O’Hagan Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

O'hagan Family Coat of Arms

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O'hagan Coat of Arms Meaning

O'hagan Name Origin & History

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O'hagan Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the O’Hagan blazon are the covered cup and shoe. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and ermine.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Cups of all kinds have been popular charges on coats of arms since at least the 14th century. 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cup In appearance and description they range from simple drinking pots (GERIARE of Lincoln – Argent three drinking pots sable) to covered cups, more like chalices in appearance. 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P288. These were borne by the BUTLER family in reference to their name and Wade suggests that their appearance may also refer to holy communinion within the church. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117

When people are depicted in heraldry their clothing and appearance are often described in some detail 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174. We also find individual items of clothing used as charges in a coat of arms, and shoe is a good example of this. Sometimes these items are drawn in a somewhat stylised fashion, but this helps with recognition, important in distinguishing arms. Wade suggests that this may be representing “strength, stability and expedition”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P93

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the O'hagan Name

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Chiefs of Tullahogue, in the Barony of Dungannon, co. Tyrone, and Brehone to O’Neill, Prince of Tyrone. The clan of O'Hagan (O’Haedhagain) had their seat in ancient times at Tullahogue, in the county of Tyrone, and in this fortress, according to Dr. O’Donovan, in his “Tribes and Customs of Hy Fiachrach," the Kings of Ulster were solemnly inaugurated into the style and authority of O’Neill, by O’Hagan, Chieftain of Tullahogue, in whom vested the hereditary right to perform the ceremony). Motto—Vincere aut mori. Quarterly, ar and az. in 1st quarter a shoe ppr. on a canton per chev. gu. and erm. three covered cups or; in 2nd quarter a flag of the first charged with a dexter hand of the fourth; in 3rd quarter a lion ramp. of the sixth; and in 4th quarter a fish naiant ppr. Crest—A cubit arm vested gu. cuffed erm. the hand holding a dagger erect both also ppr.
2) (Baron O'Hagan, of Tullahogue; Right Hon. Thomas O’Hagan, Lord Chancellor of Ireland, 1868-74, was so created 1870). Motto—Buadh no bas (Victory or death). Quarterly, ar and az. in the 1st quarter a shoe ppr. and on a canton per chev. gu. and erm. three covered cups or; in the 2nd quarter a flag of the first charged with a dexter hand of the fourth; in the 3rd quarter a lion ramp. of the sixth, and in the 4th quarter a fish naiant ppr. Crest—On a Roman fasces lying fessewise ppr. a cubit arm vested gu. cuffed erm. the hand holding a dagger erect both ppr. Supporters—Two lions or, collared sa. each holding a banner ar. charged with a dexter hand gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cup
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P288
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P93