Jobson Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Jobson Family Coat of Arms

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Jobson Coat of Arms Meaning

Jobson Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Jobson. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.
jobson coat of arms

Jobson Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Jobson blazon are the eagle, paly, escallop and chevron. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and ermine .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

Play is what is known as a treatment, a regular patterning, usually over the whole background of the shield. The word comes from the pale, the major vertical stripe that appears on some shields, paly is obvious its little cousin, consisting of, typically, 6 or more vertical stripes, alternately coloured 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Paly. The stripes can be any combination of the heraldic tinctures, an early example is that of GURNEY, being simply paly of six, or and argent. Paly can be combined with other effects, such as decorative edges on each stripe, or overlaid with other treatments such as bendy, and these can be very effective and pleasing to the eye 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P121.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Jobson Name

Jobson Origin:

England

Origins of Jobson:

This interesting name is the surname form of the name “Job,” which has four possible origins. The first origin acquires from the Hebrew particular name “Iyor” or “Job,” which means “persecuted one,” which was produced by the biblical character who is the main part of the “Book of Job.” From this came the nickname “Job,” used as a ” terrible beast” or possibly one irritated with steam, as Job was. The Old French “job” or “joppe,” was also a nickname for a “sorry sufferer,” perhaps in a shifted sense of the biblical figure. The third possible origin is from the Middle English “jubbe” or “jobbe,” which means a large container including four gallons, where the surname would be a metonymic professional name for a cooper. Finally, the name may acquire from the Old French “jube,” which means a long woolen cloth and have given to a producer or retailer of these garments.

Variations:

More common variations are: Johbson, Joabson, Jaobson, Jobison, jopson, Jebson, Jibson, Jubson, Jabson, Jobsen.

England:

The surname Jobson first appeared in Norfolk where they held a family seat from old times, some say well before the Norman invasion and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Ralph Jopson, dated about 1382, in the “Records of the Abbey of Whitby,” Yorkshire. It was during the time of King Richard II who was known to be the “Richard of Bordeaux,” dated 1377 – 1399. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Jobson had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Jobson landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Jobson who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included John Jobson, who came to Virginia in 1665. Francis Jobson settled in Barbados in 1671. Frances Jobson, who landed in Maryland or Virginia in 1671. Samuel Jobson, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1682.

People with the surname Jobson who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Michael J Jobson, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1708.

The following century saw more Jobson surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Jobson who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Nancy Jobson landed in Barnstable, Massachusetts in 1822. Nancy and Margaret Jobson, both arrived in Barstable Massachusetts in the same year 1822 with two children. Margaret Jobson at the age of 28, landed in Barnstable, Massachusetts in 1822. Charles Jobson, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Jobson who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Mary Jobson arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Gipsy Queen” in 1850. Charles Jobson at the age of 24 arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Caroline.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Jobson: England 2,103; United States 1,327; Australia 1,175; Brazil 922; South Africa 347; Canada 300; Jamaica 268; New Zealand 156; Germany 134; Scotland 118

Notable People:

Alexander Jobson (1875–1933), was an Australian Army Brigadier General.

Eddie Jobson (born 1955), is an English singer.

Edward Jobson (1855–1909), was an English cricket player.

Frederick James Jobson (1812–1881), was an artist, designer, and Wesleyan Methodist administrator.

Gary Jobson was an Australian world-class marine.

Jóbson Leandro Pereira de Oliveira (born 1988), is a Brazilian football player.

Liesl Jobson is a South African poet, and singer.

Marci Jobson (born 1975), is an American soccer player.

Matt Jobson (born 1980), is an Australian rugby league player.

Richard Jobson was a seventeenth-century English scientist.

Richard Jobson (footballer) (born 1963), is an English football player.

Wayne Jobson (born 1954), is a Jamaican record producer.

Jobson Family Gift Ideas

Browse Jobson family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Ilford, co. Essex; granted temp. Edward VI.). Paly of six ar. and az. a chev. erm. betw. three eagles displ. or, armed gu.
2) (Snayth, co. York). Gu. five escallops in cross (another, in saltire). Crest—On a hand extended ar. a falcon close or.
3) Per pale az. and or, an eagle displ. counterchanged, on a chief gu. three escallops ar.
4) (Windsor, co. Berks, temp. Queen Elizabeth). Az. three leopards' faces or.
5) (London: Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1625, Katherine Jobson, to. first, Capt. Henry Malby, co. Roscommon; and second, Sir Ralph Sydley, Knt.). Paly of six ar. and az. a chev. erm. betw. three eagles displ. or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Paly
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P121
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91