Hunter Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hunter Family Coat of Arms

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Hunter Coat of Arms Meaning

Hunter Name Origin & History

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Hunter Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Hunter blazon are the hunting horn and greyhound. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, argent and or .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The hunting horn, or bugle horn has a distinctive shape, being curved almost into a semi-circle, it can be decorated with bands of a different colour and typically hangs from a string, also coloured. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:hunting horn. Apart from its obvious reference to the pursuit of hunting, it has also been used in allusion to the name of the holderr (HUNTER of Hunterston) and Woowward suggests it is also associated with those who have rights or obligations to the forest. 10A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P400

Unlike many of the creatures to be found in heraldry, the Greyhound is shown in a very natural aspect and lifelike poses. 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204 It is probably the most common member of the dog family to be found in arms 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog, and Wade suggests that we see in its appearance the suggestion of“courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hunter Name

Hunter Origin:

Scotland, England

Origins of Hunter:

The surname of Hunter is said to hail from the countries of Scotland and England. Originally, the surname of Hunter derived from the Old English Pre 7th Century word of “hunta” itself from the Old English word of “huntian” which is comprised of “hunta” which can be translated to mean “to hunt” and with the addition of the suffix of “er” which can be translated to mean “one who works,” or “one who works with.” In the Middle Ages, the surname of Hunter was used to describe people who hunted on horseback, and was used for those in the status of nobility. The surname of Hunter is occupational, meaning that the original bearer of the surname of Hunter actually carried out this job. Occupational surnames were not originally hereditary surnames. They only became hereditary if the son followed in his father’s footsteps for a career; then the surname became hereditary and was used by the children and spouse of the son. This surname of Hunter also served as a nickname for people who were bird hunters and catchers, as well as poachers. It is a common element of surnames throughout Europe that many of them originally derived from nicknames, as it was a very common practice in medieval times. In the beginning, nicknames were applied to people who had distinguishing characteristics, such as moral or mental peculiarities, a similar appearance to a bird or animal, a similar disposition to a bird or animal, occupation of an individual, their habits, or their manner of dress.

Variations:

More common variations are: Huntsman, Haunter, Huntter, Hunnter, Huunter, Huinter, Huntera, Huanter, Huneter, Hunteer, Huntere

History:

Scotland:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Hunter was found within the country of Scotland. One person who was named as William Huntar was mentioned in the Registers of Scotland, which are also known as the Inquisition of Earl David in the year 1116, under the reign of King Alexander I of Scotland. King Alexander was known throughout history as “The Fierce” and ruled from the year 1107 to the year 1124. Also within the country of Scotland were the Hunter family who named the Port of Hunterson within the Ayrshire County. Those who carry the surname of Hunter can be found within the areas of Ayrshire, and all throughout the southern region of the country of Scotland.

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Hunter within the country of England was in the year of 1220. One person by the name of Simon Huntere was mentioned in the Curia Regis Rolls for the County of Bedfordshire in the year of 1220. Other mentions of this surname can be found in the Hundred Rolls of Huntingdon in the year 1273, with Agnes Huntris. Those who bear the surname of Hunter within the country of England can be found in the areas of Yorkshire, Durham, Lancashire, and Northumberland counties in large concentrations.

United States of America:

Those who are known by the surname of Hunter within the United States of America can be found throughout the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Georgia, New York, Illinois, Texas, and in the state of California.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hunter: United States 175,068; England 34,696; Canada 21,182; Australia 18,575; Scotland 11,006; South Africa 10,830; New Zealand 4,052; Northern Ireland 2,993; Jamaica 2,963; Brazil 1,987

Notable People:

John Thurman Hunter Jr. (1931-2016) who was a musician from Texas who went by the stage name Long John Hunter and who was a singer, guitarist, and songwriter of blues and electric blues

Whiteside Godfrey Hunter (1841-1917) who was a Republican politician from America who was also a physician and a member of the Kentucky state house of representative for the year 1874 as qwll as the United States Minister to Guatemala from the year 1897 to the year 1903 as well as the United States Minister to Honduras for the year 1897

Grover C. Hunter, who was a politician from America as well as a member of the Georgia State House of Representatives for Troup County from the year 1949 to the year 1950

Grover C. Hunter, who was a politician from America and who was also a member of the West Virginia State House of Delegates for Wayne County from the year 1937 to the year 1938

Robert Hunter (1886-1971) who was an Olympic Athlete from America who won a both a Gold and a Silver medal in the sport of golf at the 1904 Summer Olympic Games

