Leatham Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Leatham Family Coat of Arms

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Leatham Coat of Arms Meaning

Leatham Name Origin & History

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Leatham Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Leatham blazon are the chief indented, plate, bezant and per saltire. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, argent and azure .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The chief is a separate area across the top of the field 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40. It is normally marked by a straight line of partition, but for artistic effect, and for clarity of difference between coats of arms, heralds have developed a series of decorative patterns to be used along the edge. An line drawn indented, i.e. in a saw-tooth pattern might be taken for dancettee, but in this case the individual “teeth” are much smaller. An early author, Guilllim seeks to associate this decoration with fire 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P39, and one can see the resemblance to flames. The visual effect is quite striking, an good example being the arms of DUNHAM (Lincolnshire), which are Azure, a chief indented or.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146 One of the simplest such shapes is the plain circle, known to heralds as the roundle. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle So popular is this charge that a shorthand has arisen for roundles of a particular colour and plate is a roundle argent, or white. Most authorities agree that the English usage signifies the “Manchet cake” or communion wafer and thus is a symbol of religious allegiance.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the bezant Is a typical example of this, and in British Heraldry always takes the tincture or. It shares the same root as the name Byzantium, being associated with the gold coin of that city and indeed, in some heraldic traditions is represented as a coin-like disk in perspective. Wade suggests that the use of this device refers to ” one who had been found worthy of trust and treasure.” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Leatham Name

Leatham Origin:

England

Origins of Leatham:

Listed as Leatham and Letham, this is an English geographical surname. It is a modification of the more common surname Latham, itself from any one of the following places as Latham, in West Yorkshire; Lathom, in Lancashire; and Laytham in East Yorkshire. All of these share a similar meaning and origin, which is “The place of the shelters,” from the pre 7th century Old Norse word “hlatha,” which means a shelter, and a short form of the Olde English word “ham” which means a house or property. Lathom in Lancashire was noted as “Latune” in the Domesday Book of 1086, while Laytham in East Yorkshire shows as “Ladone” in the similar document. Geographical Surnames frequently originated by those residents of a place who shifted to another area and were there best recognized by the name of their birthplace. Examples of documentations contain the wedding of John Leatham, and Kathleen Lee noted in Carlton near Snaith in Yorkshire in January 1626, while Thomas Letham was a naming observer at St Katherines Creechurch, in the city of London, in April 1764.

Variations:

More common variations are: Latham, Leetham, Laytham, Lathom, Lethem, Leathern.

England:

The surname Leatham was first found in Lancashire at Lathom, a hamlet and local church about 5 km northeast of Ormskirk. The place name records back to the Domesday Book of 1086 where it was recorded as Latune and next as Lathum in 1200, and Lathom in 1223. One of the earliest documents of the name was Robert Fitzhenry de Lathom who held estates all over the South Lancashire in 1189. “This place was the seat of the Lathom family, of whom Robert de Lathom, in the period of Edward I., received the donation of a weekly market and an annual celebration, and whose baronial house of Lathom House, unusual for its length and grace, and impressive for its strength, afterwards became so famous in history. “ At Whiston in the church of Prescot, “in the rule of Richard II. the Lathoms had lands here, which descended through many generations and the Torbocks, of whom the Lathoms were a section, were, at a very old period, maintained of Rudgate, in this palace.” The church of Huyton was another old family seat.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Robert de Latham, dated about 1204, in the “Assize Court Rolls of Yorkshire.” It was during the time of King John who was known to be the “Poll Tax,” dated 1199-1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Leatham had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Leatham who came to Canada in the 18th century included Thomas Leatham and Thomas Leatham, both landed in Nova Scotia in the same year 1749.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Leatham who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Alice Leatham and John Leatham also arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Nimroud” in the same year 1860. Elizabeth Leatham arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Nimroud” in 1860. George Leatham and Ann Leatham, both arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Waitangi” in the same year 1874.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Leatham: United States 1,268; England 613; Australia 392; Greece 123; Canada 96; New Zealand 83; Scotland 53; Ireland 33; Sweden 22; Spain 8

Notable People:

Edward Aldam Leatham (August 1828–February 1900) was an English Liberal Member of Parliament.

William Leatham (1785–1842) was a leading Banker in Wakefield.

Albert Leatham (August 1859–July 1948) was an English cricket player.

William Henry Leatham (July 1815–November 1889) was a British manager, poet, and Liberal leader.

John Leatham was born in August 1946. He is an old Australian rules football player who played with Carlton in the Victorian Football League (VFL).

Leatham Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (High Hall, Hemsworth, co. York). Motto—Virtute vinces. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. on a chief indented az. three plates, for Leatham; 2nd and 2rd, ar. a chev. betw. three crescents sa. Crest—An eagle with wings elevated, preying on an infant ppr. swaddled az. banded ar.
2) (Hemsworth Hall, co. York). Motto—Virtute vinces. Per saltire erm. and or, on a chief engr. az. three bezants, each charged with a saltire gu. Crest—Upon a nest an eagle, wings elevated or, the nest and wings fretty vert.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P39
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122