Lavington Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Lavington Family Coat of Arms

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Lavington Coat of Arms Meaning

Lavington Name Origin & History

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Lavington Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Lavington blazon are the saltire, boar’s head and covered cup. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and argent.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The saltire is one the major ordinaries, large charges that occupy the whole of the field 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire. Arguably one of the best uses of this device is that of the St. Andrews Cross, a white saltire on a blue background found on the Scottish flag. The saltire is obviously closely related to the Cross, and Wade in his work on Heraldic Symbology suggests additionally that it alludes to “Resolution”, whilst Guillim, an even more ancient writer, somewhat fancifully argues that it is awarded to those who have succesfully scaled the walls of towns! 7A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P63

In the middle ages, the wild boar, a far more fearsome creature than its domesticated relative, the pig was a much more commonly seen animal than today. It was also known as a sanglier. 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72 It can appear in many of the same poses that we see for the lion, but has its own (easily imagined!) position known as enraged! 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar We should not be surprised then that this “fierce combatant” is said to be associated with the warrior. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67

Cups of all kinds have been popular charges on coats of arms since at least the 14th century. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cup In appearance and description they range from simple drinking pots (GERIARE of Lincoln – Argent three drinking pots sable) to covered cups, more like chalices in appearance. 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P288. These were borne by the BUTLER family in reference to their name and Wade suggests that their appearance may also refer to holy communinion within the church. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Lavington Name

Lavington Origin:

England

Origins of Lavington:

This interesting name is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a locational surname deriving from any of the places called ‘Lavington’ in Sussex and in Wiltshire. The two places in Sussex, now called ‘Woolavington’ and ‘Barlavington’, and recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as ‘Levitone’ and ‘Barleventone’ respectively, were once (circa 750) called ‘Lafingatun’, which means ‘the hamlet of Lafa’s people’, derived from the Old English pre 7th Century particular name ‘Lafa’, with the addition ‘ing’ showing ‘people, family or clan of’, with ‘tun’, hamlet or settlement. The places recognized by the additions ‘wella’, water source and ‘beorg,’ which means hill, slope or ‘bere,’ barley, at an early date. The places in Wiltshire called priest’s (or West) and Market (or East) Lavington share the similar original meaning and origin as those in Sussex. The wedding of John Lavington and Joyce Button noted at All Hallows, London Wall, London, in May 1680.

Variations:

More common variations are: Leavington, Levington, Livington, Luvington, Lvngton, Livingtone, Livingeton, Liveington, Livingwton.

England:

The surname Lavington first appeared in Wiltshire, where they held a family seat from ancient times.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Hugh de Lavinton, dated about 1272, in the “The Book for Fees for Lincolnshire.” It was during the time of King Edward I who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272 – 1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Lavington had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Lavington landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Lavington who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Abell Lavington, who sailed to America in 1658. John Lavington, who landed in Maryland in 1658. William Lavington to Barbados in 1679.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Lavington who landed in Australia in the 19th century included John Lavington at the age of 29, arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Mallard.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Lavington: England 419; United States 151; Australia 56; Wales 45; Scotland 26; New Zealand 9; Canada 9; Trinidad and Tobago 2; Belgium 1; Germany 1.

Notable People:

George Lavington (January 1684 –September 1762) was a priest of Exeter from 1746 to 1762. He was born in Mildenhall, Wiltshire to Rev Joseph Lavington and his wife Elizabeth nee Constable, he got an education at New College, Oxford (becoming a fellow in 1708) and later selected Minister to King George I. He gave services as a Prebendary at Worcester Cathedral. After that, he gave services as Weldland Prebendary at St Paul’s Cathedral, London.

Ralph Payne, 1st Baron Lavington (1739–1807), was a British leader.

Lavington Family Gift Ideas

Browse Lavington family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Ar. a saltire gu. on a chief of the last three boars’ heads couped of the first. Crest—A covered cup ar.
2) (Bassishaw, Scotland). Ar. a saltire gu. in chief a crescent sa. on a chief of the second three boars’ heads couped.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire
7. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P63
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cup
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P288
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117