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Kingsley Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Kingsley Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Kingsley Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Kingsley. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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kingsley coat of arms

Kingsley Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Kingsley blazon are the buglehorn and cross engrailed. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, sable and argent .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The hunting horn, or bugle horn has a distinctive shape, being curved almost into a semi-circle, it can be decorated with bands of a different colour and typically hangs from a string, also coloured. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:hunting horn. Apart from its obvious reference to the pursuit of hunting, it has also been used in allusion to the name of the holderr (HUNTER of Hunterston) and Woowward suggests it is also associated with those who have rights or obligations to the forest. 10A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P400

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67. The pattern engrailed is a series of scalloped indentations with the points facing outwards – and should not be confused with invected, which has the points facing inwards! Wade believes that both of these indented forms represent “earth or land”, and one perhaps can indeed see the furrowed earth embodied in them.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Kingsley Name

Origins of Kingsley:
This interesting name is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a locational surname acquiring from any one of the places called ‘Kingsley’ in Cheshire, Hampshire and Staffordshire.  The places in Cheshire and Staffordshire noted as ‘Chingeslie’ in the Domesday Book of 1086 and that in Hampshire as ‘Kyngesly’ in 1210.  The place names all share the same meaning and origin, which is ‘the glade, clearing, of the king’, or ‘chieftain’, acquired from the Old English pre 7th Century ‘cyning’, King, originally chieftain, tribal leader, with ‘leah’, thin wood, glade, clearing.  Locational surnames usually acquired by those old residents of a place who moved to another area and were best recognised by the name of their birthplace.  Charles Kingsley (1819-1875), the English clergyman and writer of ‘Westward Hol’, and ‘The Water Babies’ is probably the best-known holder of the name.

Variations:
More common variations are: Kiingsley, Kaingsley, Kingsleey, Kingsly, Kingsle, Kingwesley, Kingsale, Kingsely, Kingslee.

England:
The surname Kingsley first appeared in Cheshire where a “township and estate, the property of Sir Ranulph de Kingsley before 1128 appeared. In the XVIII century, the family divided into two branches, the younger continuing the name of Kingsley, the elder adopting that of De Aula or Hale.”  Another early listing of the name was Adam de Kyngeslegh who noted in East Cheshire.  Kingsley is a township, civil church and a village in the parish of Frodsham, union of Runcorn.  It first noted in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Chingeslie.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of William de Kingesle, dated 1246, in the Lancashire Assize Rolls. It was during the reign of King Henry 111, who was known as “The Frenchman”, dated 1216-1272.  Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:
Some of the people with the name Kingsley who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included William Kingsley settled in Virginia in 1623.  William Kingsley, who arrived in Virginia in 1623.  Steven Kingsley, who settled in Salem Massachusetts in 1630.  John Kingsley, who landed in Massachusetts in 1630-1634.  John Kingsley settled in Salem and was a prominent Quaker in 1635. Some of the people with the surname Kingsley who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Thomas Kingsley, who landed in America in 1811.

Australia:
Some of the individuals with the surname Kingsley who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Samuel Kingsley, aged 46, a porter, arrived in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship “Eliza”.  Samuel Kingsley arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Eliza” in 1849.

Kingsley Family Gift Ideas

Browse Kingsley family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Kingsley, co. Chester, temp. Henry II., hereditary Forester of Delamere under the Norman earls palatine; its representative in the female line is Helen Katherine, Countess of Haddington, wife of George, eleventh Earl of Haddington, dau. and only child of Sir John Warrender, fifth bart. of Lochead, by his second wife, the Hon. Frances Henrietta Arden, eldest sister of Richard Pepper, third and last Lord Alvanley). Vert a cross engr. erm.; and on an honorary escutcheon of pretence, ar. a bugle strung sa., the escutcheon is sometimes borne as an additional coat.
2) (Canterbury). Sa. a cross engr. erm. in the 1st quarter a mullet or. Crest—A goat's head couped ar.
3) (Sorrett, co. Hertford). Vert a cross engr. ar. (another, erm.). Crest, as the last.
4) Ar. a buglehorn stringed sa.
5) Ar. a fesse sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:hunting horn
10. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P400
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
17. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
19. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
20. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
21. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:hunting horn
22. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P400
23. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
24. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67