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Knoles Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Knoles Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Knoles Family Coat of Arms

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Knoles Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Knoles blazon are the crusily and cross moline voided. The two main tinctures (colors) are or and azure.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The word semee is an old word that is best translated as “strewn” or “scattered with” and refers to the background of the shield, or large shapes upon, being sprinkled with a large number of the following objects. 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Seme In this case semee of crosses crosslet means that the field is covered with small crosses, each arm of which is also crossed. The resulting pattern is particularly pleasing and of course signals the piety of the holder – indeed Wade believes that it represents “the fourfold mystery of the cross” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103Crusily may also be used as an alternate name

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. The cross moline is typical of these whereby each arm of the cross expands and curves outwards, reminscent of the fer-de-moline from which it gets its name. These cross variations are probably largely for decorative effect, and to differentiate the arms from similar ones and hence their significance is that of the Christian cross itself.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Knoles Name

Knoles Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Knoles:

According to the early recordings of the spelling of the name, this interesting and unique name was listed in many spelling forms as shown in the records below; this old and very English name is either geographical or just possibly a nickname. The former origin, it acquires from the pre 7th-century word “cnoll,” or the Middle English “knol,” both meaning a hilltop and so representing a person who resided at such a place. Geographical surnames were among the earliest formed since both original and human-made characteristics provided simple and useful different names in the small communities of the Middle Ages. A second possible origin is that it may be a nickname surname since there are sources in old records to the particular name of “Cnoll.” It was used in the transmitted sense of a short, fat person. Early records of the surname from both origins contain as Robert de la Cnolle of Devonshire in 1185, Thomas Knolle of Cambridgeshire in 1279, and William atte Knowle of Sussex in 1296. Henry Knowles was an early traveler to the American colonies, departing from London on the ship “Susan and Ellin” in April 1635, bound for Virginia colony.

Variations:

More common variations are: Knowles, Knoules, Knolles, Knooles, Knnoles, Knolws, Knoales, Knwoles, Noles, Knols.

England:

The surname Knole first appeared in Yorkshire where they held a family seat from old times. Some say well before the Norman Invasion and the coming of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Christopher Knolles, dated about 1407, in the “Register of the Freemen of the City of York.” It was during the time of King Henry IV who was known to be the “Henry of Bolingbroke,” dated 1399 – 1413. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Knoles had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the name Knoles who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included John Knoles, who came to Maryland in 1637. Tristram Knoles, who landed in Virginia in 1662.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Knoles: United States 771; Canada 14; Australia 6; England 1; Mexico 1

Notable People:

Thom Knoles is a Maharishi (or pre-eminent master-teacher) of Vedic Study (a simple mental system that allows one to experience fully-awake restful awareness and its many physiological advantages). He has tens of thousands of personally taught students worldwide. He is a thought-leader and dedicated speaker on the cognitive sciences, on the health of the body, on the relationship between quantum physics and human awareness, and on the 5,000 year-old body of experience known as the Veda (knowledge governing the unity of the laws of nature and human awareness from which yoga, examination, and Ayur Veda are determined). In India, he is called “Maharishi Vyasananda.” It means “the great predictor who sequentially develops knowledge blissfully.” Born in the 1950s to American parents in post-war Germany.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Az. crusily a cross moline voided throughout or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Seme
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Seme
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
18. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
19. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
20. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128