Jones Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Jones Family Coat of Arms

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Jones Coat of Arms Meaning

Jones Name Origin & History

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Jones Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Jones blazon are the pheon, griffin, fleur-de-lis and lion. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, azure and or .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The pheon is a specific type of arrow head with barbs and darts and hence quite distinctive in appearance. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon Like the other symbols related to arrows, Wade suggests the symbolism is that of “readiness for military service”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]14Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 17A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Jones Name

Jones Origin: England, Wales

Origins of Name:

The surname of Jones was found largely throughout the British Isles, and is the most commonly found surname in Wales. Originally, the surname of Jones is of a medieval English origin and comes from the given personal name of John, or Joan, which is the female version of this name. Both of these names were introduced following the Norman Invasion of 1066, and were recorded as “Jon” or “Jone” and there was no determining factor between the male and female spellings of this given name. This name originally derives from the Hebrew given name of “Yochanan” which can be translated to mean “Jehovah has favored (me with a son).” The surname of Jones derived from the patronymic form of the given name of John, meaning son of John.

Variations:

More common variations are: Joynes, Joines, Johnes, Joanes, Jonnes, Joness, Jeones, Joones, Jhones, Jonesy

History:

Ireland: In the country of Ireland, the surname of Jones is first recorded following the Anglo-Norman Invasion in the year 1170. The surname of Jones has been Gaelicized as one “MacSeoin.”

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Jones was found in the country of England in the year of 1273. One person by the name of Matilda Jones was mentioned in the Hundred Rolls of Huntingdonshire. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Edward 1st, who was known as, and commonly referred to throughout history as “The Hammer of the Scots” and ruled from the year 1272 to the year 1307. The surname of Jones is one of the more commonly found surnames throughout the country of England. The surname of Jones is said to be the second most common surname in the country of England. Those who reside in the country of England and bear the surname of Jones can be found throughout the entire country, but are more commonly found in the areas of Chester, Yorkshire, and County Hunts.

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th Century, European settlers became more and more displeased with the state of their countries. They felt that the governments were overreaching, and that the living conditions, job availability, and the capability to acquire land was waning. Thus, these people decided to migrate to The United States of America, which at that time was commonly referred to as The New World, or The Colonies. This New World promised settlers a freedom from religious persecution, the ability to buy expanses of land, new jobs, and better living conditions for everyone who moved here. Among those who came to The Colonies were those who bore the surname of Jones. The first person in The United States of America who carried the surname of Jones was one Chadwallader Jones, who arrived in the state of Virginia in the year 1623. Shortly after him, in the year of 1631, Alexander Jones landed in New England, and Alice Jones settled in Boston, Massachusetts in the year 1631.

Canada:

In the 18th Century, it became popular to move North and settle in Canada. The first person who moved from The United States to the country of Canada who bore the surname of Jones was one Mr. Ebenezer Jones (born in the year 1920) who moved from New York to Home District, Saltfleet Township, in the province named Ontario in the year 1780.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Jones: United States 1,455,165; England 262,805; Australia 95,808; Wales 86,331; Nigeria 74,736; Canada 62,958; South Africa 58,554; Sierra Leone 21,398; Ghana 15,656; Brazil 14,659

Notable People:

Susannah Mushatt Jones (1899-2016) who was a supercentenarian from America, and who was the oldest living person in the world and the last American from the 1800’s, she passed at 116 years and 311 days old

Isham Russell “Rusty” Jones II 91942-2015) who was a jazz drummer from America

Erika Clark Jones, who was a politician from America, who served as a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of Ohio in the year 2008

Dean Carroll Jones (1931-2015) who was an actor from America, and starred in the Disney Movies The Love Bug, The Ugly Dachshund, Blackbeard’s Ghost, and Snowball Express

C. Fred Jones (1930-2015) who was a Member of the Florida House of Representatives from the yeat 1970 to the year 1992, and who was a politician from America

