Hudson Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hudson Family Coat of Arms

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Hudson Coat of Arms Meaning

Hudson Name Origin & History

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Hudson Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Hudson blazon are the per chevron embattled, escallop, martlet and boar’s head. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, argent and azure .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

To add variety and interest to the arms, heraldic artists began to divide the background of the shield into two parts, giving each a different colour. They were named for the ordinary that they most resembled, so the division of the shield by an inverted ‘V’ shape, similar to the ordinary known as the chevron came to be called per chevron 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P63. Visually rather striking, it became popular and artists added decorative effects to the partition line to distinguish otherwise very similar coats of arms. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Party. An edge which is decorated like the top of a castle wall is said to be embattled, or sometimes crenelle, from the original French. (In castle building terminology the parts of the wall that stick up are known as merlons, and the resulting gaps as crenels). A whole sub-section of heraldic terminology has sprung up to describe whether these crennellations appear on which edges, whether they line up or alternate, have additional steps or rounded tops. The interested reader is directed to the reference for the full set! 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Embattled For obvious reasons, use of this decoration is to be associated with castles and fortified towns, an early authority, Guillim suggest also some association with fire, but with out clear reason 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P41. In all, this is one of the more common, and most effective and appropriate of the decorative edges.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hudson Name

Hudson Origin:

Scotland, England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Hudson is said to originate within the cultures of Scotland and England. The surname of Hudson is said to derived from the personal given name of “Hudde” which can possibly come from three different origins. The first origin of the personal given name of “Hudde” and thus the first origin of the surname of Hudson is that it was a nickname. It is a common element of surnames throughout Europe that many of them originally derived from nicknames, as it was a very common practice in medieval times. In the beginning, nicknames were applied to people who had distinguishing characteristics, such as moral or mental peculiarities, a similar appearance to a bird or animal, a similar disposition to a bird or animal, occupation of an individual, their habits, or their manner of dress. The nickname of “Hugh” could possibly have been an origin for this surname of Hudson. “Hugh” can be translated to mean “mind or heart.” The personal given name of Hudde may have also been a nickname for someone named “Ricard” or “Richard.” The third possible origin of the personal given name of Hudde, and thus the surname of Hudson is that it came from the Old English personal name of “Huda,” which was used to name various towns around England. Thus, the surname of Hudson may also be locational, which means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. Another possible variant of this surname is that it came from the surname of Hutson.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hutson, Hotson, Heudson, Huddson, Houdson, Hudison, Hudsson, Hudsoon, Hudwson, Haudson, Hudsonw, Hudsown

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Hudson was found in the country of England. One person by the name of William Hudde was named and mentioned in the Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire in the year of 1273. This document, the Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Edward I, who was known throughout the ages as one “The Hammer of the Scots.” King Edward I was such nicknamed for all of the wars and conquests that he waged on the country of Scotland during his reign, which was from the year 1272 to the year 1307. Those who bear the surname of Hudson in the country of England can be found in the counties of Yorkshire, Devonshire, and in Cornwall in high concentrations.

United States of America:

Those who bear the surname of Hudson can be found in large quantities throughout the United States of America. The areas that have the highest concentration of those who are known to bear the surname of Hudson can be found in the states of Arkansas, Texas, Oklahoma, and within the state of California.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hudson: United States 147,730; England 33,271; Brazil 15,772; Australia 11,822; Canada 8,930; South Africa 7,525; Uganda 5,788; Nigeria 3,210; Jamaica 2,302; New Zealand 2,232

Notable People:

Captain William Leverth Hudson USN (1794-1862) who served as an officer in the United States Navy

Timothy Adam “Tim” Hudson (born in 1975) who is a Major League Baseball pitcher from America who played with the Atlanta Braves

Saul Hudson (born in 1965) who is most notably recognized by his stage name of Slash, who is a musician and songwriter from England, who is known for his stint as the lead singer of the American hard rock band Guns N’ Roses, and who was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in the year 2012

