Huntington Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Huntington Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Huntington Coat of Arms Meaning

Huntington Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Huntingdon.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Huntington. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

huntington coat of arms

Huntington Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Huntington blazon are the fretty, mullet, lion rampant and buglehorn. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, sable and azure .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Fretty is a very pleasing patterning of the field whereby it is split into diamond shapes by overlapping and interwoven diagonal bands, where the background and the band colours may be any of the heraldic tinctures. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fret. The family CAVE, from Kent are blessed with the simple arms of Azure, fretty or. Ancient writers, such as Guillim believed that the pattern represented a net and hence symbolised those skilled in the art of “persuasion”! 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 15Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

Huntington Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Huntington Name

This long-established and distinguished name is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a locational surname acquiring from any one of the places called Huntington in Cheshire, Herefordshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire and Yorkshire, or from the division town of Huntingdon. More common variations are: Huntiington, Huintington, Huntinggton, Huntngton, Hunttington, Hunetington, Huntingdon, Hantington, Hyntington, Huntingotn.

The surname Huntington first appeared in Huntingdon in Huntingdonshire.  “This place, called by the Saxons Huntantun, and in the Norman survey Huntersdune, appears to have acquired its name from its situation in a tract of country which was anciently an extensive forest abounding with deer, and well suited for the chase.  The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that ofEustace de Huntendone, dated 1086, in the “Register of Old English Bynames”.  It was during the reign of King William 1, who was known as “The Conqueror” dated 1066-1087.  Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Individuals with the surname Huntington landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 17th, 18th, and 19th.    Some of the people with the name Huntington who arrived in the United States in the 17th-century included Christopher and Margaret Huntington, who settled in Boston in 1633 with their sons Simon and Thomas.  Simon Huntington, who landed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1633.  Lydia Huntington, who arrived in Virginia in 1642.  Lydia Huntington, who settled in Virginia in 1642.  Andrew Huntington, who arrived in Virginia in 1642.

People with the surname Huntington who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Thomas Huntington, who arrived in New York in 1785. Some of the people with the surname Huntington who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Edward Huntington, aged 45, who landed in New York in 1812.  Ellen Huntington, aged 19, who arrived in New York in 1862.  Joseph Huntington, aged 24, who landed in New York in 1862.

Huntington Family Gift Ideas

Browse Huntington family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More huntington Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Winchley Hall, co. Essex). Ar. fretty sa. on a chief gu. three mullets or.
2) Or, billettée a lion ramp. az. Crest—A crosier ar.
3) Gu. a fesse betw. three buglehorns ar.
4) Ar. fretty sa. on a chief of the second three mullets or.
5) (co. Devon). Erm. three water bougets in bend sa. betw. two cotises gu.
6) Ar. billettée a lion ramp. az.
7) Ar. three lions ramp. purp.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fret
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
15. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141