Leaf Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Leaf Family Coat of Arms

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Leaf Coat of Arms Meaning

Leaf Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Leaf. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Leaf Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Leaf blazon are the chevron, bee, dove and leaf. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, azure and argent .

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 8A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.9The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

We might well expect thebee, industrious creator of honey with all its association of both work and sweet reward, 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 80, but we also find other members of the insect kingdom, both decorative, such as the butterfly and more of a nuisance, such as the cricket! 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P260.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. In truth, despite the proliferation of species, the actual depictions can sometimes be hard to distinguish! The dove is an example of this, closely related birds such as pigeon and stock dove are frequently mentioned in arms but visually almost identical. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dove The dove itself is said to represent “loving constancy and peace” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P80, the other birds possibly some play on words with the family name (PIDGEON for example).

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Leaf Name

Leaf Origin:

England

Origins of Leaf:

Listed with many spellings such as Leaf, Leafe, Leefe, Life, Liff, Leif, Leaves and Leavis, this is ultimately an English surname. It has many possible sources. The first acquired from the old English pre 7th-century word “leof,” which means dear or darling, and as such was an introduction name. After in the Middle Ages, it was also given as a nickname of affection similar to Dear or Darling, which in themselves became ultimately famous surnames. Secondly, it may have been a geographical nickname for a person who lived in a forest or woodland, and also one who lived in a “leafy” area, as in the document of one Robert In the leaves, in the London recordings of the 14th Century. Thirdly it may be a shortened form of the first Swedish names like Lovberg which means leaf hill, Lovdahl, leaf Dale, or Lovquist, leaf twig.

Variations:

More common variations are: Leafe, Leafa, Leaff, Leafi, Leafu, Leaif, Leafy, Laf, Lef, Leaife.

England:

The origins of the surname Leaf was found in Norfolk where people held a family seat from early times.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Godwin Lief, dated about 1198, in the “pipe rolls of the division of Norfolk,” Huntingdonshire. It was during the time of King Richard I who was known to be the “The Lionheart,” dated 1189-1199. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with name Leaf had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Leaf settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Leaf who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Henry Leaf arrived in Barbados in the year 1663.

The following century saw much more Leaf surnames come. Some of the people with the name Leaf who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Dennis Leaf settled to Pennsylvania in the year 1865.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Leaf: United States 4,040; England 721; Australia 189; India 66; Canada 242; South Africa 365; New-Zealand 237; China 70; Malaysia 278; Taiwan 290.

Notable People:

Andrew Keith “Andy” Leaf was born in January in the year 1962. He is an old English professional football player.

Caroline Leaf was born in August in the year 1946 in Seattle, Washington. He is a Canadian-American film producer and painter

Lieutenant General (Resigned) Daniel P. “Fig” Leaf was assistant Commander and Acting officer in the United States Pacific Command, Camp H. M. Smith, Hawaii.

Henry Meredith Leaf was born in October 1862 and died in April 1931. He was a British fighter who took part in the 1908 Summer Olympics.

Jonathan Leaf is a scripture and scholar. He lived in New York City. He is the author of the off-Broadway play The Caterers, which was selected for Best Full-Length Original Script of 2005-2006 in the Innovative Theater Awards.

Richard Leaf was born in January 1967. He is an English actor. He has many small performances in television and stage productions. He is married to actress Tamsin Greig, star of Black Books, Green Wing, and Love Soup.

Robert Daniel Leaf (February 1936 – October 2005) was an American writer.

Robert Daniel Leaf was born and grew up in Lindsborg, Kansas. The son of Bernard and Judith (Valine) Leaf, he joined Luther Academy and College in Wahoo, Nebraska, played bugle in the Air Force band, and completed his undergraduate degree at MacPhail School of Music in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Ryan David Leaf was born in May in the year 1976. He is American football player who was a quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for four seasons.

Ty Jacob “T. J.” Leaf was born in April 1997. He is an American–Israeli college basketball player for the UCLA Bruins.

Sir Walter Leaf (November 1852, Norwood, Middlesex – March 1927, Torquay) was an English financial analyst.

Leaf Family Gift Ideas

Browse Leaf family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Park Hill, Streatham). Az. on a chev. ar. betw. three staff tree leaves slipped or, as many bees volant ppr. Crest —A dove rising ppr. resting the dexter claw on a staff tree leaf or.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
8. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
9. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 80
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P260
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dove
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P80