Rock Hudson (1925-1985) who was born with the name of Roy Harold Scherer Jr. and who was a four-time Golden Globe winning actor, who was most notably recognized for his roles in comedy stints with the actress Doris Day

Kate Hudson (born in 1979) who is an Oscar-nominated actress from America

Ernie Hudson (born in 1945) who is a playwright and actor from America

Brett Hudson (born in 1953) who is a musician, singer and songwriter from America, and who is one of the Hudson brothers

Ray Hudson (born in 1955) who is a former football player and coach from England

Hudson Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hudson family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Melton Mowbray, co. Leicester, bart., extinct). Per chev. embattled ar. and gu. three escallops counterchanged. Crest—A griffin’s head erased ar. gorged with a mural crown gu. charged with three escallops of the first.
2) (Wanlip, co. Leicester, bart.; Sir Charles Thomas Hudson, second bart., assumed the surname of Palmer by royal licence, 1813. See Palmer, Bart., of Wanlip). Per chev. embattled or and az. three martlets counterchanged. Crest—A martlet or.
3) (London). Quarterly, per fesse embattled or and sa. three martlets counterchanged. Crest—A dexter hand erect, holding with the thumb and forefinger a bezant ppr.
4) (London). Per chev. embattled or and vert three martlets counterchanged. Crest—A martlet vert winged or.
5) (Park Crescent, Portland Place). Or, on a fesse betw. three boars' heads couped gu. as many lions ramp. of the field. Crest—A lion's head erased or.
6) (Preston, co. Lancaster). Gu. on a fesse or, betw. three boars’ heads erased ar. as many lions ramp. sa. Crest—A lion holding a boar's head erased betw. the forepaws all ppr.
7) Same Arms, the boars’ heads couped. Crest—A lion ramp. or, holding betw. the paws a boar's head couped sa.
8) Per chev. embattled or and az. three martlets counterchanged. Crest—A martlet sa. wings or. Another Crest—On a rock ar. a martlet or (another, on a tower ar. a martlet az.).
9) (Donaldson-Hudson, Cheswardine Hall, co. Chester; exemplified to Charles Donaldson, Esq., second son of John Donaldson, and grandson of Alexander Donaldson, by Elizabeth Hudson, his wife, upon taking the additional name and arms of Hudson, by royal licence, 30 Jan. 1862, on succeeding to the estates of his great uncle, Thomas Hudson, Esq.). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, on a fesse dancettee betw. two boars’ heads couped in chief and a lion ramp. in base gu. two martlets of the field, for Hudson; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a lymphad sa. betw. three dolphins naiant az., for Donaldson. Crests—1st: Upon a mill-rind fesseways sa. a lion’s head erased or, gorged with a bar gemel indented gu., for Hudson; 2nd: In front of a saltire az. a cubit arm erect grasping a dagger and charged with a thistle slipped both ppr., for Donaldson.
10) (granted 10 April, 1766, to Elizabeth Hudson, dau. and heir of Thomas Wilson, of Burlington, co. York, merchant, relict of Benjamin Hudson, of Burlington, eldest son of William Hudson, of the same place, merchant; the arms of Hudson to be borne by the descendants of William, and the arms of Wilson by her descendants as a quartering). Per chev. embattled or and az. three martlets counterchanged, two and one, those in chief charged on the breast with a fret of the first, and that in base with a fret sa. Arms of Wilson—Sa. a wolf saliant or, plain collared az. in chief three estoiles ar.
11) Ar. a cross moline betw. two lozenges in chief and a boar’s head couped in base sa. armed or.
12) (William Hudson, Esq., of Frogmore Lodge, co. Herts.) Gu. on a fesse betw. three boars' heads erased ar. as many lions ramp. sa. Crest—A lion ramp. holding a boar's head erased all ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P63
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Party
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Embattled
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P41
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79