Mr. Evan Jones (died in 1915) who was a 3rd Class passenger from Chicago, Illinois who died in the sinking of the RMS Lusitania

Louis Marshall “Grandpa” Jones (1913-1998) who was a musician from America, a banjo player and was called an “old time” country and gospel singer who was most notably recognized for his work on Hew Haw and his induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame

Jones Family Gift Ideas

Browse Jones family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Viscount Ranclagh). Motto—Coelitus mihi vires. Az. a cross betw. four pheons, points downwards, or. Crest—A dexter arm embowed in armour, the hand in a gauntlet ppr. grasping a dart or. Supporters—Two griffins erminois.
2) (Earl of Ranelagh; extinct 1711; Richard, third Viscount Ranelagh, was so created 1674, d. s. p. m.). Motto—Coelitus mihl vires. Az. on a cross betw. four pheons or, five mullets gu. Crest—A dexter arm embowed in armour, holding a dart all ppr. Supporters—Two griffins per fesse vert and or.
3) (Boultibrook, co. Hereford, bart., extinct). Motto—Vens pascit corvos. Ar. a chev. betw. three crows sa. in chief a star of the Order of the Crescent. Crest—A crow sa. holding in the dexter claw the star of the Order of the Crescent.
4) (Foy, co. Hereford; descended from Rev. William Jones, m. Elizabeth, second dau. and co-heir of Rev. George Abrahall, of Foye, about 1690). Erm. a bend sinister gu. over all a lion ramp. or. Crest—A hedgehog pass. ppr.
5) (Stanley Hall, co. Salop, bart.). Motto—Esto sol testis. See Tyrwhitt, Bart. Quarterly, 1st and 4th. ar. a lion ramp. vert, vulned in the mouth ppr., for Jones; 2nd and 3rd, gu. three lapwings (or peewits) or, for Tyrwhitt. Crest—1st, Jones: The sun in splendour, each ray inflamed or; 2nd, Tyrwhitt: A savage ppr. wreathed and cinctured vert, in the dexter hand a club ppr.
6) (Cranmer Hall, co. Norfolk, bart.). Motto—Marte et arte. Az. on a fesse or, three grenades fired ppr. in chief a castle, and in base a lion couchant ar. Crest—In front of a castle ar. a lion couchant or.
7) (Littlington, co. Bedford). Az. a cross betw. four pheons or. Crest—On a chapeau az. turned up or, an armed arm embowed, tasselled gu. holding in the hand ppr. a spear, staff of the fourth, armed of the second.
8) (Glan Helen, co. Carnarvon). Motto—Integritate et fortitudine. Sa. on a chev. betw. three spearheads ar. two staves of Æsculapius chevronwise, each entwined by a serpent ppr. Crest—A dexter arm embowed in armour ppr. garnished or, surmounted by two branches of laurel in saltire vert, the hand grasping a javelin in bend sinister, point downwards of the first, from the wrist pendent by a ribbon an escutcheon gu. charged with a scymitar also ppr. pommel and hilt gold.
9) (Caton, co. Lancaster). Motto—Vince malum bono. Quarterly, 1st, erm. a chev. couped sa., for Johnes, or Jones; 2nd, sa. on a bend or, betw. two shacklebolts ar. three pheons gu., for Johnson, of Twyzell, co. Durham; so blazoned in the Visit, of Durham, A.D. 1664; in some authorities, for the shacklebolts two turrets are substituted; 3rd, quarterly, or and gu. on a bend ea. three escallops ar., for Eure, or Evers; 4th, az. a bend or, for Scrope. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a plume of feathers az.
10) (Chiswick, co. Middlesex; John Jones, son of Thomas Jones, of same place. Visit. Middlesex, 1663). Or, five fusils in fess sa. each charged with a fleur-de-lis ar. Crest—A lion's head erased sa. collared or, studded gu.
