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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Felmersham, co Bedford). Per fesse gu. and ar. a pale and three gem rings counterchanged.
2) (co. Hertford, and London). Per fesse gu. and ar. a pale counterchanged, three fountains. Crest—A demi horse ar. gorged with a chaplet of lavender.
3) (cos. Hereford and Middlesex, and London; confirmed 7 May, 1623). Per fesse gu. and ar. a pale counterchanged, three plates.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Lavender Coat of Arms and Family Crest

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Lavender Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Lavender blazon are the gem ring, fountain and plate. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and argent.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5.

The most common form of household jewelery in heraldry is the ring or gem ring, shown with a jewel which may have a different colour. 6 Wade, incorrectly terms the annulet a finger ring, but assigns the meaning of “fidelity” to it – more properly this meaning belongs to the gem ring. 7

Fountain is represented in two forms in heraldry. In the British tradition it refers to a roundel with blue and white stripes (a roundel wavy azure and argent), reprenting the water at the bottom of a well. 8 In French heraldry it represents the decorative fountain to be found in gardens and may have sprays in a different colour. 9

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 10 One of the simplest such shapes is the plain circle, known to heralds as the roundle. 11 So popular is this charge that a shorthand has arisen for roundles of a particular colour and plate is a roundle argent, or white. Most authorities agree that the English usage signifies the “Manchet cake” or communion wafer and thus is a symbol of religious allegiance.

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References

  • 1 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 2 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 3 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
  • 4 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 5 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
  • 6 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:ring
  • 7 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P94
  • 8 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P123
  • 9 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fountain
  • 10 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
  • 11 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle