Lawrence Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Lawrence Family Coat of Arms

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Lawrence Coat of Arms Meaning

Lawrence Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Lawrance, Laurence.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Lawrence. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Lawrence Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Lawrence blazon are the cross raguly and lion. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, argent and or .

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. Of the decorative edges raguly can be at first hard to identify, but once we understand that it arises from an old word raggguled meaning ”chopped off”. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Raguly we can see that the curious shapes are intended to represent boughs lopped off a tree trunk. (This is also the origin of the term “ragged staff” see so frequently with a bear in Heraldry). Wade suggests that the use of this decoration represents “difficulties that have been encountered” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P41, and we can perhaps understand that the “hacked path” resulting shows that these difficulties have been overcome.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 16Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 17A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 18The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Lawrence Name

Lawrence Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Lawrence:

The surname of Lawrence can be found within the cultures in England and Scotland. However, there are spellings of this surname of Lawrence that can be found within German, Spanish, Italian, Czech, and French cultures. The original derivative of the surname of Lawrence comes from the personal given name of “Laurentius” which comes from “the city of laurels,” named as Laurentium, and located in the country of Italy. The flower, named as the laurel, is seen throughout the world as the symbol of victory, which is most likely why this symbol carries over to many names throughout history. The Christian community in Europe favored this name because of the connection to St. Laurence, who was the Archdeacon of Rome in the mid 3rd Century. St. Lawrence was martyred under Valerian in the year 258 AD, and he is prominent figure in Scotland, as the church of Edzel is dedicated to him. Since there was a popular saint associated with the name, many people began to name their children as such, which eventually led to the surname becoming patronymic.

Variations:

More common variations are: Laurence, Lawrance, Laurance, Lowrance, Lawrie, Lawrenson, Lawes, Larkin, Larking

Scotland:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Lawrence was found in the country of Scotland. One person who was recorded as being named as Magister Laurentis was named in the document entitled the Episcopal Records of Glasgow in the year of 1150. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King David I of Scotland, who ruled as the King of the Scots from the year 1124 to the year 1153. Throughout the country of Scotland, there are many people who bear the surname of Lawrence. The areas that include high concentrations of the people who are known by the surname of Lawrence can be found within the counties of Angus, Bannffshire, and Aberdeenshire counties.

England:

In the country of England, there are many people who carry the surname of Lawrence. The areas that have a higher population of people who are known by the surname of Lawrence can be found within the counties of Yorkshire, Essex, Kent and Lancashire counties. There are also many people who bear the surname within the areas in and around the city of London. Those who carry the surname of Lawrence can be found in high concentrations in these areas.

United States of America:

Within the United States of America, there are many people who bear the surname of Lawrence. Throughout the 1600’s it became common to migrate to the United States of America, which at that time was referred to as the New World, or the Colonies. These people were upset with the state of the living conditions in their country, and thus moved to the United States. This movement of people was referred to as The European Migration. The first person who bore the surname of Lawrence who arrived in the United States was one person by the name of John Lawrence, who migrated to the U.S. in 1635. Those who carry this surname of Lawrence in the United States can be found large concentrations in the states of California, New York, Ohio, and within the state of Pennsylvania.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Lawrence: United States 142,609; Nigeria 68,012; England 37,116; South Africa 21,405; Canada 14,915; Australia 14, 513; Uganda 11,389; Jamaica 10,298; Tanzania 7,601; India 4,288

Notable People:

J. Vinton “Vint” Lawrence (1939-2016) who was a paramilitary officer for the United States Central Intelligence Agency and who was also a member of the Elite Special Forces Division

Francis Leo Lawrence (1937-2013) who was an educator and French literature scholar from America who served as the president of Rutgers University from the year 1990 to the year 2002

Major-General Charles White Lawrence (1901-1982) who was a Commanding General from America of the 3700th Air Force Indoctrination Wing and of the Lackland ABF in Texas from the year 1949 to the year 1951

Major-General Thompson Lawrence (1889-1973) who was the commanding general from America of the 99th division from the year 1942 to the year 1943

