Kinross Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Kinross Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Kinross. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Kinross Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Kinross blazon are the sword, hand and chevron. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and azure .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. Indeed, the sheer variety of different swords 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302 can be bewildering and expaining the difference between a scimitar and a falchion is perhaps best left to the expert! If a charge is described just as a simple sword then it will have a straight blade and cross handle, that may be of a different colour, and, unless specified, points upwards. Wade, quoting the earlier writer Guillim, signifies the use of the sword as representing “Government and Justice”.

The hand, unless we are told otherwise is a dexter (right) hand shown palm outwards and fingers upwards.11A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P305. It demonstrates faith, sincerity and justice, and in the form of two right hands clasped can mean union or alliance12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W Cecil Wade 1898 P92. There is a special form called the “Hand of Ulster” which is a sinister hand gules on an argent background (a left hand, red upon white). Originally the Badge of Ulster, the Province of Northern Ireland, it has come to be used as an addition to existing arms, in an escutcheon (small shield) or canton (small square) to indicate that the holder is also a Baronet.13Heraldry Historical and Popular, Charles Boutell, 1864 P56

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.15The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Kinross Name

Variations:
More common variations are: Kinros, Kinrose, Kainaros, Kinirosi, Kinrys, Kinris, Kinors, Kinres, Kahn-Ross, Caineross.

England:
The surname Kinross first appeared in Kinross-shire, where they held a family seat in their areas.  The Pictish impact on Scottish history decreased after Kenneth Macalpine became King of all Scotland.  But those east coast families still played an important role in government and were more accessible to Government than their western highland counterparts.

New Zealand:
People with the surname Kinross settled in New Zealand in the 19th century.  Some of the people with the name Kinross moved to New Zealand in the 19th century included Robert Kinross arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Empress” in 1865.  Thomas Kinross arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “British King” in 1883.  Agnes Kinross arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “British King” in the year 1883.  Violet Kinross arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “British King” in the same year 1883.

Kinross Family Gift Ideas

Browse Kinross family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Scotland). Gu. two swords in saltire ar. hilted or, betw. four hands couped apaumee ppr.
2) (Scotland). Gu. a chev. chequy or and az. betw. three swords paleways ar. hilts and pommels or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302
11. A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P305
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W Cecil Wade 1898 P92
13. Heraldry Historical and Popular, Charles Boutell, 1864 P56
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
15. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45