Huxley Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Huxley Family Coat of Arms

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Huxley Coat of Arms Meaning

Huxley Name Origin & History

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Huxley Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Huxley blazon are the crescent, bend and serpent. The two main tinctures (colors) are ermine and gules.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 13Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The serpent Is a typical example of a mythical creature, as real to a person of the middle ages as dogs, cats and elephants are to us today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Huxley Name

Huxley Origin:

England

Origins of Huxley:

This unusual surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is geographical from a place in Cheshire called Huxley, noted variably as “Huxeleg” (1260), “Huxley” (1271), and “Huxelegh” (1385), the name is considered to acquire from the genitive case of the Olde English pre 7th Century particular nickname “Hucc” (from “hux”, which means a ridicule or insult), and “-leah”, which means a wood or clearing. Geographical Surnames were usually derived by a local landholder, or by the king of the castle, and particularly by those old residents of a place who had shifted to another area, and were there best recognized by the name of their mother town. The surname from this origin was first noted in the second half of the 13th Century. One Thomas de Huxeley shows in the Premium Rolls of Staffordshire, dated 1332, and a William Huxley listed in the 1530 Fine Court Rolls of Essex. A famous named ancestor was Thomas Henry Huxley (1825 – 1895), a modern of Darwin who studied at Charing Cross Hospital and became deputy surgeon on H.M.S. “Rattlesnake” 1846 – 1850. He announced many scientific papers on fossil forms, vertebrate animals, natural history, and many other subjects.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hauxley, Huxeley, Huxly, Huxle, Hoxley, Hexley, Hixley, Huxluy, Heaxley.

England:

The surname Huxley first appeared in Cheshire where they held a family seat from old times as Kings of the Castle of Huxley. The main stem of this old family, however, lost most of the lands when, in about 1330, Alice, daughter of John Huxley of Huxley married John de Birkenhead, an inheritress who carried with her most of the family lands.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Robert de Huxeleg, dated about 1260, in the “Assize Court Rolls of Cheshire,” Huntingdonshire. It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with name Huxley had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Huxley landed in the United States in four different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th. Some of the people with the name Huxley who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Leversedge Huxley came to Nevis in 1670.

Individuals with the surname Huxley who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Mary Huxley, and her husband arrived in New England in 1753.

People with the surname Huxley who landed in the United States in the 19th century included Thomas Huxley arrived in New York in 1880.

The following century saw more Huxley surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Huxley who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included James Huxley at the age of 31, who landed in America from Manchester, England, in 1908. Frank Huxley, at the age of 24, who settled in America from Stafford, England, in 1909. Frank Huxley at the age of 24, who shifted to the United States from Wallington, England, in 1911. Ethelinda Huxley at the age of 4, who moved to the United States from Croydon, England, in 1911. Alice M. Huxley at the age of 39, who moved to America, in 1911.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Huxley: England 2,533; Australia 1,318; United States 868; Canada 364; Wales 226; Argentina 134; South Africa 110; France 98; Brazil 95; Northern Ireland 72

Notable People:

David Huxley was born in February 1988. He is an Australian ice hockey player currently playing for the Adelaide Adrenaline in the Australian Ice Hockey League.

Jonathan Huxley was born in the year 1965. He is a British artist whose pictures and paintings draw visions of human figures in motion.

Julian Huxley was born in August 1979 in Sydney.

Martin Huxley was a British mathematician.

Huxley Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Huxley, co. Chester). Erm. on a bend cotised gu. three crescents or. Crest—A snake ppr.
2) (Edmonton, co. Middlesex). Same Arms. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi lion ramp. erm. collared of the first, holding betw. the paws a crescent of the last.
3) Erm. on a bend cotised gu. three crescents ar. Crest—A wolf's head erased sa. gorged with a collar or, charged with three crescents gu. Motto—In Deo omnia.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49
13. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164