Ince Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Ince Family Coat of Arms

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Ince Coat of Arms Meaning

Ince Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Inch.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Ince. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Ince Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Ince blazon are the torteaux, bend and oak tree. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, gules and sable .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146 One of the simplest such shapes is the plain circle, known to heralds as the roundle. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle So popular is this charge that a shorthand has arisen for roundles of a particular colour and torteau is a roundle gules, or red. (We must be careful however not to confuse this with the word in French heraldry, in which torteau means roundle and must have the colour specified.) Most authorities agree that the English usage signifies the “Manchet cake” or communion wafer and thus is a symbol of religious allegiance.

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

Amongst the natural objects depicted on a coat of arms, trees feature frequently, either in whole or as individual branches and leaves. 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407. Although sometimes described simply as a tree most often the specific species was named, and the oak tree or oak leaf is a typical example that frequently is depicted in arms, sometimes fructed with acorns of a different colour. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Oak For good reason, Wade assigns the meaning of “antiquity and strength” to this symbol. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P126

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Ince Name

Ince Origin:

England, Ireland

Origins of Ince:

This interesting name is geographical from places so called in Cheshire and Lancashire. It derives from the Welsh “ynys,” which means an island, water pasture, and the name is very suitable for Ince in Cheshire which forms with Elton an island in the low-lying country on the Mersey. The spelling, listed in the Domesday Book of 1086, is Inise, evolving through Ines and Ynes to its new form. Among the Middle Ages, when many people departed from their homes in search of work, they picked the names of their old hamlet as a source of recognition. Two previous recordings of the name in Cheshire are of one Anne Ince who named at Nantwich in the April 1579 and one William Ince who married Jane Maddock in June 1583 also at Nantwich.

Variations:

More common variations are: Inceu, Ionce, Inace, Inceh, Yince, Iance, Incee, Aince, Inice, Insce.

England:

The surname Ince first appeared in Cheshire at Ince, a hamlet and local church in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and historically in the union of Great Boughton, Second county of the hundreds of Eddisbury. The first register of this local appeared in the Domesday Book of 1086 when it was noted as Inise. Ince-in-Makerfield or Ince is a recreated township in the Metropolitan Borough of Wigan, in Greater Manchester, but historically in Lancashire. The oldest mention of the Palace of Ince and the Ince family is sometimes from about 1202 in this area.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John de Ince, dated about 1401, in the “Assize Rolls, Lancashire.” It was during the time of King Henry IV who was known to be the “Henry of Bolingbroke,” dated 1399-1413. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Ince had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the surname Ince who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Gabriel and Jonathon Ince, both settled in New Haven Conn. in the same year 1630. Jonathan Ince, who landed in New England in 1650. John Ince, who arrived in Virginia in 1652. Thomas Ince settled in Virginia in 1654. William Ince, who landed in Virginia in 1664.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Ince: Turkey 75,114; England 3,210; United States 2,874; Germany 1,715; South Africa 1,005; Australia 518; Canada 503; Netherlands 252; Barbados 248; Indonesia 241.

Notable People:

Ada Ince (1913-1975), was an American film actress.

Basil Ince (born 1933), is a Trinidadian racer.

Clayton Ince is a Trinidadian football player.

Deniz İnce (born 1974), is a Turkish ice hockey referee and an old player.

Edward Lindsay Ince (1891-1941), was an English mathematician.

Sir Godfrey Ince is a British civil servant.

Harry Ince (1893-1978), was a Barbadian, cricket player.

Henry Ince (1736-1808), was a British Army officer.

Henry Bret Ince (1830-1889), was a British businessperson, author, and leader.

Izzet Ince (born 1981), is a Turkish bodybuilder.

James Ince (born c. 1969), is an American NASCAR crew chief.

John F. Ince was an American writer and business researcher.

John Ince (politician), is a Canadian leader.

John Ince (footballer) (1908 – after 1934), was an English football player.

John Ince (missionary), was an early British Protestant officer.

Joseph Murray Ince (1806-1859), was a Welsh painter.

Kaan Ince (1970-1992), was a Turkish author and poet.

Kamran Ince is a Turkish-American writer.

Paul Ince is an English footballer.

Robin Ince is an English entertainer.

Ralph Ince (1887-1937), was an American film actor and manager.

Rohan Ince was an English footballer.

Sabit İnce (born 1934), is a Turkish poet.

Ince Family Gift Ideas

Browse Ince family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Ince, co. Lancaster). Ar. three torteaux in bend betw. two cotises sa. Crest—On a mount vert a horse sejant against an oak tree ppr.
2) (city of Chester, 1613). Same Arms, a fleur-de-lis or, on a mullet of the second for diff. Crest—A tree fruited or.
3) (co. Lincoln). Ar. three torteaux in bend betw. two bendlets sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Oak
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P126