Leaton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Leaton Family Coat of Arms

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Leaton Coat of Arms Meaning

Leaton Name Origin & History

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Leaton Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Leaton blazon are the cross crosslet fitchee, fesse and lion. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, gules and argent .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.4The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, having an additional cross bar on each arm. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103 The final addition fitchee simply means pointed, and indicates that the lower end is pointed, as if it is to be struck into the ground. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 16Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 17A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 18The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Leaton Name

Leaton Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Leaton:

According to the early recordings of the spelling forms of the name, this interesting and unique name is listed as Layton, Laytoun, Leaton, Leighton, Leyton, and Leaton, this is a famous surname of English or sometimes Scottish, origins. It is locational from either Leaton, a hamlet near Shrewsbury in Shropshire, or one of the different villages called Leighton in the divisions of Bedfordshire, Cheshire, Huntingdon, Shropshire or Laytoun in Scotland. All acquire from the pre 7th-century word ‘leac’ which means a leek, and explain leek farms. From old times, the name holders have made their mark, with Richard Leighton being knighted by King Edward II of England in 1313, while in 1330 Randolph de Leighton was similarly rewarded by King Edward III. Other early records include Roger de Leyton in the Hundred Rolls of Huntingdon in 1276 and William de Leton who shows in the Cheshire Rolls of 1287. The surname was early into Scotland, with Henry Leghton being a priest of Aberdeen in 1440. Frederick Leighton RA was the first Baron Leighton of Stretton, (1830-1896).

Variations:

More common variations are: Leayton, leyaton, Lieaton, leeaton, L Eaton, Leahton, Laton, Leton, Leyatone, Lawton.

England:

The surname Leaton first appeared in Shropshire, where “the Leightons are declared to have seated at Leighton in this division before the Invasion as Domesday has ‘Rainald (vicecom’) ten’ Lestone; Leuui tenuit temp. Reg. 151de Hence there can be no difficulty the name Lestone, i.e. Lewi’s-town, now Leighton acquired. “Today Leighton is named Leighton and Eaton Constantine. Later in Huntingdon, Roger de Leyton and Clement de Leyton noted in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273. The same rolls noted Henry de Leyton in Buckinghamshire. As one would expect, Leighton in Cheshire was at one time held by the family. “At the time of the Domesday Survey, this place related to Robert de Rodelent, after whose death it given to the barons of Montalt, of whom it held by the Leighton family.”

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Richard de Lecton, dated about 1201, in the “Pipe Rolls of Staffordshire”. It was during the time of King John, dated 1199 – 1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Leaton had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Leaton: United States 600; England 134; Australia 35; Canada 14; New Zealand 5; Thailand 1; Czech Republic 1; Russia 1; Morocco 1; Isle of Man 1.

Notable People:

Anne Leaton (born July 1932) is a novel writer, short story writer, and poet whose works have been released in England and America and whose radio plays have been announced on the BBC. She was born in Cleburne, Texas, she studied English and creative writing at Indiana University and Texas Tech University and was a Fulbright professor in Germany, after which she spent twenty years travelling and working in Europe, the Middle East, South Africa, and Canada. She has got various awards for her fiction and poetry, including twice being the winner of an O. Henry Award for her short stories. Leaton’s work has been compared to other authors whose focus has been primarily upon social mores and human characteristics—specifically such novel writers and short story writers as Jane Austen, Henry James, and John Cheever. She lives in Fort Worth, Texas.

Tim Leaton (born December 1983) is an American film producer, assistant director, and editor. He won important critical attention in 2006 when he was awarded the grand prize of the 2006 Film Your Issue competition, decided by President Barack Obama, George Clooney and the Dalai Lama, among others. He presented his winning film Orphans in Africa and gave acceptance speeches, covered by the press, at three awards ceremonies like at the United Nations Headquarters, then again in Hollywood, and finally during Sundance in Park City with Kevin Bacon and Mandy Moore. He also won the 2006 grand prize Walt Disney Pictures paid internship.

Leaton Family Gift Ideas

Browse Leaton family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Whick, co. Durham). Motto—Dieu defende le droit. Ar. a fess betw. six crosses crosslet fitchee sa. Crest—A lion ramp. or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
16. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
17. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60