Laver Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Laver Family Coat of Arms

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Laver Coat of Arms Meaning

Laver Name Origin & History

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Laver Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Laver blazon are the lion rampant and boar’s head. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, gules and sable .

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

In the middle ages, the wild boar, a far more fearsome creature than its domesticated relative, the pig was a much more commonly seen animal than today. It was also known as a sanglier. 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72 It can appear in many of the same poses that we see for the lion, but has its own (easily imagined!) position known as enraged! 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar We should not be surprised then that this “fierce combatant” is said to be associated with the warrior. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Laver Name

Laver Origin:

England

Origins of Laver:

Listed with the spellings of Laver, Lavers, and Laviss, this unique surname is old English and professional, although an improvement of the pre 10th century Old French “lavandier.” It was brought by the Normans after the 1066 invasion, this term was originally reported a worker in the wool industry, and was a metonymic or nickname for a person used to wash raw wool or rinse the cloth after fulling. In later years, it came to explain the owner of the hamlet laundry. Originally only surnames relating to land use were in any way inherited unless the children supported the parent’s profession. Even then only from the 13th century in England, and not until the 20th century in many countries, did inherited surnames become the normal method. Early examples of this surname recording contain as Cecilia la Lavander in the Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire for the year 1273, while Robert Laver was a witness at St Mary Magdalen, London, in June 1555. This was in the reign of Mary I, known as ‘Bloody Mary.’ One of the first immigrants in the new colonies of America was William Lavor, who departed from London, England, for the colony of ‘Virginia,’ in May 1635.

Variations:

More common variations are: Leaver, Lavery, Laiver, Lauver, Lawyer, Lavere, Lavera, Llaver, Laveri, Lyaver

England:

The surname Laver first appeared in Essex, where the Laver family first appeared. After the Norman Invasion of 1066, Duke William gave the lands of England to his lords for their assistance at the Battle of Hastings. Following the Norman custom, many of these new landholders took on the name of their holdings as a surname.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Ysabelle la Lauendere, dated about 1253, in the “Country Pipe Rolls of Oxfordshire”. It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Laver had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Laver landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th and 18th. Some of the people with the name Laver who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included William Laver landed in Virginia in 1635.

The following century saw more Laver surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Laver who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Michael Laver, who came to Philadelphia in 1751.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Laver who landed in Australia in the 19th century included William Laver, a shoemaker, arrived in New South Wales, Australia sometime between 1825 and 1832. Henry Laver, English prisoner from Somerset, who shifted aboard the “Argyle” on March 5th, 1831, settling in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia. John Laver arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Baboo” in 1840.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Laver who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Samuel Laver arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Mermaid” in 1859. Charles Laver and Caroline Laver, both arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Romulus” in the same year 1862. Robert Laver and Mercy Laver both arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Zealandia” in the same year 1881.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Laver: England 1,500; United States 939; Australia 555; Canada 373; South Africa 347; Ukraine 181; Romania 146; Spain 113; Scotland 112; Russia 110.

Notable People:

Arnold Laver was a wood trader.

Frank Laver was a cricket player.

James Laver was a fashion biographer, author, and scientist.

Michael Laver was an educational writer and political scientist.

Rod Laver was a tennis player.

Laver Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Or, on a cross gu. a lion ramp. ar. Crest—A talbot’s head erased gu. ducally crowned or.
2) Sa. three boars’ heads or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67