Wendy Barrien Lawrence who was born in the year 1959 has logged over 1,225 hours in space during her run as a NASA astronaut

J. H. St. Lawrence who was a politician from America who was the Mayor of Pullman Washington in the year 1896

Vicki Lawrence (1949-2004) who was a comedienne, singer, and actress from America

Lawrence Family Gift Ideas

Browse Lawrence family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Hemsworth Hall, co. York). Motto—Virtute vinces. Per saltire erm. and or, on a chief engr. az. three bezants, each charged with a saltire gu. Crest—Upon a nest an eagle, wings elevated or, the nest and wings fretty vert.
2) (Foxhall, co. Gloucester). Ar. a cross raguly gu. in the 1st quarter a lion pass. of the last. Crest—A wolf's head ppr. charged on the neck with a crescent or.
3) (co. Hants). Ar. a cross betw. four cinquefoils gu. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a talbot sejant of the first.
4) (Delaford, Chertsey, and Chelsea, co. Middlesex). Ar. a cross raguly gu. on a chief az. three leopards’ faces or. Crest—A demi turbot, tail erect gu.
5) (Ashton Hall and Washington, co. Lancaster, Fisbnry, co. Wilts, and St. James's, co. Suffolk; descended from Sir Robert Lawrence, of Ashton Hall, who accompanied Richard I. to the Holy Land). Ar. a cross raguly gu. Crest—A demi turbot ar. tail upwards. Another Crest—Two laurel branches vert, forming a chaplet. Another Crest—A wolf's head couped ppr.
6) (Sevenhampton and Sandywell Park, co. Gloucester, Crich Grange, co. Dorset; in Har. MSS. 891, a curious badge is recorded as belonging to this family, attached to the coat of Lawrence, quartering Washington). Same Arms. Crest—The tail and lower part of a fish erected and couped ppr.
7) (Sandywell Park, co. Gloucester; Walter Lawrence Lawrence, Esq., assumed the name and arms of Lawrence, in lieu of his patronymic Morris, by desire of his maternal grandfather, Walter Lawrence, Esq., of Sevenhampton, descended in a direct line from Sir Robert Lawrence, who acquired the arms in Palestine in 1191). Same Arms, a crescent for diff. Crest—The tail and lower part of a fish erect and couped ppr.
8) (Iver, co. Buckingham, bart., extinct 1714). (St. Ive’s, co. Huntingdon, bart., extinct 1756). Same Arms, on a chief of the second a lion pass. guard. or. Crest—A stag’s head erased sa. plattée, attired or, ducally gorged ar.
9) (Cowsfield House, co. Wilts, Mossley Hall, co. Lancaster, and Fairfield, in Jamaica; John Lawrence settled in Jamaica 1676, a younger son of Henry Lawrence, Esq., of St. Ives, co. Huntingdon). Motto— In cruce salus. Same Arms, without the chief. Crest—A demi turbot, tail erect ppr.
10) (Delaford, Chertsey, and Chelsea, co. Middlesex). Ar. a cross raguly gu. on a chief az. three leopards’ faces or. Crest—A demi turbot, tail erect gu.
11) (co. Devon). Chequy or and az. on a bend gu. three escallops ar.
12) Bart. Motto—Never give in. Erm. on a cross raguly gu. an eastern crown or, on a chief az. two swords in saltire ppr. pommels and hilts gold, betw. as many leopards' faces ar. Crest—Out of an eastern crown or, a cubit arm entwined by a wreath of laurel and holding a dagger all ppr.
13) (Baron Lawrence). Motto—Be ready. Same Arms and Crest. Supporters—Dexter, an officer of the Guide cavalry (irregulars), of the Pathan tribe, in the province of Peshawar, habited and accoutred ppr.; sinister, an officer of the Sikh irregular cavalry, also habited and accoutred ppr.
14) (Ealing Park, co. Middlesex, bart.). Motto—Mente et labore. Erm. a cross raguly gu. in the 1st and 4th quarters a serpent nowed ppr. Crest—A gryphon’s head couped ar. in front thereof a serpent nowed ppr.
