Kirkaldie Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Kirkaldie Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Kirkaldie. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

kirkaldie coat of arms

Kirkaldie Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Kirkaldie blazon are the star, crescent and chevron. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, or and gules .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

There were of course many widely recognised symbols that existed long before the advent of heraldry and it should be no surprise that some of these were adopted as charge in coats of arms 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301. The estoile is a typical example, reflecting the stars in the sky and represented with six wavy points, often with a little shading to give it some depth. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile. The ancient writer Guillim assigns these symbols as the emblems of God’s goodness”. 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77More modern arms might use the term star explicitly to refer to the celestial object, in which case it is usually known as a blazing star 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Star

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 16A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.17The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 18The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

Kirkaldie Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Kirkaldie Name

Origins of Kirkaldie:
Local. From Kirkcaldy, a town in Fifeshire, Scotland, from Kirk, a church, and Culdee, the worshipers of God, the first Christians of Britain, who were said to have had a place of worship there in old times.  Spelling variations of this family name include as Kircaldy, Kirkaldy, Kirkaldie, Kirkcaldy, Kirkcaldie, Kircaldie and much more.

Variations:
More common variations are: Kirkldie, Kircaldie, Kirkaldy, Kirkwald, Kirckaldy, Kirkalady, Kirklad, Kirklud, Kirkilaite, Karakalidi.

England:
The surname Kirkaldie first appeared in Fife, where they held a family seat in their areas.  The Pictish impact on Scottish history declined after Kenneth Macalpine became King of all Scotland.  But those east coast families still played an important role in government and were more accessible to Government than their western highland counterparts.

United States of America:
Some of the first settlers of this family name or some of its variants were: the name expressed in many forms and noted from the mid-17th century in the great migration from Europe.  Migrants settled in the eastern seaboard from Newfoundland to Maine, to Virginia, the Carolinas, and to the islands.

Kirkaldie Family Gift Ideas

Browse Kirkaldie family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More kirkaldie Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Inchture, co. Perth). Gu. three stars ar.
2) (Grange, Scotland, bart., 1604). Motto—Fortissima veritas. Gu. a chev. betw. three stars in chief and a crescent in base or. Crest—A man’s head, with the face looking upwards ppr.
3) (Scotland, 1672). Gu. a chev. invecked ar. betw. two stars in chief and a crescent in base or.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Star
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
16. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
17. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45