11) (Stratford, Bow, co. Middlesex; John Jones, gent., grandson of John Jones, of Bristol, co. Devon. Visit. Middlesex, 1663). Or, on a mount vert a lion ramp. az. Crest—A wolf's head erased or.
12) (Buckland, co. Brecon). Vert a chev. betw. three wolves' heads or.
13) (Sunningwell, co. Berks, Chastleton, co. Oxford, and co. Worcester). Gu. a lion ramp. and a bordure indented or. Crest—A demi lion ramp. or, holding betw. the paws a mullet gu.
14) (co. Salop, and London; granted Nov. 1610). Az. a lion pass. betw. three, crosses formée fitchée or, a chief of the last.
15) (co. Berks). Same Arms. Crest—A lion ramp. or, grasping an anchor in pale sa.
16) (Tredustan, co. Brecon). Ar. a stag trippant, with wings attached to the buttocks and hind legs ppr. betw. the attires a rose or.
17) (co. Brecknock). Sa. a fesse embattled erm. betw. three boars’ heads couped or. Crest—A boar's head erect and erased or.
18) (co. Carmarthen). Ar. three bulls’ heads cabossed sa.
19) (Abermarles, co. Carmarthen, bart., extinct; descended from John ap Thomas, of Abermarles, sixth son of Thomas ap Griffifth ap Nicholas whose elder son, Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K.G., was ancestor of Lord Dynevor. Elizabeth dau. and heir of Sir Henry Jones, Bart, of Abermarles, m. Sir Francis Cornwallis, Knt.). Ar. on a cross ragulée az. betw. four pheons gu. five bezants.
20) (Robert Jones, Esq., of Hafod, co. Flint, whose dau. Syndey, m. Captain Edward Pierse, co. Meath; Fun. Ent. Ulster's Office, 1655). Ar. a crescent gu. betw. three boars' heads sa. langued and couped of the second, a border engr. of the third
21) (Samuel Thomas Jones, Esq., of Glanmere House, Forest Hill, co. Kent). Motto—Ex vero decus. Az. a stag statant ar. betw. three roses of the last barbed and seeded ppr. Crest—Upon a mount betw. two roses ar. slipped ppr. a stag lodged also ppr. collared az.
22) (Castle March). Ar. a chev. az. betw. three nags’ beads erased sa.
23) (Penrose, co. Cornwall, and co. Wilts). Chequy or and sa. on a fesse gu. three leopards' faces jessant-de-lis of the first. Crest—A dragon's head erased vert.
24) (co. Denbigh). Ar. a lion ramp. vert, vulned on the shoulder gu. Crest—The sun ppr. at the end of each ray a flame of fire of the first.
25) (Grothkenan, co. Denbigh; of this line was Inigo Jones, the architect). Per bend sinister erm. and ermines a lion ramp. within a bordure engr. or. Crest—A lion's head erased per pale ar. and sa.
26) (Archdeacon of Hereford, d. 1823). Per bend sinister erm. and ermines, a lion ramp. or, within a bordure engr. per bend sinister ar. and sa. Crest—A lion ramp. or.
27) (co. Hereford, and Rowe, co. Middlesex). Or, on a mount vert a lion ramp. az. Crest—A tiger’s head erased or.
28) (The Bower Park, co. Worcester. Visit. 1683). (Lanvayre, co. Denbigh). Gu. a cross crosslet on three grieces or.
29) (Edvin Loach, co. Worcester. Visit. 1683). Or, a lion ramp. and a border sa.
30) (Lulsley, co. Worcester). Gu. a lion ramp. betw. six trefoils slipped ar. a border of the last.
31) (Worcester; granted 1602, by Dethick, Garter, to Walter Jones, of the city of Worcester, son of John Jones, the second son of John Jones, of Greysmund, co. Monmouth, “with ye consent of ye Rt. Honble Gilbert, Earl of Shrewsbury, who beareth ye same arms). Gu. a lion ramp. and a border engr. or. Crest—A demi lion ramp. or, holding betw. the forepaws a mullet gu.
32) (Abberley, co. Worcester). Motto—Deo adjuvante. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. on a cross raguly ar. betw. in the 1st and 4th quarters a pheon, and in the 2nd and 3rd a cross moline or, five mullets gu., for Jones; 2nd and 3rd, ea. three bars ar., for Lees. Crest—A stag lodged and reguard. ppr. semee of acorns vert, in the mouth a fern branch also ppr.
33) (Wateringbury Place, co. Kent). Gu. three lions ramp, or, on a chief of the second a fret of the first. Crest—A talbot’s head couped ar. chained round the neck or.
34) (Barrow and Filmingham, co. Lincoln). Or, a chev. engr. betw. three Cornish choughs sa. Crest—A cubit arm erect, vested purp. cuffed ar. holding in the hand ppr. a branch of marigolds also ppr. stalked and leaved vert.
35) (Lord Mayor of London, 1620). Az. a lion pass. guard. betw. three crosses crosslet fitchee or, a chief of the last.
36) (London; granted Sept. 1604). Az. on a cross or, betw. four pheons of the second five estoilea gu. Crest—An arm in pale vested or, thereon three estoiles in pale gu. in the hand ppr. a pheon erect ar.
37) (Marshal of the King’s Bench, London). Erm. on a bend az. a rose betw. two annulets or, in chief a sword in pale ppr. hilt and pommel gold, crossed by another, the hilt towards the dexter side of the escutcheon. Crest—A demi lion ramp. ppr.
38) (London). Per pale az. and gu. three lions ramp. ar. a mullet for diff. Crest—A buck’s head erased sa. attired or, holding betw. the horns a buglehorn of the first.
39) (London). Sa. a fesse ar. betw. two daggers, one in chief erect, and one in base pendent of the second, hilts and pommels or. Crest—A gauntlet barways or, holding a sword erect ar. hilt of the first, pierced through a boar's head erased vert.
40) (London). Or, a lion ramp. az. charged on the shoulder with a bezant, in chief two martlets sa.
41) (co. Merioneth). (Dol-yn-Edeirnion, co. Merioneth; derived from Jestyn ap Gwrgant Lord of Glamorgan, whose last descendant in the direct male line, seated at Llanrhaiadr Dyffryn Clwyd, d. in the beginning of the 17th century, and was buried in the parish church, where there is a monument to his memory). Or, a lion ramp. within a bordure az. Crest—A lion ramp. az. holding a shield or, within a carved bordure (another, the shield az.).
42) (Chiswick, co. Middlesex). Az. three nags’ heads erased ar. a canton of the last.
43) (Ratcliffe, co. Middlesex). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three crows ppr. a bordure of the second charged with eight bezants.
44) (co. Monmouth). Ar. on a chev. betw. three birds sa. a lion's head erased betw. two trefoils slipped or, a bordure of the second plattee.
45) (co. Monmouth). Sa. a stag standing at gaze ar. attired and unguled or. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a stag ar. attired vert.
46) (co. Monmouth). Sa. a spearhead betw. three scaling ladders ar. on a chief gu. a tower triple-towered of the second.
47) (Walpole and Marshland, co. Norfolk). Or, a cher. engr. betw. three Cornish choughs sa. a bordure az. bezantée. Crest—A battle axe and spear in saltire, handles gu. heads ar. mounted or.
48) (Fakenham, co. Norfolk). Gu. a lion couchant ar. a canton or. Crest—A lion couchant sa.
49) (Esthall, co. Oxford; Rice Jones Visit. Oxon, 1634, grandson of John Jones, of Kenioke, co. Flint, who was grandson of Griffith ap David Goch, alias Jones, 1465). Sa. a buck pass. ar. attired or. Crest—A buck pass. ar.
50) (Chilton and Shrewsbury, co. Salop; granted 16 June, 1607). Ar. a lion ramp. vert, vulned in the breast gu. Crest—A sun in splendour or.
51) (co. Somerset, 1645). Vert a chev. betw. three wolves’ heads erased ar.
52) (co. Salop, Lord Mayor of London). Ar. a lion pass. betw. three crosses pattée fitchée gu. a chief az.
