Lander Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Lander Family Coat of Arms

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Lander Coat of Arms Meaning

Lander Name Origin & History

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Lander Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Lander blazon are the paly and fesse. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, sable and or .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Play is what is known as a treatment, a regular patterning, usually over the whole background of the shield. The word comes from the pale, the major vertical stripe that appears on some shields, paly is obvious its little cousin, consisting of, typically, 6 or more vertical stripes, alternately coloured 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Paly. The stripes can be any combination of the heraldic tinctures, an early example is that of GURNEY, being simply paly of six, or and argent. Paly can be combined with other effects, such as decorative edges on each stripe, or overlaid with other treatments such as bendy, and these can be very effective and pleasing to the eye 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P121.

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Lander Name

Lander Origin:

Germany, Scotland, England

Origins of Lander:

This interesting and unique surname has complicated origins. It may be an improvement of the Olde French “Lavendier” which was usually anglicized to Launder and Lander, and explains one who held the local washing, and because of this, it is also professional. The same word was used to call to a textile industry worker who washed the clothes after filling and coloring. Most of the British name bearers will have Germanic or Anglo-Saxon origins. In another situation, the name is geographical and explains a fellow citizen, one who lived on the land, as oppposed to a city resident. It is also possible that more examples will apply to the town of Landau in Germany. What is definite is that the name has been registered in England for a very long time. Early examples contain Ralf la Lavendere in the Somerset Rolls of 1268, Thomas Launder of Yorkshire in 1331, and Elizabeth Lander in the Hearth Rolls of Suffolk for 1524. According to early Church documentations contain Nicholas Launder at the church of St Benet Fink, London, in September 1539, and Catharina Lander at Grossgarten, Neckarkreis, Wuertt, (Germany), on September 1617. The Coat of arms or national symbol donated to the name bearers describe a paly of eight black and gold, decorated with a red fess, and a crest of a hand emerging from a cloud, handling a sword.

Variations:

More common variations are: Launder, Landery, Lannder, Leander, Landere. Landero, Leander, Landera, Llander, Landeri.

England:

The origins of the surname Lander is found in Bedfordshire, where Almaric de Landres held lands in Bedforshire and Buckinghamshire in the 13th century.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Ysabelle la Lauendere, dated about 1253, in the rolls of Oseney Abbey, Oxfordshire. It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Lander had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Lander settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Lander who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Peter Lander who arrived in Virginia in the year 1704. David Lander landed in Maryland in 1716. Thomas Lander settled in Annapolis in 1719. John Lander came to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1724 and Samuel Lander arrived in Georgia in the year 1737.

Some of the people with the surname Lander who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Jonas Lander who would eventually settle in New York in 1804. Anthony Lander in Allegany Division, Pennsylvania in the year 1836. Michael Lander at the age of 55 landed in Missouri in 1846 and John Lander arrived in New York in the year 1846.

Canada:

People with the surname Lander settled in Canada in two different centuries respectively in 18th and 19th. Some of the individuals with the surname Lander who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Mr. Andrew Lander in Canada in 1784.

The following century saw much more Lander surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Lander who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Stephen Lander who landed in Bayley’s Cove, Newfoundland in 1806. William Lander settled in Catalina, Newfoundland in 1808.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Lander who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Mary Anne Lander who arrived in Kangaroo Island aboard the ship “Hartley” in 1837. Patrick Lander arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Indus” in 1839. Edward Lander, Mary Anne Lander, and Edward Little Lander arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ships “Duke of Bedford” and “Harpley” in the same year 1848.

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Lander who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included John Lander arrived in Bay of Island, New Zealand aboard the ship “Aquillain” in the year 1836. Alfred Lander, Charles Lander, David Lander and Frederick Lander arrived in Wellington, New Zealand in the same year 1840.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Lander: United States 6,549; England 3,506; Australia 1,188; Canada 567; South Africa 530; Mexico 707; Sweden 819; Brazil 1,081; Venezuela 4,666; Germany 1,076.

Notable People:

Anton Lander (born 1991), was a Swedish player in ice hockey.

Bernard Lander (1915–2010), was the head of Touro College.

David Lander (born 1947), is an American artist and writer.

Eric Lander (born 1957), is an American scholar of geology.

Frederick W. Lander (1822–1862) was an American engineer.

Johnny Lander is an American football player.

Leena Lander (born 1955), is a Finnish author.

Lander Family Gift Ideas

Browse Lander family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Paly of eight sa. and or, a fesse gu. Crest—A hand issuing from a cloud holding a sword wavy all ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Paly
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P121
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse