Hyde Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hyde Family Coat of Arms

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Hyde Coat of Arms Meaning

Hyde Name Origin & History

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Hyde Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hyde blazon are the lozenge, chevron and mullet. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and gules .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the lozenge Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. It can appear on its own, voided (with the background visible through the middle), and can also be conjoined, whereby adjacent lozenges touch point-to-point. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lozenge Guillim groups the lozenge with all square shapes as being symbolic of “verity, probity, constancy and equity”. 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P262

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.13The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 16A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hyde Name

Hyde Origin:

England

Origins of Hyde:

The surname of Hyde has two possible origins. The first of the possible origins of the surname of Hyde is that it was a topographical surname for someone who was a “holder of the hide,” which described someone who lived on a farm, which was originally called a “hide of land.” A topographical surname is used to describe someone who lived on or near a residential landmark. This landmark could be either man made or natural, and would have been easily identifiable in the area from which it hailed, thus making the people who lived near it easily distinguished. In the case of the surname of Hyde, this surname derives from the Old English Pre 7th Century word of “hid” or “higid” which can be translated to mean “land.” The amount of a hide of land could vary from sixty acres to one hundred and twenty acres of land, and was said to be able to sustain a single “higan” which can be translated to mean “household.” Another possible origin of the surname of Hyde is that it was a variation of the female personal given name of Ida. In the early 11th century, names that began with a vowel often added an “h” at the beginning.

Variations:

More common variations are: Heyde, Hide, Hayde, Hoyde, Hydie, Hydue, Hydee, Hyede, Huyde, Hyade, Hydei

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Hyde can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Robert de la Hyda was mentioned in the Pipe Rolls of Dorset in the year of 1188. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Henry II of England, who was also known throughout the ages as one “The Builder of Churches.” King Henry II of England ruled from he year 1154 to the year 1189. Other mentions of the surname of Hyde in the country of England include one Edward Hyde, who was the first earl of Clarendon, and went on to become secretary of state, lord chancellor, and Chief Advisor to Charles II at the Restoration. Another mention of the surname of Hyde was one Avice ate Hyde, who was mentioned in the Subsidy Rolls of Sussex in the year of 1296. Those who bear the surname of Hyde within the country of England can be found in large concentrations throughout the country. The areas with the largest number of those who bear the surname of Hyde are within the counties of Lancashire, Derbyshire, Yorkshire, Cheshire, Warwickshire, Staffordshire, Essex, Hampshire, Surrey, and the areas in and around the city of London.

Scotland:

Those who carry the surname of Hyde within the country of Scotland can be found in high concentrations within the areas of Midlothian, Angus, Lanarkshire, and Renfrewshire.

United States of America:

Within the United States of America, there are many people who bear the surname of Hyde. The United States has the largest population of those who bear this surname of Hyde in the world. The areas where those who bear this surname are found include Ohio, Vermont, Connecticut, New York, Massachusetts, and New Jersey.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hyde: United States 34,703; England 13,621; Australia 5,177; Canada 3,031; Ghana 2,956; South Africa 2,064; Honduras 1,406; New Zealand 1,288; Vietnam 1,192; Jamaica 1,107

Notable People:

R. Bruce Hyde (1941-2015) who was an actor and educator from America, and who served as Professor Emeritus of Communication Studies at St. Cloud University, who was also most notably recognized for his portrayal of Lt. Kevin Riley in the original Star Trek series

Walter Lewis Hyde (1919-2003) who was a physicist, and a pioneer in the fiber optics field, and who hailed from America

Edward Hyde (1650-1712) who served as the Governor of the state of North Carolina from the year 1711 to the year 1712, and who was a politician from America

Miriam Hyde (1913-2005) who was a pianist, composer, music educator, and poet who was awarded the Order of the British Empire in the year of 1981, and who hailed from the country of Australia

Doctor Douglas Hyde (1860-1949) who was an Anglo-Irish scholar, who studied the Irish language, and who served as the first President of Ireland from the year 1938 to the year 1945

Vicki Hyde (born in 1962) who was a science writer and editor from the country of New Zealand, and who served as the Chair-Entity of the New Zealand Skeptics