53) (Wales). Sa. a chev. betw. three spear heads ar. Crest—A cubit arm erect in armour ppr. holding in the gauntlet a spear of the first, headed ar. embrued gu.
54) (Edward Jones, a native of co. Montgomery, was consecrated Bishop of Cloyne, 1683, and translated to St. Asaph, 1692, d. 1703). Sa. three horses’ heads erased ar.
55) (Revell, co. Wilts). Ar. a lion pass. sa. langued gu. armed or, on a chief of the second a ducal coronet of the last. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi lion ramp. sa. langued gu. armed of the first.
56) (Uppingham, co. Rutland). Or, a lion ramp. az. Crest—A paschal lamb ppr.
57) (exemplified to John Henry Whitmore, Esq., on his assuming the surname and arms of Jones, Chastleton House, co. Oxford). Motto—Incorrupta fides. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. a lion ramp. within a border indented or, a canton erm.; 2nd and 3rd, vert fretty or, for Whitmore.
58) (Badsworth Hall, co. York). Motto—Till then thus. Or, a lion ramp. az., quartering Longueville. Crest—A talbot’s head couped at the shoulders gu. gorged with a collar dancettée erm.
59) (Shackerley Hall, co. Salop). Mottoes—Ovner na ovno angau; and, Esto sol testis. Ar. a lion ramp. vert, wounded in the breast gu. Crests—1st: The sun in splendour or; 2nd: On an eastern crown or, a dragon pass. guard. gu.
60) (Kelston Park, co. Somerset). Erm. a lion ramp. az.
61) (Larkhill, West Derby, co. Lancaster). Motto—Till then thus. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, a lion ramp. az.; 2nd and 3rd, gu. a fesse dancettée erm. betw. six crosses crosslet ar. Crest—A talbot's head couped at the shoulders gu. collared dancettée ar.
62) (Ystrad, co. Carmarthen; a branch of Jones, of Llansadaial). Ar. a chev. flory gu. betw. three stags’ heads cabossed ppr. Crest—A stag's head ppr. Motto—Heb Dduw heb ddim.
63) (Trewythen, co. Montgomery; descended from Cadwgan Lord of Nannau, in Merioneth, younger son of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, King of Powys. The senior male line terminated in an heiress, Mary, m. Bowen Jones, Esq., of Cefn Penworth, descended from Jones, of Trewythen). Motto—Frangas non flectes. Quarterly, or, a lion ramp. gu. langued and armed of the first; 2nd and 3rd, sa. three nags’ heads ar. Crest—A lion ramp. as in the arms.
64) (Derry Ormond, co. Cardigan). Ar. a chev. betw. three boars’ heads couped sa. Crest—The sun in splendour ppr.
65) (Gwynfryn, co. Cardigan). Motto—Mors mlhi lucrum. Ar. a cross flory sa. betw. four Cornish choughs ppr. Crest—A demi lion ramp. ppr.
66) (Llanio, co. Cardigan; descended from Daniel Jones of Llanio, who took the name of Jones in 1693, son of John ap Griffith Goch, and grandson of Griffith Goch). (Plympton, co. Devon; descended from Thomas Jones, Esq., of Llanio, High Sheriff of Cardigan in 1739). Or, a lion ramp. reguard. sa. a bordure engr. gobony ar. and az.
67) (Hartsheath, co. Flint). Motto—Heb nevol nerth, nid sicr saeth: Without help from above, the arrow flies in vain. As originally borne—Ar. a chev. betw. three boars’ heads couped gu. Crest—A boar’s head couped gu.
68) (Fitzroy Square, London, and Clifton, co. Gloucester). Or, a lion ramp. az. Crest—A buck at gaze ppr.
69) (Goodrich, co. Hereford, originally of Bwlch Gwent, co. Carmarthen). Gu. three arrows or, feathered and bearded ar. Crest—A hand and dart ppr.
70) (Nass, near Lydney, and Hay Hill, near Newnham, co. Gloucester; seated at the former place since the reign of Queen Elizabeth). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. Crest—A Cornish chough ppr.
