Hubbard Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hubbard Family Coat of Arms

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Hubbard Coat of Arms Meaning

Hubbard Name Origin & History

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Hubbard Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hubbard blazon are the annulet, estoile and leopard’s face. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and or.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the annulet is a good example, being a circular ring of any colour. They also appear interlaced or one within the other, both of which are very pleasing additions. Wade believes that these were one of the symbols of ancient pilgrims. 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19

There were of course many widely recognised symbols that existed long before the advent of heraldry and it should be no surprise that some of these were adopted as charge in coats of arms 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301. The estoile is a typical example, reflecting the stars in the sky and represented with six wavy points, often with a little shading to give it some depth. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile. The ancient writer Guillim assigns these symbols as the emblems of God’s goodness”. 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hubbard Name

Hubbard Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Hubbard was of the Anglo-Saxon variety, deriving from the Anglo-Saxon personal name of “Hugibert” or “Hubert.” These names had the elements of “hug” which can be translated to mean “heart,” and the element of “beorht” which can be interpreted as meaning “bright” or “famous” –which made this surname very popular in the earliest time of its discovery. This surname of Hubbard was believed to be introduced in England and Wales by the Saxon invaders in the 8th Century, but did appear in the Doomsday Book of 1086. The popularity of this surname can also be attributed to the patron saint of hunting, St. Hubert, and England being a country that largely enjoys hunting as as sport or recreational activity.

Variations:

More common variations are:

Hubbarde, Hubbeard, Hubbardd, Hubbared, Hiubbard, Haubbard, Hubbaerd, Hubbarrd, Hobbard, Hubberd, Hubbet, Hubert, Hobart

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Hubbard is believed to be in the country of England and in the year of 1327. This person was recorded as being named as one Roger Hubard, who was mentioned and recorded in the document entitled the Subsidy Rolls of Somerset. This document was ordered and decreed under the reign of one King Edward III, who was known as and commonly referred to throughout history as the “Father of the Navy.” King Edward III ruled as the King of England from the year 1327 to the year 1377. Other mentions of the surname of Hubbard in England include one John Gellibrand Hubbard, who lived from the year 1805 to the year 1889 and was the Director of the Bank of England, and was eventually named as the first Baron Addington by Queen Victoria in the year of 1887. Those who bore this surname in the country of England were found all over the region, but originated in the County of Leicestershire. Eventually, this surname spread to the counties of Norfolk, Yorkshire, Warwickshire and Suffolk, Cheshire, Lincolnshire, and the city of London.

Scotland:

Those who bear the surname of Hubbard can also be found in large concentrations in the country of Scotland. These families who bear the surname of Hubbard can be found in the areas of Lanarkshire County and Perthshire County.

United States of America:

During the early 1600’s, it became common for settlers from Europe, specifically England, to move from their home country in search of a new life. These people were often seeking freedom from religious persecution, as well as a better life, with better living conditions. These people sought out this new life in the United States of America, which at that time was called the New World or the Colonies. The first person to make it to the United States to start their new life with this surname was one William Hubbard, who landed in the city of Ipswich, in the state of Massachusetts in the year 1630. Those who bear the surname of Hubbard can be found in many states throughout the United States of America. The states that have the higher concentration of those who bear this surname of Hubbard are the states of Texas, Illinois, Washington, Michigan, Virginia, Missouri, Kentucky New York, Massachusetts, California, and the state of North Carolina.

Hubbard Today:

United States 78,589

England 9,922

Canada 2,995

Australia 2,744

South Africa 1,991

Mexico 1,073

New Zealand 783

Scotland 368

Wales 327

France 282

Notable People:

Marvin “Marvelous Marv” Hubbard (1946-2015) who was a college and professional football player in America was inducted into the Colgate University Athletic Hall of Honor in the year 1995

Mrs. Alice Hubbard (died in 1915) who was a 1st Class Passenger from East Aurora, New York who was on board of the RMS Lusitania when the vessel began to sink in the year 1915, and died in the sinking

Mr. Elbert Green Hubbard (died in 1915) who was a 1st Class Passenger from East Aurora, New York who was on board of the RMS Lusitania when the vessel began to sink in the year 1915, and died in the sinking

Arthur J. Hubbard Sr. (1912-2014) who was an Arizona State Senator who also served as a Navajo Code Talker Instructor in World War II

Charles Hubbard, who was a silver Olympic medalist in archery, from America, and earned that medal in the 1904 Olympic games

Frank Twombly Hubbard (1920-1976) who was a harpsichord maker from the United States of America

Frederick Dewayne “Freddie” Hubbard (1938-2008) who was a jazz trumpeter from America

Hubbard Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hubbard family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Durham). Sa. in chief a crescent ar. and in base an estoile of eight points or, betw. two flaunches erm. Crest—A wolf pass. or.
2) (Freeby, co. Leicester). Gu. on a bend ar. three leopards’ faces sa. Crest—A Saracen’s head ppr.
3) (Wyfordby, co. Leicester). Gu. on a bend sa. three annulets or. Crest—A wolf's head erased.
4) (Barleythorpe, co. Rutland. Visit. Rutland, 1618). Ar. on a bend sa. nine annulets, three, three, and three, interlaced or.
Vert a chev. betw. three eagles’ heads erased ar. ducally gorged gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65