Husband Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Husband Family Coat of Arms

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Husband Coat of Arms Meaning

Husband Name Origin & History

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Husband Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Husband blazon are the mullet and martlet. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and argent.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 7A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Husband Name

Husband Origin:

England

Origins of Husband:

The origin of this unique and interesting name originally evolved from Anglo-Saxon, and is a professional surname for a farm expert, agriculturist, ultimately a village farmer. The name acquires from the former English pre 7th Century word ‘husbonda,’ from Old Norse ‘husbondi’, a combination of ‘hus’, which means domestic and ‘bonda’, which means stick or attach, a term which frequently introduces a man who was a head of his family. By the old Middle Ages, the word had changed into the Middle English word ‘husband,’ with a more speculate meaning of ‘farmer of the land, agriculturist.’ The new types of the surname are ‘husband’ and the nickname ‘Husbards’ and ‘Hosbons’, wich means ‘child of Husband’. The wedding of one Charles Husbands to Mary Cotton listed at St. Bride’s, Fleet Street, London, in the December in 1663.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hausband, Husaband, Husbandi, Husbando, Husbnd, Hasband, Hosband, Husbond, Husbend, Husbund.

England:

The origins of the surname Husband is found in Bedfordshire, situated in Southeast-central England, an old part of the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Mercia, where estates gave to them by Duke William for their help at Hastings in 1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Ernald Husebond, dated about 1176, in the Yorkshire Pipe Rolls. It was during the time of King Henry II who was known to be the “The Builders of Churches”, dated 1154 – 1189. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.

Ireland:

Many of the people with name Husband had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Husband settled in the United States in four different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Husband who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Thomas and Mary Husband landed in Virginia in 1635. Mary Husband and Tho Husband, both arrived in Virginia respectively in the years 1635 and 1649.

Some of the people with the surname Husband who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Henry Husband settled in Antigua in 1727, and Christopher Husband arrived in Mayland in 1731.

The following century saw many more Husband surnames come. Some of the people with the surname Husband who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Thomas Blair Husband landed in New York in 1855. John Husband came to America in 1895, and Alfred Husband arrived in America from Cornwall in 1892.

Some of the people with the surname Husband who settled in the United States in the 20th century included Kate C. Husband landed in America in 1907. James Husband at the age of 27 laded in America from Glasgow in 1906. Dorothy Husband and Henry Husband, both arrived in America from Tywardrath, England in the same year in 1906.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Husband who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Aubrey Husband at the age of 34 arrived in Belmont, Canada in 1909.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Husband who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Peter Husband at the age of 20 landed in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Nile.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Husband who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included J. H. Husband at the age of 40, arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship “Apelles” in the year 1874. Eliza Husband who was a laborer at the age of 25 arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Arwa” in the year 1884.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Husband: United States 6,058; England 6,733; Australia 1,985; Ireland 835; Canada 9,943; South Africa 1,918; Scotland 263; Wales 282; Germany 336; New-Zealand 471.

Notable People:

Jackie Husband (1918–1992), was a Scottish football player and director.

James Husband (footballer) (born 1994), is an English football player.

Jimmy Husband (born 1947), is an English retired football player.

Les Husband (1898–1970), was an Australian rules player in football.

Rick Husband (1957–2003), was an American pilot.

Ron Husband (born 1950), is an American painter.

Stephen Husband (born 1990), is a Scottish player in football.

Tom Husband (born 1936), is a Scottish engineer and scholar.

Husband Family Gift Ideas

Browse Husband family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Gesley). Argent on a fesse voided azure between three martlets sable as many mullets gules fimbriated of the second.
2) Argent on a fesse cotised between three martlets gules as many mullets of the field.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
7. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79