Hunter Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hunter family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Hunterston, co. Ayr; sometimes styled “of that Ilk, Praefectus Venatorum Regiorum in Cuninghame;" ancient arms as reverted to in 1865, by Robert Hunter, of Hunterston, heir of line of the family). [At and prior to the commencement of the 17th century we find this family bearing, “ Vert three dogs of chase argent, on a chief of the second three hunting horns of the first bandressit gules." The present Hunter of Hunterston submitted his claims to the Lord Lyon, who “ratified, maintained, and confirmed to him ” the original arms, with Crest, motto, and supporters as above detailed.] Motto—Cursum perficio. Or, three hunting horns vert, garnished and stringed gu. Crest—A greyhound sejant ppr. gorged with an antique crown or. Supporters—Two greyhounds ppr. gorged with antique crowns or.
2) (Hunterston, co. Ayr; sometimes styled “of that Ilk, Praefectus Venatorum Regiorum in Cuninghame;" ancient arms as reverted to in 1865, by Robert Hunter, of Hunterston, heir of line of the family). [At and prior to the commencement of the 17th century we find this family bearing, “ Vert three dogs of chase argent, on a chief of the second three hunting horns of the first bandressit gules." The present Hunter of Hunterston submitted his claims to the Lord Lyon, who “ratified, maintained, and confirmed to him ” the original arms, with Crest, motto, and supporters as above detailed.] Motto—Cursum perficio. Vert three dogs of chase argent, on a chief of the second three hunting horns of the first bandressit gules,
3) (David Hunter, Calcutta, heir male of Hunterston, 1826). Motto—Cursum perficio. Vert three greyhounds courant ar. collared or, on a chief wavy of the second three hunting horns of the first, stringed gu. Crest—A greyhound sejant ar. collared or. Supporters—Two greyhounds ar. collared or.
4) (Restennet, co. Forfar, 1672). Motto—Jucunditate afficior. Vert three greyhounds courant ar. collared or, on a chief engr. of the second three hunting horns of the first, stringed gu. Crest—A fir tree ppr.
5) (St. Lucar, 1775). Motto—Raised again. Vert two greyhounds courant in pale ar. on a chief engr. of the last a boar’s head erased sa. betw. two hunting horns of the first, stringed gu. Crest—An anchor ppr.
6) (Polmood, co. Peebles). Ar. three hunting horns vert, stringed gu.
7) (Ballagan, co. Dumfries). Ar. a crescent az. betw. three hunting horns vert, stringed gu.
8) (David Hunter, cadet of Polmood, 1738). Motto—Fortuna sequatur. Ar. a chev. wavy az. betw. three hunting horns vert, stringed gu. Crest—A dexter and sinister hand and arm holding a bow and arrow in full draught ppr.
9) (Ayr, 1680). Motto—Expedite. Vert three collars or, on a chief indented ar. as many hunting horns of the first, garnished and stringed gu. Crest—A greyhound in full course ar. collared or.
10) (Barjarg, co. Dumfries). Motto—Vigilantia robur voluptas. As the last, within a bordure ar. charged with four roses or, barbed vert. Crest—A stag's head erased ppr.
11) (Thurston, co. Haddington). Motto—Vigilantia robur voluptas. Vert three hunting horns ar. garnished gu. on a chief of the second two boars’ heads couped of the third. Crest—A stag's head erased ppr.
12) (Hafton, co. Argyll). Motto—Spero. Vert three hunting horns ar. garnished gu. and stringed or, within a bordure of the last. Crest—An anchor in pale ppr.
13) (Glencarse, co. Perth, 1792). Motto—Dum spiro spero. Vert three greyhounds in pale in full speed ar. collared gu. within a bordure or, on a chief wavy of the second a fleur-de-lis az. betw. two hunting horns of the field, garnished of the fourth and stringed of the third. Crest—A greyhound's head and neck ar. collared gu.
14) (Burnside, co. Forfar). Motto—Spero. Ar. a man’s heart ppr. betw. three hunting horns vert, stringed gu. Crest—A hunting horn, as in the arms.
15) (Manchester, 1866). Motto—Dum spiro spero. Per fess ar. and vert three hunting horns counterchanged, garnished and stringed gu. Crest—A greyhound’s head erased ppr.
16) (Dean Burn, co. Roxburgh, 1875). Motto—Far and sure. Per fess wavy or and az. in chief two hunting horns vert, garnished and stringed gu. in base an anchor ar. Crest—A dexter and a sinister arm shooting an arrow from a bow all ppr.
17) (Mortimer Hill, co. Berks, bart., Lord Mayor of London, 1811-12). Or, a lion ramp. gu. betw. eight crosses pattée fitchée sa. Crest—A demi lion holding betw. the paws a cross pattée fitchée, as in the arms.
18) (co. Durham). Gu. on a fesse or, betw. three stags’ heads erased of the second as many buglehorns stringed sa. Crest—A buglehorn vert, garnished or, stringed gu.
19) (alias Perry) (Wotton-under-Edge, co. Gloucester). Ar. on a chev. az. betw. three lions ramp. gu. as many buglehorns or.
20) (Medolmsley, co. Durham). Motto—Vigilantia robur voluptas. Gu. on a chev. or, betw. three bucks’ heads erased of the second as many buglehorns stringed sa. Crest—A deer’s head.
21) (granted to William Henry Hunter, Esq.). Per pale vert and gu. a sun in splendour or, betw. three greyhounds courant, two and one ar. collared of the second, a chief engr. erminois, thereon a cross crosslet fitchée also gu. betw. two buglehorns stringed az. Crest—A mount vert, thereon a greyhound’s head erased or, collared gu. betw. two thistles issuant ppr.
22) (Upper Grosvenor Street, London). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, on a mount vert a tree ppr. on a chief gu. a crescent betw. two mullets ar. all within a bordure gobony of the first and fourth; 2nd and 3rd, gu. three arrows lying fesseways in pale ar. the points towards the dexter. Crest—A demi lion.
23) (Rev. Joseph Hunter, F.S.A.). Or, a stag's head cabossed sa. on a chief indented of the second three crosses pattée of the first.
24) Or, a lion ramp. gu. an orle of crosses pattée fitchée sa.
25) Ar. three buglehorns in bend gu. stringed vert.
26) (Straidarran, co. Londonderry). Motto—Arte et marte. Ar. three buglehorns bendways gu. garnished and furnished vert. Crest—A stag’s head cabossed ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:hunting horn
10. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P400
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69