71) (Sugwas, Poulstone, Cleve, and Mountcraig, co. Hereford; claiming descent from Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, King of Powis, and settled in co. Hereford more than 300 years, descended of the family of Jones, of Lanwame, co. Hereford, to whom Dethick granted arms, 10 June, 1566. These arms were borne by Philip Jones, Esq., High Sheriff, co. Hereford, 1811, by Edmund Jones, Esq., M.D. and J.P., of Mountcraig, and others). Or, on a mount vert a lion ramp. az. Arms, now used, recorded in Herald’s College— Gu. on a bend engr. ar. betw. two stags' heads erased erminois three trefoils slipped vert. Crest—A gauntlet lying fesseways, holding a spear enfiled with a boar’s head erased ppr.
72) (Sugwas, Poulstone, Cleve, and Mountcraig, co. Hereford; claiming descent from Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, King of Powis, and settled in co. Hereford more than 300 years, descended of the family of Jones, of Lanwame, co. Hereford, to whom Dethick granted arms, 10 June, 1566. These arms were borne by Philip Jones, Esq., High Sheriff, co. Hereford, 1811, by Edmund Jones, Esq., M.D. and J.P., of Mountcraig, and others). Or, on a mount vert a lion ramp. az. Arms, now used, recorded in Herald’s College— Gu. on a bend engr. ar. betw. two stags' heads erased erminois three trefoils slipped vert. Crest—A gauntlet lying fesseways, holding a spear enfiled with a boar’s head erased ppr.
73) (Maes-y-Gannedd; descended from Ievan, of Maes-y-Gannedd, son of Ievan ap Ievan, Constable of Harlech Castle, temp. Henry VI., from Osborne Fitzgerald, Lord of Ynysymaengwyn). Arms, those of Osborne Fitzgerald, viz.: Erm. a saltire gu.
74) (Fonmon Castle, co. Glamorgan). This quartered coat is taken from a pedigree compiled at the Heralds’ College, 1654, attested by George Owen, York Herald. Quarterly, 1st, sa. a chev. ar. betw. three spear heads ar. the points embrued with blood (borne as descended from Bleddin ap Maenarch, the last Lord of Brecon); 2nd, ar. a wyvern’s head erased vert, holding in the mouth a dexter hand gu., for the Lords of Monmouth; 3rd, gu. a chev. erm., for Philip Gwys, Lord of Wiston, co. Pembroke; 4th, ar. a stag couchant gu. the horns and hoofs or, and holding in the mouth a branch vert, for Mallt, or Matilda, dau. and sole heiress of Llewellyn Ychan ap Llewellyn, a large proprietor in Gower, co. Glamorgan. Crest—A cubit arm erect in armour ppr. in the gauntlet a spear of the first headed ar. embrued gu.
75) (Lancych, or Blaencych, co. Pembroke; descended maternally from Cadifor Vawr, Lord of Blaencych). Motto—Sine numine nihilum. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, a lion ramp. reguard. sa. armed and langued gu., for Jones; 2nd and 3rd, sa. three scaling ladders ar. and betw. the two uppermost a spear’s head of the last, the point embrued ppr. on a chief gu. a tower triple-towered of the second, for Lloyd, of Ffoeshelig, co. Cardigan, and Lancych, co. Pembroke. Crest—A lion ramp. reguard. sa. armed and langued gu.
76) (Pant-glas, co. Carmarthen). Motto—Da-ei-fydd. Ar. on a mount vert a representation of a Pembroke ox statant ppr. a chief gu. thereon a falcon ar. belled betw. two stags’ heads erased or. Crest—A mount vert, thereon a representation of a Pembroke ox’s head in profile erased ppr. bezantée.
