Meaning

Hoyle Name Origin & History

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Hoyle Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Hoyle blazon are the lion and mullet. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, sable and or .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 12A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 15A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hoyle Name

Hoyle Origin:
England

Origins of Hoyle:
This unusual and interesting name is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a geographical surname found especially in the north and northwest of England, where it used as a local variant of the southern name Hole or Houle.  The origin is from the Olde English pre 7th Century term “holh,” which means hole, empty, depression, used as a geographical surname for a person who resided in or by a hollow or low-lying spot.  Geographical surnames were among the earliest created since both natural and artificial features in the landscape provided easily recognizable distinguishing names in the small villages of the Middle Ages.  The new surname from this source can found as Hoyle, Hoile, and the genitive forms Hoyles and Hoiles, the “s” showing “of” such a place.  The marriage of Richard Hoyle and Johanna Gledhill noted at Elland in Yorkshire, in June 1573.

Variations:
More common variations are: Hoyley, Hoylie, Hoyale, Hoysle, Hole, Hoyl, Hoysley, Hoole, Hoile.

England:
The surname Hoyle first appeared in Monmouthshire (Welsh: Sir Fynwy), where they held a family seat from very early times, some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Thomas de Hoyle, dated 1248, in the Curia Regis Rolls of Yorkshire.   It was during the reign of King Henry 111, which was known as “The Frenchman,” dated 1216-1272.  Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:
Many of the people with surname Hoyle had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Hoyle landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th.    Some of the people with the name Hoyle who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Jeremiah Hoyle settled in Virginia in 1638.  Elizabeth Hoyle settled in Barbados in 1663.  Seth Hoyle, who arrived in Maryland in 1669

People with the surname Hoyle who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Kath Hoyle, who came to Virginia in 1705.  Peter Hoyle, who arrived in North Carolina in 1738.  Jurig Thomas Hoyle, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1739.  Henrick Hoyle, aged 40, landed in Pennsylvania in 1739.  George Hoyle, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1760.

The following century saw more Hoyle surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Hoyle who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Luke Hoyle, aged 15, landed in Connecticut in 1812.  Robert Hoyle, who landed in New York in 1812.  Jackson P Hoyle, aged 36, landed in North Carolina in 1812.  Henry Hoyle, who arrived in New York in 1820.  William Hoyle arrived in New York with his wife and child in 1820

Australia:
Some of the individuals with the surname Hoyle who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Jesse Hoyle arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Glenswilly” in 1839.  Robin Hoyle arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Glenswilly” in 1839.  Duncan Hoyle arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Glenswilly” in 1839.

New-Zealand:
Some of the population with the surname Hoyle who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Martha Hoyle at the age of 17, a servant, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Arawa” in 1884.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hoyle:
United States 10,081; England 6,480; Australia 953; Peru 755; Canada 739; South Africa 475; New Zealand 426; Scotland 263; Wales 158; France 147.

Notable People:
Arthur Robert Hoyle (1922 –May 2012) was an Australian professor and biographer.  He was Born in Sydney, Australia, in 1922 to Arthur Hoyle (1896–1971) and Gertrude Underwood (1895–1972), he served in the Royal Air Force as a pilot during World War II with 460 Squadron and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. He came back to Australia and married Moira Peisley (1924–1998).

Herbert Hoyle (April 1920 –July 2003) was a professional football player who played as a goalkeeper in The Football League for Exeter City and Bristol Rovers.  He was born in Baildon, West Yorkshire, and began his job with local side Bradford Park Avenue, joining them in 1936 aged sixteen, but left to join the armed forces without having made his League debut.

Dean Hoyle (born April 1967) is the founder and previous owner of Card Factory and the current chairman and owner of Football League Championship side Huddersfield Town and based in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire.

Hoyle Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hoyle family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Ar. two lions combatant sa. Crest—A demi lion ramp. reguard. or, holding betw. the paws a shield az. charged with a sun gold.
2) (Upper Swift Plaсе. Ripponden, co. York, and Denton, co. Northumberland). Erm. a mullet or.
3) (Eastwood Lodge, Rotherham, co. York; confirmed to Fretwell William Hoyle, Esq., eldest son and heir of William Fretwell Hoyle, Esq., of Ferham House, co. York, and their descendants). Motto—Facta non verba. Per pale or and erm. a mullet sa. Crest—An eagle’s head erased ppr. charged on the neck with a mullet sa. and holding in the beak a white rose slipped ppr.
4) (confirmed by Hawkins, Ulster. 1715. to Doctor Richard Hoyle, eldest son of John Hoyle, Captain of a Company of Foot in the army of Charles II., descended from Hoyle, of Light Hazell, co. York). Ar. a fess az. betw. three mullets sa. Crest—A lion couchant or, charged on the shoulder with a mullet sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
12. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
15. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105