Hyde Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hyde family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Hydon, co. Dorset). Or, a chev. betw. three lozenges az. on a chief gu. a saltire engr. betw. two birds of the field. Crest—A cock’s head erased az. crested and jelloped gu. bezantée, in the mouth a pansy flower of the last.
2) (Denton, co. Lancaster. Visit. 1567). Ar. three lozenges sa. Crest—An eagle’s head erased or, beaked sa.
3) (Ormston, co. Lancaster, 1567; descended from Hyde, of Norbury, co. Chester). Az. a chev. betw. three lozenges or, in fesse point a crescent. Crest—A raven or crow rising.
4) (London; Reg. Her. Office, London). Az. a saltire or, betw. four bezants, a chief erm. Crest—A unicorn's head erased ar. armed and maned or, collared vair.
5) (Henry Elwin Hyde, Esq., J.P., East Dereham, co. Norfolk). Gu. two chevronels ar. on the upper one a mullet of the first. Crest—A stag’s head erased gu.
6) (co. Nottingham). Gu. a saltire or, betw. four bezants, a chief erm. Crest—A unicorn’s head gorged with a collar componée.
7) Gu. on a saltire engr. or, five torteaux, a chief erm.
8) Az. a chev. betw. three lozenges or, on a canton gu. a lion ramp. betw. two crosses crosslet fitchee of the second.
9) Ar. a chev. betw. two mullets in chief and a cinquefoil in base gu.
10) (co. Norfolk). Or, a chev. betw. three lozenges az. on a chief gu. a saltire engr. betw. two martlets fessways of the first. Crest—A cock’s head erased az. combed purp. on the neck a lozenge or, betw. four bezants, in the beak a pansy flower ppr. stalked and leaved vert.
11) (Hyde, co. Bedford and co. Dorset; arms confirmed by Cooke, Clarenceux, 1571). Az. a chev. betw. three lozenges or. Crest—A raven volant sa. mantled gu. doubled ar.
12) (South Denchworth and Kingston Lisle, co. Berks; an ancient and distinguished family, of which was Sir George Hyde, of Kingston Lisle, Knight of the Bath, temp. James I., whom a pedigree, Harl. MSS. 1535, states to have been sixth in descent from the first of the family who settled at Denchworth). Gu. two chevronels ar. Crest—A lion's head erased sa. bezantée.
13) (Pangborne, co. Berks). Same Arms as Hyde, of South Denchworth. Crests—1st: A spear ppr. with a pennon gu.; 2nd, as Hyde, of South Denchworth.
14) (Romsey, co. Hants; descended from Hyde, of Denchworth. Visit. Hants, 1634). Gu. two chev. ar. on the upper a fleur-de-lis az.
15) (Norbury and Hyde, co. Chester). Az. a chev. betw. three lozenges or. Crest—An eagle, wings endorsed sa. beaked and membered or.
16) (Ireland; Fun. Ent. 1656). Same Arms, on each lozenge a fleur-de-lis gu. a crescent for diff.
17) (Castle Hyde, now of Creg, co. Cork; allowed by Betham, then Deputy Ulster, to John Hyde, Esq., Esquire to the Earl of Shannon, at his installation as a Knight of St. Patrick, 29 June, 1809). Gu. two chevronels ar. the upper one charged with an erm. spot. Crest—A leopard's head erased sa. bezantée. Motto—De vivis nil nisi verum.
18) (Reg. Ulster’s Office). Purp. a chev. betw. three lions pass. or.
19) (London). Per pale or and az. on a chev. engr. betw. three lozenges all counterchanged, on the dexter side as many guttees d'eau, and in the sinister three erm. spots. Crest—Seven arrows, six in saltire and one in pale, az. feathered and headed ar. entiled with an Eastern coronet or.
20) (St. Katharine’s, co. Middlesex; confirmed 5 Aug. 1637). Az. on a chev. betw. three lozenges or, as many fleurs-de-lis gu.
21) (Whetstone, co. Middlesex; granted 1691). Erm. an eagle displ. ermines, debruised with a chev. engr. or, charged with three lozenges az. Crest—A demi eagle displ. and erased az. gorged with a collar ar. charged with three lozenges or.
22) (co. Stafford). Sa. a fesse betw. six martlets ar.
23) (co. Stafford). Or, a chev. gu. betw. three mullets pierced az.
24) Az. a chev. betw. three lions ramp. ar. (another, or).
25) (Stoke Bliss, co. Hereford; Har. MSS. 1043). Ar. on a chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis sa. as many crescents of the field.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lozenge
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P262
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
13. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
16. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105