15) (Westbourne Terrace, Middlesex, bart.). Motto—Per ardua stabilis. Erm. on a cross raguly gu. betw. in the 1st and 4th quarters a fasces erect, surrounded by a wreath of oak leaves ppr. a pair of compasses extended or. Crest—On a wreath of the colours a wolf's head erased ar. crusily, charged with a pair of compasses extended sa.
16) (Robert John Grews Lawrence, Esq., of Montagu Square, d. 1833). Motto—Fortiter gerit crucem. Erm. a cross raguly gu. on a chief of the last a lion pass. or, and canton erm. Crest—A lion ramp.
17) (confirmed, 1559, by Harvey, Clarenceux, to Lawrence, Sheriff of Rugby). Az. on a chev. engr. betw. three griffins' heads erased or, a fleur-de-lis of the field betw. two roses gu. Crest—A lion's paw erased or, holding a branch of dates vert, fructed or, husks ar.
18) (granted to John Lawrence, of London, and James and Abraham, his brothers, sons of Abraham Lawrence, by Bysshe, Clarenceux, 1664). Erm. a cross raguly gu. and a canton ermines. Crest—A saltire raguly ar. encircled with two branches of laurel vert.
19) (granted to Richard Lawrence, Esq., of Foxcote, co. Gloucester, by Dethick, Garter, 1598). Ar. a cross raguly, in the 1st quarter a lion pass. gu. Crest—A fox's head ppr. charged with a bezant.
20) (Seaborow, co. Dorset, 1634). Ar. on a cross raguly gu. a fleur-de-lis of the field. Crest—A demi turbot erect, tail upwards ar.
21) (London, 1634). Ar. on a cross raguly gu. five crescents or, on a chief az. three lions’ faces of the last. Crest—A dolphin naiant ppr.
22) (London; granted 18 Nov. 1652). Ar. a cross raguly gu. a canton ermines. Crest—Two trunks of a tree raguly in saltire, environed with a chaplet vert.
23) (West Stocklands, co. Leicester). Sa. three lozenges ar. each charged with a saltire gu.
24) Motto—Que pensé. Gu. two swords in saltire ppr. betw. four cinquefoils ar. Crest—A sea lion parted per fesse ar. and ppr.
25) Sa. a chev. betw. three broken swords ar. on a chief embattled of the second as many martlets gu.
26) (Cirencester, co. Gloucester). Gu. two chev. ar. Crest—A griffin’s head erased.
27) (Studley Park, co. York). Ar. a cross raguly gu. quartering Aislabie, viz., Gu. three lozenges in fesse ar. Crest—A wolf's head az. charged on the neck with a crescent or.
28) (Scotland). Ar. a cross gu. on a chief of the second a lion pass. guard. or. Crest—An acorn slipped and leaved vert.
29) Az. three martlets or, a border of the last, charged with eight chess-rooks az.
30) (Lisreaghan, co. Galway; claiming descent from Lawrence, of Ashton Hall, co. Lancaster). Motto—Pro rege, et pro patriâ, semper. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a cross raguly gu., for Lawrence; 2nd and 3rd, sa. a catharine wheel betw. two crescents in chief and a trefoil in base or, for Scott. Crest—A demi turbot, tail erect ppr.
31) (Sherdington. co. Gloucester, 1682). Ar. a cross raguly gu. Crest—A demi fish erect, tail upwards, per pale ar. and gu.
32) (co. Lancaster, 1567). Ar. a cross raguly gu.
33) (Mathew Laurence, second son of Sir Oliver Laurence; his dau., Elizabeth, to. Martin Freeman, of London. Visit. London, 1563). Ar. a cross ragulée gu., quartering Washington, viz., ar, two bars, in chief two mullets gu.
34) (certified by Betham, Ulster, to Walter Laurence, Esq., of Lisreaghan, co. Galway). Motto—Pro rege sæpe, pro patria semper. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a cross raguly gu., for Laurence; 2nd and 3rd, sa. a catharine wheel betw. two crescents in chief and a trefoil in base or, for Scott. Crest—A demi turbot, tail erect ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Raguly
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P41
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
16. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
17. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60