Hull Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hull Family Coat of Arms

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Hull Coat of Arms Meaning

Hull Name Origin & History

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Hull Coat of Arms Meaning

The main device (symbol) in the Hull blazon is the lozenge. The two main tinctures (colors) are ermine and gules.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the lozenge Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. It can appear on its own, voided (with the background visible through the middle), and can also be conjoined, whereby adjacent lozenges touch point-to-point. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lozenge Guillim groups the lozenge with all square shapes as being symbolic of “verity, probity, constancy and equity”. 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P262

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hull Name

Hull Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Hull has many possible origins that this surname could have derived from. One of these possible origins is that the surname of Hull is an English locational surname, which means that the original people who bore this surname are from an area named near or with the same meaning as the surname. These locational surnames were created in order to identify new migrant workers from the current workers, and it was determined that the easiest way to do this was by using the name of their birthplace. The places in England where those who bear this surname could be from are in the counties of Cheshire, Somerset, and the East Riding of Yorkshire. These places are often referred to as Hulle throughout history. This original surname comes from the Old English Pre 7th Century world of “hyll” which can be translated to mean “hill” and may also be used to name someone who lived on, near, or around a hill or structure that was deemed as such in this time period. The name evolved from including the Old English “y” sound to later throughout history and development be replaced with the Middle English “u,” which created the new, evolved spelling of the word and the surname as such. This surname was also have originated from the personal name of Hulle, which was a nickname, or pet name of the personal name of Hugh.

Variations:

More common variations are:

Hulle, Hully, Houll, Huell, Hulia, Hulle, Hulli, Hullu, Hullo, Haull, Huill

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Hull was found in the country of England in the year 1199. This person, who was named as one Peter de Hull, was recorded in the “Assize Court Rolls of Staffordshire.” This document, the “Assize Court Rolls of Staffordshire” was ordered and decreed by one King John of England, who was known as and commonly referred to throughout history as the “Lackland” and ruled from the year of 1199, to the year of 1216. Other mentions of this surname in the country of England included John ate Hulle in the year 1201, who was recorded in the “Ministers Accounts of the Earldom of Cornwall”. Another instance if of Hulle le Bule appeared in the Pipe Rolls for Staffordshire in the year 1201, and one Henry Hull is noted in the Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield in Yorkshire in the year 1309. Those who bear the surname of Hull are found in the counties of Yorkshire, Lanarkshire, Essex, Bedfordshire, and the city of London.

Scotland:

Those who bear the surname of Hull can also be found in the country of Scotland. These people who bear this surname of Hull can be found in the counties of Lanarkshire and Midlothian.

United States of America:

During the 1600’s European settlers began to migrate to the United States of America, looking for a better life. The first person who bore the surname of Hull to arrive in the United States was one Jefferie Hull, who was reported to have landed in the state of Virginia in the year 1617. Those who bear the surname of Hull can be found residing in the states of New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Florida, Michigan, Nebraska, Washington, Ohio, Illinois, California, and the state of Kansas.

Hull Today:

United States 49,795

England 10,185

Australia 3,771

Canada 3,313

South Africa 2,447

Northern Ireland 799

Germany 706

New Zealand 689

Mexico 471

Poland 430

Notable People:

Isaac Hull (1773-1843) who was a Commodore in the United States Navy, who was also the Captain of the USS Constitution during the battle with HMS Guerriere

Lieutenant-General John E. Hull (1895-1975) who was a Commander in Chief in the United Nations Far East from the year 1953 to the year 1955, and was from America

William Hull (1753-1825) who was a General in the War of 1812, and the Governor of Michigan Territory, who was best remembered from surrendering Fort Detroit to the British, and was from America

Arthur J. Hull, who was a Member of the Connecticut State House of Representatives from Monroe, and was elected in the years of 1904 and 1906, who was an American Republican politician

Amos Hull, who was a Member of the Connecticut State House of Representatives from North Stonington in the year 1837, and who was an American politician

Alex C. Hull, who was the Secretary of State of Arkansas from the year 1897 to the year 1900, and was a politician from America

Hull Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Hull has many possible origins that this surname could have derived from. One of these possible origins is that the surname of Hull is an English locational surname, which means that the original people who bore this surname are from an area named near or with the same meaning as the surname. These locational surnames were created in order to identify new migrant workers from the current workers, and it was determined that the easiest way to do this was by using the name of their birthplace. The places in England where those who bear this surname could be from are in the counties of Cheshire, Somerset, and the East Riding of Yorkshire. These places are often referred to as Hulle throughout history. This original surname comes from the Old English Pre 7th Century world of “hyll” which can be translated to mean “hill” and may also be used to name someone who lived on, near, or around a hill or structure that was deemed as such in this time period. The name evolved from including the Old English “y” sound to later throughout history and development be replaced with the Middle English “u,” which created the new, evolved spelling of the word and the surname as such. This surname was also have originated from the personal name of Hulle, which was a nickname, or pet name of the personal name of Hugh.