77) (Gelligynan, co. Denbigh; descended from Cowayd ap Cadvan, a chieftain of Duffryn Clwyd, and now represented by John Carstairs Jones, Esq., of Gelligynan and Hartsheath, co. Flint, eldest son of the late Wilson Jones, Esq., of Hartsheath, Cefn Coch, and Gelligynan, M.P. for Denbigh). Motto: Heb nevol nerth nid sicr saeth. Gu. on a chev. or, betw. three escocheons ar. each charged with a boar’s head couped of the first, an arrow palewise ppr. Crest: On a mount vert a boar's head couped gu. in front of an arrow palewise ppr.
78) (granted to Valentine Jones, Esq., Captain 10th Light Dragoons, only son and heir of Valentine Jones, Esq., late of Bailbroote House, co. Somerset, and grandson of Valentines Jones, of Belfast). Per bend sinister erm. and ermines a lion ramp. within a bordure engr. or. Crest—A boar's head erased per bend sinister erm. and ermines.
79) (Beaver Hill, co. Derby; granted to Henry Cadman Jones, Esq.). Motto—Esto fidells usque ad mortem. Ar. a cross indented gu. betw. four spear heads az. each betw. two laurel branches ppr. Crest—In front of a spear betw. two laurel branches ppr. a cross pattée gu.
80) Gu. a chev. az. betw. three nags’ heads erased ar. Crest—A nag's head, as in the arms.
81) Quarterly, sa. and gu. a cross ar. in the 1st and 4th quarters three lance-rests or, in the 2nd and 3rd as many cockatrices of the last.
82) (granted to Morgan Jones, Esq., son of Jacob Jones, Esq., of Kilwendeage, co. Pembroke, a descendant of the families of Morgan, Jones, and Trench, a branch of the Trenches of Ireland). Motto—Pro patriâ et rege. Ar. on a chev. betw. two bulls’ heads erased in chief and a lion pass. in base az. a tower ensigned by a ducal coronet or, betw. two boars' heads couped of the field. Crest—A boar’s head erased az. tusked or, in front of a dexter arm embowed in armour ppr. garnished gold, the hand within a gauntlet in the attitude of striking with a scymitar also ppr. the hilt of the second.
83) (Sir Ellis Jones, knighted at Reban, co. Kildare, 12 March, 1603). Vert a cross crosslet or.
84) (Sir Roger Jones, knighted at Drogheda, 24 March, 1606). Az. on a cross betw. four pheons, points down or, five estoiles gu. Crest—An arm couped at the elbow erect, vested or, the hand holding a pheon, point upwards ar.
85) (Vintnerstown, co. Londonderry; Fun. Ent. 1623, Sir Baptist Jones). Ar. a cross ragulée gu. on a chief sa. two pheons, points down or.
86) (Charles Jones, Esq., 1683; Fun. Ent. of his sister, Anne, wife of Sir Thomas Harman, Knt., of Athy). Sa. a buck trippant ar. horned or.
87) (confirmed by Roberts, Ulster, 1647. to Bryan Jones, Esq., Dublin; descended from an ancient Welsh family). Motto—Deus fortitudo mea. Gu. three lioncels ramp. guard. or, on a canton of the second a fret of the first. Crest—A talbot’s head couped ar. langued and chained gu.
88) (Bealanamore and Headford, co. Leitrim; descended from Bryan Jones, Esq., of the city of Dublin, Auditor of War, the descendant of an ancient family in Wales, who had a grant of lands 1662, and was great-grandfather of Theophilus Jones, Esq., of Bealanamore, co. Dublin, and afterwards of Headford, co. Leitrim, whose grandson, Right Hon. Theophilus Jones, of Headford, a Privy Councillor in Ireland, was M.P. for the county of Leitrim, and subsequently for the borough of Coleraine). Motto—Deus fortitudo mea. Gu. two lioncels ramp. guard. or, armed and langued az. on a canton of the second a fret of the first. Crest—A talbot’s head couped ar. langued and chained gu.
89) (confirmed by Carney, Ulster, 1683, to Edward Jones, Esq., co. Wexford, son and heir of Ven. Richard Jones, of Croiswyan, co. Flint, Archdeacon of Ferns). Motto—Pawb yn ol ei arfer. Ar. a chev. ermines betw. three boars’ heads erased sa. armed or, langued gu. Crest—A boar’s head erased and erect ermines.
