Hurley Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hurley Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Hurley Coat of Arms Meaning

Hurley Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Hurley. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

hurley coat of arms

Hurley Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Hurley blazon are the trefoil, crescent, fret and peacock. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, argent and sable .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The trefoil may originally been a representation of a specific plant (perhaps shamrock) but it has been used as a symbol almost since the beginning of heraldry and over time has adopted a stylised aspect. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil. Guillim believes that it signifies “perpetuity…the just man shall never wither”. 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

The fret is a striking charge, often occupying the whole of the field and being two instersecting diagonal lines interlaced with the outline of a square. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fret It is believed to be derived from the image of a fishing net, which it does indeed resemble, and hence Wade believes that it should signify persuasion, although other writers regard it separately as the “the heraldic true lovers knot” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P118

Hurley Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hurley Name

Hurley Origin:

England, Ireland

Origins of Name:

The surname of Hurley is derived from the pre 7th century Old English “hyrne”. Hyrne has two different translations, one is translated to “corner” or “bend” and another is translated to “leah” which means “a clearing.” Thus, the surname of Hurley, literally translates to mean a village or town that was built on a corner of cleared land. This surname was used to describe people who lived in this area—this village or town. In the medieval times, people began to migrate around, especially to look for work, and during this time, people were often identified by their place of birth. In the case of the Hurley surname, people adopted their village name as their surname to be better identified. In Ireland, this surname comes from the Gaelic personal name O’ Huirthile, and derives from the Irish “hurley” which translates to mean “a stick.”

Variations:

More common variations are:

Hurdley, Hurle, Hurly, Hurdle, Hourley, Haurley, Heurley, Hurleyiu, Hurliey, Hurlhey, Hurrley, Huruley, Hureley,

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the Hurley surname was John de Hurleia, who was noted in the Pipe Rolls of Worcestershire years of 1210 to 1211, under the reign of King John, who was also known as the “Lackland” and ruled from the year 1199 to the year 1216. In England, those with the surname of Hurley were originally found in the counties of Warwickshire and Berkshire. Since it’s original recorded inception, the surname of Hurley has spread to most of England and Wales. The highest concentrations for those with this surname are in the counties of Lancashire, Somerset, and the city of London. In Wales, there is a large number of people with the surname of Hurley in Glamorgan.

Ireland:

The first recorded presence of this name was found in Limerick found in Southwestern Ireland in Munster and spelled Herlihy. The surname of Hurley was attached to a family seat of Lords and Chiefs of Knockalong Castle in the parish and barony of Knockalong Costlea. The first recorded spelling of the surname of Hurley was found in Rath Hurly, which was a castle name in Kilcullane. Those with the surname of Hurley have settled in County Tipperary and County Cork.

Scotland:

In Scotland, those with the surname of Hurley are largely concentrated in the counties of Lanarkshire, Dunbartonshire, Midlothian and Angus.

United States:

Starting in the 17th Century, European citizens left their homeland in search of a new life. This movement, which was called the European Migration, often left citizens settling in the New World, which later came to be known as the United States of America. The first recorded settler to bear the surname of Hurley was Eliza Hurley, who landed in the state of Virginia in the year 1700. Forty-five years later, Daniel Hurley settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in the year 1745. Those who carry the surname of Hurley are more likely to be found in the states of New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Alabama, Tennessee, Ohio, and Kentucky. Hurley is the 897th most common name in the United States.

Australia and New Zealand:

In the 19th Century, settlers emigrated to both Australia and New Zealand to explore a new land. The first person to arrive in Australia with this surname was Honora Hurley, who sailed aboard the ship named the “Elgrin” in 1849. Alexander Hurley was the first person in New Zeland with this surname, and he arrived in 1840.

Hurley Today:

United States 47,498

England 8,238

Ireland 5,640

Australia 4,204

Canada 3,773

New Zealand 1,309

Wales 1,230

South Africa 767

Philippines 387

Germany 370

Notable People:

Francis Thomas Hurley (1927-2016) who was a prelate of the Roman Catholic Church, and served as the Archbishop of Anchorage from the year 1976 to 2001

Mr. Charles Edwin Hurley (died in 1915) who was a 3rd Class passenger from Brockton, Massachusetts who died in the sinking of the RMS Louisiana

Marcus Hurley (1883-1941) who was a four-time gold, and one-time bronze Olympic Medalist for cycling at the 1904 Olympic Games

Paul Hurley (born in 1946) who was a former American ice hockey player

Eric William Hurley (born in 1985) who is a professional baseball pitcher in America

Joseph Patrick Hurley (1894-1967) who was a prelate of the Roman Catholic Church

Major-General Patrick Jay Hurley (1883-1963) who was an American Ambassador to China from 1943 to 1945

Colonel Douglas G. Hurley (born in 1966) who was the pilot for the STS-127 Space Shuttle Mission, and is a NASA Astronaut with over 376 hours in space

Charles John Hurley (born in 1936) who was a former footballer from Ireland

Hurley Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hurley family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More hurley Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Ar. a crescent betw. three trefoils sa. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet a peacock ppr.
2) (Province of Munster, Reg. Ulster's Office). Ar. on a cross gu. five frets or.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fret
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P118