Variations:

More common variations are:

Hulle, Hully, Houll, Huell, Hulia, Hulle, Hulli, Hullu, Hullo, Haull, Huill

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Hull was found in the country of England in the year 1199. This person, who was named as one Peter de Hull, was recorded in the “Assize Court Rolls of Staffordshire.” This document, the “Assize Court Rolls of Staffordshire” was ordered and decreed by one King John of England, who was known as and commonly referred to throughout history as the “Lackland” and ruled from the year of 1199, to the year of 1216. Other mentions of this surname in the country of England included John ate Hulle in the year 1201, who was recorded in the “Ministers Accounts of the Earldom of Cornwall”. Another instance if of Hulle le Bule appeared in the Pipe Rolls for Staffordshire in the year 1201, and one Henry Hull is noted in the Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield in Yorkshire in the year 1309. Those who bear the surname of Hull are found in the counties of Yorkshire, Lanarkshire, Essex, Bedfordshire, and the city of London.

Scotland:

Those who bear the surname of Hull can also be found in the country of Scotland. These people who bear this surname of Hull can be found in the counties of Lanarkshire and Midlothian.

United States of America:

During the 1600’s European settlers began to migrate to the United States of America, looking for a better life. The first person who bore the surname of Hull to arrive in the United States was one Jefferie Hull, who was reported to have landed in the state of Virginia in the year 1617. Those who bear the surname of Hull can be found residing in the states of New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Florida, Michigan, Nebraska, Washington, Ohio, Illinois, California, and the state of Kansas.

Hull Today:

United States 49,795

England 10,185

Australia 3,771

Canada 3,313

South Africa 2,447

Northern Ireland 799

Germany 706

New Zealand 689

Mexico 471

Poland 430

Notable People:

Isaac Hull (1773-1843) who was a Commodore in the United States Navy, who was also the Captain of the USS Constitution during the battle with HMS Guerriere

Lieutenant-General John E. Hull (1895-1975) who was a Commander in Chief in the United Nations Far East from the year 1953 to the year 1955, and was from America

William Hull (1753-1825) who was a General in the War of 1812, and the Governor of Michigan Territory, who was best remembered from surrendering Fort Detroit to the British, and was from America

Arthur J. Hull, who was a Member of the Connecticut State House of Representatives from Monroe, and was elected in the years of 1904 and 1906, who was an American Republican politician

Amos Hull, who was a Member of the Connecticut State House of Representatives from North Stonington in the year 1837, and who was an American politician

Alex C. Hull, who was the Secretary of State of Arkansas from the year 1897 to the year 1900, and was a politician from America

Hull Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hull family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Erm. three lozenges gu.
2) Az. three eagles displ. ar.
3) (co. Buckingham, Larkbeare, co. Devon, Osterley, co. Durham, Battersea, co. Surrey, and London, 1616). (Battersea, co. Surrey; confirmed 25 Jan. 1624). Sa. a chev. erm. betw. three talbots’ heads erased ar. Crest—A talbot's bead erased ar. betw. two laurel branches ppr. united at the top.
4) (St. Leonard’s, co. Cornwall, and Oxford). Sa. a chev. betw. three talbots’ heads erased ar.
5) (co. Cornwall). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three water bougets sa.
6) (co. Devon). Az. a chev. ar. betw. three chaplets or.
7) (Child-Ockford, co. Dorset, temp. Henry III.). Or, a bull pass. aa. collared and belled gold.
8) (co. Durham). Per pale az. and gu. a chev. or, betw. three fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest—A cubit arm grasping a fleur-de-lis.
9) (Olneston, co. Gloucester). Az. on a chev. betw. three owls ar. as many mullets sa. a bordure engr. erm.
10) (Hammersmith, co. Middlesex). Sa. a chev. embattled betw. three talbots’ heads erased ar.
11) (co. Stafford). Ar. a chev. gu. (another, sa.) betw. three water bougets sa.
12) (Hameldon, co. Surrey). Ar. on a chev. az. betw. three demi lions ramp. gu. as many plates (another, bezants).
13) (co. Surrey). Ar. on a chev. az. betw. three demi lions gu. as many bezants, on a chief sa. two piles of the field. Crest—A dragon’s head couped sa. eared gu. collared or, charged with three torteaux, on the neck a pale ar. betw. four plates.
14) Az. an eagle displ. or. Crest—A hunting horn az. garnished ar.
15) Per fesse or and ar. three suns sa.
16) Ar. a pale lozengy gu. on the second a mullet or.
17) Or, three roses gu.
18) Erm. three fusils gu.
19) Per pale ar. and sa. a chev. betw. three dolphins naiant counterchanged.
20) (impalement Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1662). Ar. on a chev. az. betw. three demi lions ramp. gu. as many bezants, a chief point en point sa. and of the first.
21) (Clonakilty, co. Cork; Fun. Ent. 1637, Henry Hull, brother of Sir William Hull, Knt., sons of Henry Hull, Esq., of Exeter, co. Devon; descended from a second son of Hull, of Larkbeare, in same co.). Sa. a chev. erm. betw. three talbots’ heads erased ar. Crest—A talbot’s head couped ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lozenge
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P262