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Kelder Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Kelder Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Kelder Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Kelder. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Kelder Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Kelder blazon are the mason’s mark, arm in armour and hammer. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, sable and or .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the masons mark Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures.

The Arm appears frequently in the crest of a coat of arms, often armoured and described in some detail as to its appearance and attitude. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:arm It can also appear on the shield itself as a charge. The arm itself is said to signify a “laboorious and industrious person” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P92, whilst the arm in armour may denote “one fitted for performance of high enterprise” 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P184

It is important that a coat of arms be easily recognised and so everyday objects were frequently used as clearly identifiable charges – tools 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69 being a common and important example of these, of which the hammer is typical. Some of these tools are rather obscure to modern eyes, who of us nowadays would recognise a hemp-break 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P163, let alone know what to use it for! The hammer is usually drawn conventionally, with a wooden handle and large metal head. 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Hammer

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Kelder Name

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Gueldre D'argent à une marque de marchand de sable formée d'une vergette le sommet supportant un chevron diminué et alésé la vergette traversée à ses deux tiers inférieurs par une traverse en fasce ayant à sa partie senestre une petite vergette pendant de ladite traverse et une cotice en barre partant du pied senestre du chevron traversant la vergette à son point d'intersection avec la fasce et se terminant au delà Cimier un vol. English: Argent a mason’s mark sable formed of a palet the top supporting a small chevron couped the palet crossed two thirds of the way down by a cross-piece fesswise having on the part to the sinister a small palet hanging from the aforementioned cross-piece and a small bend [bendwise] leaving the the sinister foot of the chevron crossing the palet at the point of intersection with the fess and terminating beyond [the mason’s mark is a unique shape made on a piece of masonry with a few simple chisel blows - see for example https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Vitré_(35)_Église_Notre-Dame_Marque_de_Marchand_4.JPG , so you could give it a bit of depth?] Crest: a pair of wings.
2) (van Der). Hollande De gueules à un senestrochère armé d'or tenant un marteau du même posé en barre Casque couronné Cimier un homme d'armes issant cuirassé d'or la visière levée le casque panaché de gueules d'or et de sable les bras étendus tenant de chaque main un marteau d'or le tout entre un vol coupé alternativement de gueules et d'or. English: Gules an armoured left arm or holding a hammer of the same bendwise Crowned with a helmet Crest: an armoured man issuant breastplate or the visor [of the helmet] raised the helmet plumed gules, or and sable the arms extended holding in each hand a hammer or, all between a pair of wings coloured alternately gules and or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:arm
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P92
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P184
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P163
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Hammer
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
18. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
19. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
20. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
21. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
22. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
23. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
24. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
25. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
26. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
27. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:arm
28. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P92
29. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P184
30. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69
31. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P163
32. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Hammer