90) (Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1651). Quarterly, 1st, or, a lion ramp. gu.; 2nd, per pale or and sa. three fleurs-de-lis counterchanged; 3rd, sa. three nags’ heads erased ar.; 4th, vert a stag trippant ar. attired or.
91) (Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, Jeremiah Jones, d. in Dublin 1661). Per bend sinister erm. and ermines a lion ramp. or, a border engr. of the last. Crest—A wolf statant ar. resting the dexter paw on a human head erased ppr.
92) (Fun. Ent. Ambrose Jones, Bishop of Kildare, 1667-78). Gu. three boars' heads erased in pale ar.
93) (Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1674). Gu. on a cross betw. four mullets or, a pheon with broken staff, point downwards, of the field.
94) (Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1676, Alderman Jones, of Dublin). Sa. a fess embattled counter-embattled erm. betw. three boars' heads couped or.
95) (Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1677, the wife of Rev. Doctor Jones). Per fess indented or and az. a lion ramp. counterchanged.
96) (Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1678, Captain Jones). Gu. a cross crossed on three grieces or.
97) (Benada Castle, co. Sligo; Reg. Ulster's Office). Gu. on a chev. betw. four mullets pierced or, a broken spear, pheon downwards. Crest—A wing gu. semée of estoiles or.
98) (Reg. Ulster’s Office, to Alderman Jones, of Dublin). Per saltire ar. and az. two garbs in pale gu. and as many pheons, points down, in fess or.
99) (confirmed to Sir Lewis Tobias Jones, K.C.B., Admiral, retired list, and to the other descendants of his grandfather, Lewis Jones Esq., of the family of Jones, of Ardnaglass, co. Sligo). Motto—Periculum ex alus facito. Per bend sinister erm. and ermines a lion ramp. or, armed and langued gu. a bordure engr. of the third. Crest—A lion couchant or, armed and langued gu. charged on the shoulder with a trefoil slipped vert.
100) (Walsall, co. Stafford; granted to William Jones, Esq.. of that place). Motto—Diligentia. Per chev. az. and vert, in chief three suns in splendour, and in base a lion ramp. reguard. or. Crest—Issuant from a sun rising in splendour ppr. a lion's head vert semée of bezants.
101) (New South Wales; granted to Henry Jones, Esq.). Motto—Perseverantia ad finem optatum. Az. a goat statant ar. horned, crined, and unguled or, in chief three stars of eight points of the laat. Crest—A stag or collared, with line reflexed over the back sa. resting the dexter foot on a shield az. charged with a star, as in the arms.
102) (Marsham-Jones, Hayle Cottage, co. Kent; exemplified to Henry Shovell Marsham Esq., upon his assuming, by royal licence, the additional surname of Jones). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. two lioncels ramp. guard. or, armed and langued az. on a canton of the second a fret of the first, in chief a cross crosslet for distinction, for Jones; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a lion pass. gu. betw. two bendlets az., for Marsham. Crests—1st, Jones: A talbot’s head couped ar. langued and chained gu. charged on the neck, for distinction, with a cross crosslet also gu.; 2nd, Marsham: A lion's head erased gu. langued az.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
14. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
17. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489