Kell Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Kell Family Coat of Arms

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Kell Coat of Arms Meaning

Kell Name Origin & History

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Kell Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Kell blazon are the mullet, garb and lion. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and gules .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.7The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

Europe in the middle ages was still a largely agrarian society, and the wealth of the nobility resided in their estates and land. Since most people still lived and worked on the land they would find farm implements instantly recognisable, (an important feature for a coat of arms), even if they seem obscure to us today. 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86 The garb for example is an ancient word for wheatsheaf, something now more frequently seen in Inn signs than in the field! 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 16Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 17Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 18A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 19The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Kell Name

Kell Origin:

England

Origins of Kell:

It is a fascinating English surname, but the Scandinavian-Viking origin is older – before the 7th century. It was put down into writing in various spellings like Kell, Kelle, Kells, And Chell, and acquired by the Norse word “Kel” a simple form of the name of a male Ketill. It has a very unusual meaning of the sacrificial cauldron. That said, particular old names frequently had ketil or kell as an essential part, consisting Asketill which means Gods Kettlet, and Thorkell, consisting the religious Gods name of Thor, the God of crashing sounds and wrecking in Scandinavian folklore. According to the early examples of British recordings included Reginaldus filius Chelle in the Lancashire ordinance Rolls of the year 1219, and in the Chartulary of Ramsey Abbey, Cambridgeshire, the Chel filius Mabillae, dated 1250. Surnames originally evolved from given names are with the ancient inherited surnames, and this is an excellent example, having remained the same over so many centuries. The very first examples of the name included Isabella Kelle of Huntingdonshire, in 1311, and Rogerus Kelle, in the Poll Tax records of Yorkshire in the year 1379. A coat of weapons combined with the name has the embellish of a gold shield, on a green chevron, in the mid of a lion passant in essential and two red mullets in the base, three golden feathers.

Variations:

More common variations are: Kelly, Keall, Keill, Kiell, Keell, Kello, Kyell, Kwell, Kuell, Kella.

England:

The origins of the surname Kell were in Hampshire, but the name could have evolved originally from the area Keld of which there are two names in England, that are Keld or Keilde, a small town or city in Cumbria and Keld also derived from another small town or city in North Yorkshire. Another mention area, the name was “anciently written Cail, and spoken by the people to be evolve from Caily in Normandy.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Ansfredus Kelle, dated 1176. It was during the time of King Henry II who was known to be the “Builder of Churches,” dated 1154 – 1189, and took place in “Pipe Rolls of Hampshire.” The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the Kell clan had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States:

People of the Kell surname arrived in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th,18th, and 19th. Individuals who moved in the 17th century included Richard Kell, who landed in Virginia in 1654. Neil Kell, who landed in New Jersey and also sailed to America in 1685 during the 17th century.

Niklaas Kell and Jurg Andries who arrived in New York in 1709 and the same year Georg Wilhelm landed in New Jersey. David Kell sailed Philadelphia in 1742 during the 18th century. Also Joh Geo Kell in Pennsylvania in 1744.

John Kell and John Kell came in the same year in 1811 during the 19th century. Thomas Kell who landed in New York, NY in 1816. James F Kell who arrived in South Carolina in 1823. William Kell landed in Missouri 1842.

Australia:

Thomas Smith Kell, Christopher Smith, Emma Kell, Frances Ann Kell, Frederick Polhill Kell all of these arrived in the same city in Adelaide, Australia in the same year in 1838 during the 19th century, abroad the ship “Rajasthan.”

New-Zealand:

People of the Kell surname moved to New Zealand during the 19th century included Edward James Kell, at the age of 30, a designer, arrived in Nelson abroad the ship “Camperdown” in 1876.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Kell: United States 6,314; England 1,678; Brazil 1,463; Germany 1,345; Cameroon 892; Canada 718; Australia 717; South Africa 566; Russia 445; Estonia 214.

Notable People:

Ayla Kell was an American artist and entertainer. She was born in the year 1990.

Douglas Kell (born 1953), is a British biochemist at the University of Manchester and presently Chief Administrative of the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC).

Frank Kell (1859-1941), was an industrial worker and a businessperson from Wichita Falls, Texas.

Elizabeth Kell was an Australian rower. He was born in 1938.

George Kell (1922–2009), was the third baseman called up into the Baseball Hall of Fame in the year 1983.

Kell Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Or, on a chevron vert between a lion pass, in chief and two mullets in base gules three garbs or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
16. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
17. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
18. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60